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Vitamins

BUSINESS
May 21, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two European giants in the vitamin industry agreed Thursday to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay a record $725 million in fines for conspiring to fix and inflate vitamin prices around the world in the 1990s. The scheme, said Justice Department officials, reached into virtually every American household through the artificial inflation of prices for over-the-counter dietary supplements and fortified products such as cereal and cattle nutrients.
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BUSINESS
April 7, 2000 | MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four former executives of European vitamin companies agreed Thursday to plead guilty, pay fines and serve time in U.S. prisons for scheming to fix the prices of an alphabet soup of vitamins around the world during the 1990s, the Justice Department said. In four criminal cases filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas, the department charged three former BASF executives and one former F. Hoffmann-LaRoche Ltd.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are being subjected daily to unproven and potentially dangerous health claims made by dietary supplements, the Food and Drug Administration said in a study released Thursday. The agency cited more than 500 examples of fraudulent claims about vitamins and other dietary supplements--including mineral, herbal and ammino acid products. "When consumers see a health claim for a dietary supplement, they assume it will provide the benefit it touts," FDA Commissioner David A.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What do you do when your company is hamstrung by a pile of debt and shrinking margins in an industry rattled by price fixing, bad publicity and sluggish growth? If you're Gale Bensussen, you reach for the stomach medication. Then you turn it into a hot-selling product. The president of Carson-based Leiner Health Products Inc., one of the world's leading manufacturers of vitamins and supplements, is now moving the firm aggressively into over-the-counter medications.
SCIENCE
May 18, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
There's no evidence that multivitamins do healthy adults much good, but the supplements don't seem to do much harm either, a federal panel said Wednesday. Concluding a three-day conference convened by the National Institutes of Health, the panel called for further studies of multivitamins. Half of adults in the U.S. take multivitamins, helping to push annual sales of nutritional supplements to $23 billion. Dr. J.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Roche Holding and BASF, which last week agreed to pay record U.S. fines totaling $725 million for conspiring to fix global vitamin prices, may also face stiff European Union fines, EU Competition Commissioner Karel Van Miert suggested. A resolution to the EU's own investigation is still months away, however, and Van Miert would not say which companies the EU may fine. Roche, Europe's fourth-biggest drug maker, agreed last week to pay $500 million--the largest U.S.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Elton Gallegly, who says his total dietary supplement intake is Vitamin C when he feels a cold coming on, has become a champion of the $4-billion industry in its high-profile battle to minimize new labeling requirements. The Simi Valley Republican has staked out a position that is even more aggressive than that of the supplement industry's two leading congressional advocates, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.).
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House ended an intensely fought battle between the dietary supplement industry and its critics Friday by approving a measure that guarantees consumers' continued access to the products but also preserves the government's right to regulate claims used to sell them.
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Senate committee approved legislation Wednesday that would delay the imposition of new Food and Drug Administration restrictions on the nutritional claims made by vitamin manufacturers. Rejecting a more restrictive proposal by its chairman, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee instead approved legislation sponsored by Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) on a 12-5 vote.
NEWS
August 13, 1997 | JAMIE TALAN, NEWSDAY
Last year, when Dr. Gloria De Carlo Massaro published a study suggesting that vitamin A could be used to grow lung tissue in newborn rats, phones rang off the hook from desperate patients seeking a cure for emphysema. Sorry, she said, human studies are years away, and tinkering with this particular vitamin could be dangerous. She and her colleagues at the Georgetown University School of Medicine have spent the last year doing studies on adult rats with emphysema-like damage in their lungs.
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