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Vitamins

NEWS
February 4, 1998 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Women who consume more than the recommended dietary allowances of folic acid and vitamin B-6 appear to cut their heart disease risk nearly in half, according to a 14-year Harvard study of 80,000 healthy middle-age women. The difference in heart disease risk between the highest and lowest intakes of the vitamins was comparable to that between smokers and nonsmokers, said the lead author, epidemiologist Eric Rimm of the Harvard School of Public Health.
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NEWS
July 2, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerald Kessler, founder of a dietary supplement company and a driving force behind the campaign to limit regulation of the industry, swears that there is "a worldwide conspiracy" to eliminate vitamins, minerals, amino acids and herbal products. "This is going on in every country," Kessler said. "It is the pharmaceutical-medical combine trying to make sure they are not being threatened worldwide by inexpensive, non-patented dietary supplements that will prevent the onset of chronic disease."
BUSINESS
May 6, 2000 | Associated Press
Two U.S. and two German drug companies agreed to plead guilty and pay $33 million in fines for participating in a conspiracy to fix the price of vitamins sold worldwide, the Justice Department said. In criminal cases filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas, the department charged that Nepera Inc., based in Harriman, N.Y., and Reilly Industries Inc. of Indianapolis conspired to raise the price and control the supply of vitamin B3, also known as niacin.
NEWS
November 27, 1993 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress adjourned Friday without imposing a moratorium on the Food and Drug Administration's plan to restrict the sale of vitamins and dietary supplements that promise more results than the government believes is warranted. As a result, the FDA is free to promulgate formal regulations on Dec. 15 dictating the kinds of claims that manufacturers may make to sell vitamins and food supplements.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | RONALD S. MILLER
Perhaps no other subject arouses as much acrimony among nutritional authorities as vitamin and mineral supplementation. Firmly entrenched on one side are the skeptics who, like researchers at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, call supplementation "a questionable and potentially harmful practice." On the opposing side stand the apologists, who claim that taking megadoses of vitamins and minerals can extend the life span and boost the body's immune system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1990 | REBECCA KOLBERG, Kolberg is a health writer for United Press International
Tales of Vitamin A toxicity are often bizarre, centering on Arctic explorers eating huge amounts of polar bear liver or fitness fanatics gobbling handfuls of vitamin supplements. But Americans should be aware that more subtle overloads of Vitamin A might pose some serious health risks, particularly to pregnant women, children and the elderly, federal nutrition experts say.
HEALTH
May 22, 2006 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
Her childbearing years are decades behind her, but Barbara Koblin, a 59-year-old L.A. business owner, still takes a prenatal multivitamin. She takes a handful of other supplements too, is careful about her diet and, at the supermarket, buys a few of those products enhanced with added vitamins and minerals. "I just made the decision on my own that more is better," Koblin says. When it comes to some vitamins, however, too much of a good thing can be a bad thing.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1991 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Dean South was making more than $75,000 a year as a senior product marketing manager at the computer division of Toshiba America Information Systems in Irvine when he decided to veer out of the fast lane and take the road to Shangri-La. South, 35, quit his 11-year computer industry career in May to go into business for himself. On Monday, he opened the Shangri-La vitamin and health food store at Jamboree Center in Irvine.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Soft-drink distributor Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. said it would soon begin selling vitamin-enhanced versions of Diet Coke and Dasani water in an effort to win back drinkers who have cut back on sugary sodas. The Atlanta-based company will soon introduce vitamin-fortified Dasani Plus water, H2Odwalla fruit-flavored vitamin waters and Diet Coke Plus, Chief Executive John Brock said.
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