Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVitamins
IN THE NEWS

Vitamins

BUSINESS
March 24, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jay Patrick, just shy of his 83rd birthday, goes to work every day in offices cluttered with electronic gadgetry and books and articles about health and nutrition. A sofa bed in one corner is always open so he can take his daily 22-minute nap. The founder and president of a 23-year-old Irvine company that makes vitamins and other food supplements counted the late Linus Pauling among his friends. In fact, he credits the Nobel-prize winning chemist with getting him into his line of work.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 23, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Starting this summer, the makers of vitamins and dietary supplements will have to do something they've never done before: verify that what they sell is real. On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that starting in late August, manufacturers in the $22-billon-a-year industry must conduct tests to show that their products contain all the ingredients on the label -- nothing more and nothing less. Companies must also keep records of consumer complaints.
NEWS
November 14, 1987 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
Rekindling an old debate, researchers at the University of Wisconsin have concluded that large doses of Vitamin C may reduce the severity of the common cold. Elliot Dick, a professor of preventive medicine, presented his team's findings this week at an international symposium on medical virology in Anaheim.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration warned physicians Friday that three patients receiving intravenous feedings have died recently due to a lack of Vitamin B1, and the agency urged doctors to make sure such liquid diets are supplemented with the essential vitamin. A multivitamin preparation usually added to intravenous feedings is in short supply because a Chicago manufacturer, Lyphomed Inc., had to cut production after the FDA ordered a recall in July of some of the company's product.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1988 | Associated Press
At the Energy Pool bar in the heart of Tokyo's business district, office workers worn out by the daily grind are seeking a solution at the bottom of a bottle--a tonic bottle. A fixture at drugstores and kiosks in commuter stations, tonics are the kick that refreshes the hard-working Japanese, famous for toiling long hours and shunning paid holidays. Taking a tonic here is not like popping open a cola for breakfast or sneaking a nip at lunch in the United States.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
A promising approach to preventing cancer with the help of vitamins and other nutrients has produced mixed results in two new studies: They found that two forms of Vitamin A helped prevent certain oral tumors but had no effect on the recurrence of skin cancers. The studies, reported today in The New England Journal of Medicine, are among the first to explore so-called chemo-prevention--the use of nutrients and drugs to try to delay the development of lung, colon, breast and other cancers.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Edward Handcock is a faithful patron of Mrs. Gooch's natural food emporium in Redondo Beach, a true believer in the restorative powers of fish oil--and a foot soldier in the "vitamin wars" of the 1990s. The 82-year-old Torrance resident is a willing recruit in the army of consumers who have gone to bat for the $4-billion-a-year dietary supplement industry in its battle with the federal government over regulation of everything from beta carotene to shark cartilage.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two European giants in the vitamin industry agreed Thursday to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay a record $725 million in fines for conspiring to fix and inflate vitamin prices around the world in the 1990s. The scheme, said Justice Department officials, reached into virtually every American household through the artificial inflation of prices for over-the-counter dietary supplements and fortified products such as cereal and cattle nutrients.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2000 | MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four former executives of European vitamin companies agreed Thursday to plead guilty, pay fines and serve time in U.S. prisons for scheming to fix the prices of an alphabet soup of vitamins around the world during the 1990s, the Justice Department said. In four criminal cases filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas, the department charged three former BASF executives and one former F. Hoffmann-LaRoche Ltd.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are being subjected daily to unproven and potentially dangerous health claims made by dietary supplements, the Food and Drug Administration said in a study released Thursday. The agency cited more than 500 examples of fraudulent claims about vitamins and other dietary supplements--including mineral, herbal and ammino acid products. "When consumers see a health claim for a dietary supplement, they assume it will provide the benefit it touts," FDA Commissioner David A.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|