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December 31, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease were able to care for themselves longer and needed less help performing everyday chores when they took a daily capsule containing 2,000 IUs of alpha tocopherol, or vitamin E, a study has found. Compared with subjects who took placebo pills, those who took daily supplements of the antioxidant vitamin E and were followed for an average of two years and three months delayed their loss of function by a little over six months on average, a 19% improvement.
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SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
If you are taking vitamin supplements to reduce your risk of heart disease or cancer, a government panel of health experts wants you to know that you're probably wasting your money. In some cases, those vitamins may actually increase your risk of cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force came to this conclusion Monday after reviewing dozens of studies, including many randomized clinical trials, considered the gold standard for medical research. The task force's final recommendation was published online Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Don't expect to get a vitamin boost from 7-Up drinks any more. The maker of the beverage, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, agreed to stop adding vitamin E to some of its drinks and halt claims that the product has antioxidants as part of a settlement with a health advocacy group. The company had been infusing small amounts of vitamin E into some varieties of 7-Up -- regular and diet Cherry Antioxidant, Mixed Berry Antioxidant and Pomegranate Antioxidant -- when the firm was sued  in November in U.S. District Court in California on behalf of a Sherman Oaks man. The Center for Science in the Public Interest also took issue with the images of berries and pomegranates on the soda's labels, saying it gave the impression that the antioxidants came from fruit instead of the added vitamin E. “Soda is not a health food, and should not be marketed as a healthy source of antioxidants or other nutrients,” Steve Gardner, litigation director at CSPI, said in a statement.  “It's to the credit of Dr Pepper Snapple Group that it carefully considered these concerns, and worked collaboratively to resolve the dispute without further litigation.  The end result is a big plus for consumers.” Texas-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group did not immediately return calls seeking comment.
SCIENCE
December 31, 2013 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease were able to care for themselves longer and needed less help performing everyday chores when they took a daily capsule containing 2,000 IUs of alpha tocopherol, or vitamin E, a study has found. Compared with subjects who took placebo pills, those who took daily supplements of the antioxidant vitamin E and were followed for an average of two years and three months delayed their loss of function by a little over six months on average, a 19% improvement.
HEALTH
July 11, 2005 | Elena Conis
A decade ago, vitamin E earned a reputation as a potent heart disease- and cancer-preventing antioxidant. Studies showed a lower risk of heart disease in people who took vitamin E supplements or got lots of the vitamin from their diets, and animal and lab research suggested that the vitamin prevented fat from building up in blood vessels. The essential, fat-soluble vitamin is crucial for healthy eyes and skin and a robust immune system.
HEALTH
March 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Large doses of vitamin E -- widely touted as an elixir of youth -- do not protect against heart attacks and cancer and might actually raise the risk of heart failure in people with diabetes or clogged arteries, researchers have found. The study, published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is just the latest to cast doubt on the safety and effectiveness of vitamin E supplements and other antioxidants.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
Vitamin E pills reduced prostate cancer risk by a third and the disease's death rate by 41% in a study of thousands of smokers, researchers report. The same study, in Finland, found that a form of vitamin A had no effect on reducing cancer. "There may be a pattern developing of some kind of broad cancer preventive effect from vitamin E," said Dr. Demetrius Albanes, a National Cancer Institute researcher and co-author of the study.
HEALTH
November 4, 2002 | Dianne Partie Lange
In pill form, antioxidants may not do much to prevent Parkinson's disease, new research indicates, but at least one shows promise when eaten in food. When researchers analyzed the food frequency questionnaires and supplement records of more than 100,000 participants in an ongoing health study, they discovered that getting large amounts of antioxidants from pills, even when combined with food sources, didn't help prevent Parkinson's disease.
HEALTH
April 28, 2003
A University of California anatomy professor researching reproduction in rats discovered vitamin E in 1922. In humans, the powerful antioxidant is essential for healthy eyes and skin, as well as a strong immune system. Vitamin E exists as eight individual compounds abundant in a variety of fruits and green vegetables, including avocados, mangos and turnip greens.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
One or two capsules of Vitamin E daily can at least partially reverse the decline in immunity that normally occurs during aging and thereby might make it easier for the elderly to fight off disease, a researcher from the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Department of Agriculture nutritionist Simin N.
