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Vitamin E

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1995
New research at USC adds to the evidence that taking Vitamin E can reduce the risk of heart disease. In a study of 156 men with heart disease, researchers found that taking daily doses of Vitamin E for two years appeared to slow the development of fatty deposits, or plaque, in coronary arteries. "It's hard to say that it's preventive--that's what we hope is going to be the bottom line," said Dr.
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NEWS
April 13, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a surprising study that casts doubt on the health benefits of antioxidant vitamins, a team of Finnish and American researchers has found that supplements of Vitamin E and beta carotene do not protect smokers against lung cancer--as previous studies have shown--and that beta carotene may in fact raise the risk of cancer among smokers.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | THERESE IKNOIAN, Iknoian is a San Jose-based free-lance health and fitness writer
We hedge our bets with all kinds of insurance policies. We insure our homes, cars, children, husbands, wives, boats, skis and dogs. Heck, dancers even insure their legs. So how about a policy that insures good health? Insurance against cancer, heart disease, cataracts, diabetes, high cholesterol, Parkinson's disease, arthritis and all those ailments that have been accepted as a scourge of aging in today's world. A dream? As of now, yes. But some researchers are on the trail of what they say has the potential to protect us--at least partially--against those diseases.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
Daily doses of beta carotene, Vitamin E and selenium reduced cancer deaths by 13% in a study conducted in rural China by U.S. researchers, who caution that the results may not apply to the United States, where people eat a more well-balanced diet. The five-year study, involving 29,584 people in an area where cancer rates are among the highest in the world, showed that some vitamins and minerals can be of benefit against cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute researchers.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Herbert M. Evans was baffled. The year was 1922 and the UC Berkeley scientist was tinkering with the diet of his laboratory rats. It seemed that a mysterious substance in the wheat germ oil he was feeding them helped the rodents reproduce. "Factor X," he dubbed it. He hadn't the foggiest notion what it was. And so it happened that Evans and colleague Katharine S. Bishop stumbled upon what was to become one of the most overlooked developments in modern medicine: the discovery of Vitamin E.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In studies that bolster theories about the link between vitamins and clogged arteries, Harvard University researchers report that people who take massive daily doses of Vitamin E have a significantly reduced risk of heart disease--although they caution that it is still too soon to recommend widespread use of the vitamin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers at Salk Institute and UC San Diego announced Thursday that they have discovered one possible cause of the cell death that occurs in the brains of victims of Alzheimer's disease. The work of three researchers from the Salk Institute and one from UCSD also reveals that Vitamin E can inhibit the death of nerve cells caused by a protein that accumulates in the brains of those suffering from Alzheimer's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1988 | Compiled from Staff and Wire Reports
A new study reports Vitamin E appears to bolster the immune systems of elderly men and women, a finding that suggests the vitamin may help people fend off infections and other diseases as they age. In the study, Dr.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
One or two capsules of Vitamin E daily can at least partially reverse the decline in immunity that normally occurs during aging and thereby might make it easier for the elderly to fight off disease, a researcher from the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Department of Agriculture nutritionist Simin N.
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