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Vitamins

BUSINESS
April 7, 2000 | MICHAEL J. SNIFFEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Four former executives of European vitamin companies agreed Thursday to plead guilty, pay fines and serve time in U.S. prisons for scheming to fix the prices of an alphabet soup of vitamins around the world during the 1990s, the Justice Department said. In four criminal cases filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas, the department charged three former BASF executives and one former F. Hoffmann-LaRoche Ltd.
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NEWS
July 30, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are being subjected daily to unproven and potentially dangerous health claims made by dietary supplements, the Food and Drug Administration said in a study released Thursday. The agency cited more than 500 examples of fraudulent claims about vitamins and other dietary supplements--including mineral, herbal and ammino acid products. "When consumers see a health claim for a dietary supplement, they assume it will provide the benefit it touts," FDA Commissioner David A.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What do you do when your company is hamstrung by a pile of debt and shrinking margins in an industry rattled by price fixing, bad publicity and sluggish growth? If you're Gale Bensussen, you reach for the stomach medication. Then you turn it into a hot-selling product. The president of Carson-based Leiner Health Products Inc., one of the world's leading manufacturers of vitamins and supplements, is now moving the firm aggressively into over-the-counter medications.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
Roche Holding and BASF, which last week agreed to pay record U.S. fines totaling $725 million for conspiring to fix global vitamin prices, may also face stiff European Union fines, EU Competition Commissioner Karel Van Miert suggested. A resolution to the EU's own investigation is still months away, however, and Van Miert would not say which companies the EU may fine. Roche, Europe's fourth-biggest drug maker, agreed last week to pay $500 million--the largest U.S.
NEWS
January 2, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Elton Gallegly, who says his total dietary supplement intake is Vitamin C when he feels a cold coming on, has become a champion of the $4-billion industry in its high-profile battle to minimize new labeling requirements. The Simi Valley Republican has staked out a position that is even more aggressive than that of the supplement industry's two leading congressional advocates, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.).
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House ended an intensely fought battle between the dietary supplement industry and its critics Friday by approving a measure that guarantees consumers' continued access to the products but also preserves the government's right to regulate claims used to sell them.
HEALTH
November 2, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Female fertility can be a mysterious business. No matter how carefully a woman tracks her ovulation or times her romantic encounters, there's no guarantee that a baby will be on the way. Women who have trouble conceiving get lots of free advice: Relax, take a cruise, try different intercourse positions, etc. But could the solution lie in a supplement? Two companies promise to boost female fertility through blends of herbs, vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. The ingredient list for FertilityBlend for Women, manufactured by Daily Wellness Inc., includes the herb chasteberry ( Vitex agnus-castus )
SPORTS
January 26, 1985 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
To Olympic cyclist Thurlow Rogers, blood doping is only part of a much larger problem faced these days by athletes in all sports. That problem, according to Rogers, who was sixth in the men's Olympic road race at Mission Viejo last summer, revolves around which artificial stimuli to athletic performance are going to be accepted, which are going to be banned, and which it is actually feasible to ban. Rogers--one of 16 members of the 24-member U.S.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One might think Robert and Herbert Haft--the son and father who led the big retailer Dart Group until their nasty public feud ultimately drove the business into the ground in the '90s--would quietly enjoy their remaining fortunes in welcome, tranquil obscurity. But that's not the Hafts. Robert Haft, 47, now runs a company called Vitamins.com that combines an Internet site, 10 bricks-and-mortar stores, a toll-free telephone number and a catalog to peddle vitamins and health supplements.
NEWS
July 22, 1989
Sigmund Miller, author of "LifeSpan Plus," offers the following advice on taking vitamin-mineral supplements: Be sure to inform your doctor. Certain vitamins interfere with the action of medications. L-dopa, used to treat Parkinson's disease, is reduced by taking Vitamin B-6. Take your supplements with or shortly after a meal. This ensures a higher rate of absorption of the micronutrients. Never gulp down a handful of pills with a glass of water and think of this as a meal.
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