SCIENCE
December 17, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Looking for ways to save money in 2014? Here's some advice from doctors: Stop buying vitamins. Time after time, studies have shown that vitamin and mineral supplements don't prevent disease or death. And yet consumers keep buying them, lament the authors of an editorial published in Tuesday's edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine. A 2011 report from the National Center for Health Statistics estimated that 53% of American adults used some type of supplement in the years 2003 to 2006, with multivitamin/multimineral formulations being the most popular.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Don't expect to get a vitamin boost from 7-Up drinks any more. The maker of the beverage, Dr. Pepper Snapple Group, agreed to stop adding vitamin E to some of its drinks and halt claims that the product has antioxidants as part of a settlement with a health advocacy group. The company had been infusing small amounts of vitamin E into some varieties of 7-Up -- regular and diet Cherry Antioxidant, Mixed Berry Antioxidant and Pomegranate Antioxidant -- when the firm was sued  in November in U.S. District Court in California on behalf of a Sherman Oaks man. The Center for Science in the Public Interest also took issue with the images of berries and pomegranates on the soda's labels, saying it gave the impression that the antioxidants came from fruit instead of the added vitamin E. “Soda is not a health food, and should not be marketed as a healthy source of antioxidants or other nutrients,” Steve Gardner, litigation director at CSPI, said in a statement.  “It's to the credit of Dr Pepper Snapple Group that it carefully considered these concerns, and worked collaboratively to resolve the dispute without further litigation.  The end result is a big plus for consumers.” Texas-based Dr Pepper Snapple Group did not immediately return calls seeking comment.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Taking vitamin E and selenium supplements not only failed to prevent prostate cancer in men, a new study finds that daily vitamin E pills appear to raise the risk of the disease. The study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , is yet another reminder that the effect of dietary supplements on health isn't always rewarding or even innocuous. The SELECT study (which stands for Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial) began in 2001 and recruited more than 35,000 men age 50 and older at 400 study sites nationwide.
HEALTH
July 11, 2005 | Elena Conis
A decade ago, vitamin E earned a reputation as a potent heart disease- and cancer-preventing antioxidant. Studies showed a lower risk of heart disease in people who took vitamin E supplements or got lots of the vitamin from their diets, and animal and lab research suggested that the vitamin prevented fat from building up in blood vessels. The essential, fat-soluble vitamin is crucial for healthy eyes and skin and a robust immune system.
SCIENCE
July 6, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Vitamin E supplements, taken by millions of Americans as a potential cure-all, do not prevent heart disease and stroke in most women, but may provide some protection among those over age 65, according to a major new study involving nearly 40,000 women. Vitamin E capsules are widely recommended by cardiologists for heart disease prevention because such antioxidants are thought to prevent the buildup of plaque in arteries.
HEALTH
March 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Large doses of vitamin E -- widely touted as an elixir of youth -- do not protect against heart attacks and cancer and might actually raise the risk of heart failure in people with diabetes or clogged arteries, researchers have found. The study, published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is just the latest to cast doubt on the safety and effectiveness of vitamin E supplements and other antioxidants.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | From Associated Press
A diet rich in vitamin E foods such as nuts and whole grains can lower the risk of lung cancer among smokers by about 20%, a new study says. In the study of more than 29,000 male smokers in Finland, researchers found that those who had high blood levels of alpha-tocopherol, the main form of vitamin E, reduced their incidence of lung cancer by 19% to 23%.
NEWS
April 24, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In the latest of a remarkable string of new findings about the prevention or slowing of Alzheimer's disease, researchers report today that either vitamin E or a common anti-Parkinson's drug can significantly delay the deterioration of daily functioning caused by the debilitating disease. It is the first time that researchers have been able to slow the progression of the disease in patients who have already developed significant symptoms.
SCIENCE
November 11, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writers
High doses of vitamin E, often viewed as a panacea for cancer, heart disease and other illnesses, actually increase the risk of death slightly among the elderly and infirm, researchers said Wednesday. A study found that the increased risk of death was small, about 5% for those who had taken larger doses of the vitamin for at least five years. But vitamin E is taken by so many people -- an estimated 25% of the American population -- that even a small increase is significant, the researchers said.
HEALTH
November 8, 2004 | Sally Squires, Special to The Times
Although the flu has gotten all the publicity thanks to the unexpected shortage of this year's vaccine, influenza is just one of many diseases that pounce during the winter months. The good news: There are plenty of other ways -- such as eating right -- to help reduce the risk of annoying and sometimes dangerous illnesses. And none of these measures involves waiting in long lines, winning a vaccine lottery or taking a quick trip to Canada.
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