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Vitamin D

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HEALTH
January 2, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Vitamin D appears to lower the risk of colon, breast and ovarian cancer, say researchers who reviewed 63 studies, including several large long-term ones, on the relationship between vitamin D and certain cancers. "There's nothing that has this ability to prevent cancer," said researcher Dr. Cedric Garland, urging governments and public health officials to do more to fortify foods with vitamin D. The findings were published online in the American Journal of Public Health.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
April 4, 2014 | By Dana Sullivan Kilroy
Not milk? Choosing milk for your morning cereal or coffee used to be pretty simple: skim, low-fat or whole. These days, though, market shelves and refrigerators are crowded with an array of alternatives: soy, almond, rice, hemp and more. While some people opt for these beverages because they're vegan, they have allergies or because they're lactose intolerant, the beverages are increasingly popular for another reason too. "We're all being encouraged to eat a more plant-based diet, and some of these products fit that category," says Andrea Giancoli, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and a policy analyst at the Beach Cities Health District Blue Zones Project in Hermosa Beach, an initiative to develop healthier communities.
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HEALTH
December 19, 2005 | From Times wire reports
Higher amounts of vitamin D could help make it easier to breathe, offering possible good news for smokers, asthmatics and other people with respiratory problems. Researchers at the University of Auckland in New Zealand found that people with higher levels of the vitamin in their systems showed better lung function than those with lower amounts. Although the vitamin, which people get mostly from sunlight, is linked to lung health, the exact relationship is unclear, they said.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Looking for ways to save money in 2014? Here's some advice from doctors: Stop buying vitamins. Time after time, studies have shown that vitamin and mineral supplements don't prevent disease or death. And yet consumers keep buying them, lament the authors of an editorial published in Tuesday's edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine. A 2011 report from the National Center for Health Statistics estimated that 53% of American adults used some type of supplement in the years 2003 to 2006, with multivitamin/multimineral formulations being the most popular.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New studies indicate that vitamin D, a nutrient made by the skin during exposure to sunlight, can lower the risk of breast cancer by 30% to 40% and perhaps even more. Epidemiologist Esther John of the North California Cancer Center said at a meeting of breast cancer experts that a study comparing the health habits of 133 breast cancer patients with women who did not have the disease found that exposure to sunlight significantly reduced the risk of breast cancer.
HEALTH
September 26, 2005 | Elena Conis
Vitamin D -- the fat-soluble vitamin that's technically a hormone -- is crucial for good bone health. Manufactured in the skin with the help of the sun's ultraviolet B rays, the vitamin regulates absorption and excretion of calcium. Because it's found in very few foods (fatty fish and cod liver oil are on the short list), most Americans, particularly the sun-deprived, get the vitamin from fortified milk and cereal products.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998
New research finds vitamin D deficiency surprisingly common among older adults, especially those in poor health, and concludes that even a daily multivitamin may not provide enough of this essential nutrient. A study of patients at a Boston hospital, reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that more than half had too little vitamin D in their bodies, a condition that increases the risk of bone fractures and may have other ill effects, as well.
HEALTH
July 8, 2002 | JUDY FOREMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hanging out in the sun, letting your face acquire that nice, ruddy glow, used to feel good. Then came all those depressing public health messages telling us that the sun was dangerous, that we should feel guilty about even the slightest tan. Well, fellow sun worshipers, the sad truth is that, as a general rule, we should still practice "safe sun" much of the time. But there's a new ray of hope--dare we say "sunshine"?
HEALTH
April 11, 2005 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
Most adults, especially those older than 50, appear to be falling short on recommended daily levels of vitamin D, an essential nutrient long known to preserve bones and now increasingly tied to protection against other common ailments, including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. And just drinking more vitamin-D fortified milk or juice may not make up the deficit, experts say.
SCIENCE
May 16, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Women who had a vitamin D deficiency when they were diagnosed with breast cancer were 94% more likely to have their cancer metastasize and 73% more likely to die within 10 years, Canadian researchers reported Thursday. The team also found that only 24% of the women in its study had what are normally considered adequate levels of vitamin D at the time of the diagnosis. The study represents "the first time that vitamin D has been linked to breast cancer progression," said Dr.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
More than half of American women over the age of 60 take vitamin D and calcium supplements, but the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said this week that they're probably wasting their money. In a new recommendations from the federal government's expert panel on preventive medicine, the task force says that most postmenopausal women should not take vitamin D and calcium to reduce their risk of bone fractures. The dosages assessed were 400 international units (IUs) of vitamin D3 and 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day. The conclusions are based on an analysis of six randomized trials designed to study the health effects of vitamin D and calcium supplements.
