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Vitamin

NEWS
September 9, 2010
High doses of B vitamins can reduce shrinkage of the brain that is frequently a precursor of Alzheimer's disease, British researchers reported Wednesday. In the best circumstances, the supplements reduced shrinkage by as much as 50%, and researchers hope that this may mean that the vitamins can delay the onset of Alzheimer's. A longer trial is now being planned to determine if that is the case. The results are all the more remarkable because of the widely publicized failures of many experimental Alzheimer's treatments.
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SCIENCE
September 2, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Consumers who buy organic fruits and vegetables because they think they're tastier, more nutritious and better for the environment are getting at least some of what they're paying for, according to a study published online Wednesday. The finding is based on a detailed comparison of organic and conventional strawberries from 13 pairs of neighboring farms in Watsonville, Calif., where 40% of the state's strawberry crop is produced. A team of ecologists, food chemists, soil scientists and other experts analyzed a variety of factors before concluding that the organic berries — and the dirt they were raised in — were superior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Frank C. Garland, the UC San Diego epidemiologist who, with his brother Cedric, was the first to demonstrate that vitamin D deficiencies play a role in cancer and other diseases, died Aug. 17 at UCSD Thornton Hospital. He was 60 and had been suffering for nearly a year from cancer of the esophageal junction. "Over the past three decades, the Garlands' seminal hypothesis has been largely confirmed by numerous additional studies," Dr. Edward Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health said in a statement.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
HIV-positive women who are breastfeeding should not be given vitamin A supplements because it increases the risk of transmitting the AIDS virus to their infants, researchers said Thursday. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV has been largely controlled in the United States and other developed countries through the use of antiretroviral drugs, but is a major problem in the developing world. In 2008, there were 430,000 new HIV infections in infants, most of them in sub-Saharan Africa, and breast feeding accounted for more than 95% of them.
HEALTH
August 16, 2010 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like all industries, the herbal weight-loss business moves in cycles. Less than a decade ago, the stimulant herb ephedra was one of the stars of the scene. It sped up metabolism and weight loss, but it also raised the heart rate and, in some cases, caused strokes and heart attacks. The Food and Drug Administration banned ephedra supplements in 2004, setting off an industrywide scramble to find another herb that could take its place. For now, the winner seems to be green tea. Its reputation as a healthful, revitalizing beverage goes back thousands of years, and it has recently started showing up in a wide range of weight-loss supplements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Thomas C. Peebles, a World War II bomber pilot who isolated the measles virus, setting the stage for development of the vaccine that freed the world from the deadly scourge, died July 8 at his home in Port Charlotte, Fla. He was 89. Peebles also led a team that showed the tetanus vaccine could be given every decade instead of every year, developed a way to add fluoride to children's vitamins to prevent tooth decay and founded one of the country's...
HEALTH
August 2, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
For more than 20 years, I was plagued with dry, flaky skin on the side of my nose and behind my earlobes. I went to several doctors, including dermatologists. We tried various salves, to no avail. I wondered if this ailment was caused by a fungus. As a chemist, I know that iodine is very effective on fungus. I applied tincture of iodine with my fingers (every two days for a week) and got cured within a week. It's been two months, and the spots have not returned. I previously had success treating toenail fungus with iodine.
NEWS
July 20, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
More young adults are having weight-loss surgery these days in order to prevent obesity-related diseases like diabetes and improve their quality of life. Obese young women especially may be advised to undergo the surgery in order to improve fertility and avoid well-document complications in pregnancy that can plague obese women. But a possible complication has arisen in this strategy that women should know about. Australian doctors reported Friday on a case in which a woman who had obesity surgery — specifically, biliopancreatic diversion — developed severe vitamin deficiencies in pregnancy and gave birth to a child who is blind.
SCIENCE
March 15, 2010 | By Shari Roan
Raising the amount of vitamin D in the blood appears to help some people -- at least those deficient in the vitamin -- reduce their risk of heart disease by about 30%, researchers announced Monday. The findings, though preliminary, support further investigation of the interplay between vitamin D and heart health. Observational studies have linked heart disease with low vitamin D levels in the blood. In recent years, studies have shown that as many as three-quarters of Americans have a concentration in their blood that is under the normal level of 30 nanograms per milliliter.
HEALTH
March 1, 2010 | Lony Castro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I never actually intended to harm anyone. Honestly. In fact, I think the waiter is to blame. I was dining at a restaurant with my sister when the waiter casually asked if I was enjoying the evening with my daughter . I tried to shrug off the comment off but couldn't. I decided to get a second opinion and soon found myself walking into the office of a plastic surgeon. I entered through a marbled anteroom centered with a pedestal table and a stunning, if stiff, floral arrangement.
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