SCIENCE
October 31, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Low levels of vitamin D in the blood double the risk of developing bladder cancer, Spanish researchers reported Wednesday. The low levels increase the risk of the most aggressive form of the disease almost six-fold, the researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Spain has about 11,000 new cases of bladder cancer per year, one of the highest rates in the world. The United States has about 73,500 new cases per year, with nearly 15,000 deaths. It is primarily a disease of the elderly, with nine out of 10 victims over the age of 55. Low levels of vitamin D have previously been linked to increased risk of breast and colon cancer, but no one has studied the potential association with bladder cancer, according to Dr. Nuria Malats, a geneticist at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
If you're trying to ward off the sniffles, you can take vitamin D supplements out of your shopping cart: A new study reports that dosing with the vitamin does nothing to prevent colds or other forms of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). The effect of vitamin D on the immune system has been debated for a long time. Controlled laboratory research has shown that vitamin D has several beneficial effects on the immune system, and some studies conducted in the past have suggested that people with low levels of the vitamin are at higher risk for URTIs.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
For kids who get a lot of colds during the winter, a boost in vitamin D levels may be just what the doctor ordered, researchers reported Monday. Supplementing vitamin D intake for children who were deficient halved the number of colds the children contracted, a team reported in the journal Pediatrics. Observational studies have suggested that low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of colds. The new study is apparently the first to show that supplementing children's intake of the vitamin can reduce their risk of colds.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
  We mostly get our vitamin D by exposure to the sun, and these days, who just goes out in the sun? So there's been a lot of attention given to - and confusion over - vitamin D supplements, something many doctors recommend. Now there's a new study a possible vitamin D benefit: In a group of women older than 65 who had gained weight over 4½ years, those whose levels of the vitamin were low had gained a little more weight, researchers found in a study published Monday.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Vitamin D may be helpful in protecting highly active pre-teen and teen girls, such as those who play sports, from stress fractures, researchers reported Monday. The study was surprising because calcium has long been considered the nutrient most vital to bone health in children. But, in developing children, vitamin D intake may matter more. Researchers analyzed data from 6,721 girls ages 9 to 15 at the start of the study. The girls' intake of calcium, vitamin D and dairy products was recorded along with stress fractures, which are common sports-related injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1990 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, Doheny is a freelance writer in Burbank who writes frequently in The Times
Slowly but steadily, the evils of sunbathing have been etched into American consciousness. Stay out of the sun, most everyone has been warned by physicians at one time or another, to minimize the risk of skin cancer, not to mention an onslaught of wrinkles. If sun worshiping is still a must, so is sunscreen, most doctors say. Now, some researchers are crying "overkill." Getting a little sun, they claim, isn't a bad idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Medical scientists based at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles have shown that osteoporosis, a much-dreaded ailment of old age, appears to have roots in early childhood, with some children inheriting genes that increase their risk of brittle bones later in life. Led by Dr. Vicente Gilsanz, a radiologist at the hospital, and Jesus Sainz, a neurology researcher at the UCLA School of Medicine, the scientists used CT scanners to measure the bone density of 100 healthy girls between 6 and 12 years old.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Vitamin D has emerged as something of a wonder supplement, according to the claims of dozens of studies published in the past few years. Researchers have suggested that adequate levels of the nutrient not only strengthen bones, but reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and other conditions. Several studies also suggest Americans are not getting enough vitamin D, which is synthesized in the skin from sun exposure and found in certain foods, such as fortified milk and cereal, some types of fish and legumes.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Vitamin D works with calcium to strengthen bones. But adequate levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream also appear to boost the power of bisphosphonates, medications used to treat osteoporosis, according to research presented Monday. The study adds to the evidence that the current recommendations for vitamin D may be too low. Late last year, the Institute of Medicine issued a report that declined to make changes to the recommendation -- despite many new studies supporting the need for more vitamin D than is typically consumed.
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