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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Thomas C. Peebles, a World War II bomber pilot who isolated the measles virus, setting the stage for development of the vaccine that freed the world from the deadly scourge, died July 8 at his home in Port Charlotte, Fla. He was 89. Peebles also led a team that showed the tetanus vaccine could be given every decade instead of every year, developed a way to add fluoride to children's vitamins to prevent tooth decay and founded one of the country's...
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HEALTH
August 2, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
For more than 20 years, I was plagued with dry, flaky skin on the side of my nose and behind my earlobes. I went to several doctors, including dermatologists. We tried various salves, to no avail. I wondered if this ailment was caused by a fungus. As a chemist, I know that iodine is very effective on fungus. I applied tincture of iodine with my fingers (every two days for a week) and got cured within a week. It's been two months, and the spots have not returned. I previously had success treating toenail fungus with iodine.
SCIENCE
March 15, 2010 | By Shari Roan
Raising the amount of vitamin D in the blood appears to help some people -- at least those deficient in the vitamin -- reduce their risk of heart disease by about 30%, researchers announced Monday. The findings, though preliminary, support further investigation of the interplay between vitamin D and heart health. Observational studies have linked heart disease with low vitamin D levels in the blood. In recent years, studies have shown that as many as three-quarters of Americans have a concentration in their blood that is under the normal level of 30 nanograms per milliliter.
HEALTH
January 25, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
These days, it's not difficult to consume 600% of your daily recommended value of B vitamins or 2,000% of the recommended amount of vitamin C -- all before lunchtime. Many energy bars, juices and other products are crammed with sky-high levels of vitamins. Gulp down an Odwalla Blueberry B Monster smoothie and get 360% of the daily value of four types of B vitamins. Swallow a shot of Emergen-C and you could get more than 1,600% of the daily value of vitamin C. That's not necessarily good.
HEALTH
January 4, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
I am 62 years old and just had my second bone-density test. I was told I have osteopenia and should take Boniva. I have been lactose-intolerant, so I avoid dairy products. I have tried calcium, but it makes me constipated. I took Actonel but developed leg cramps. I took one Boniva tablet the nurse gave me as a sample, but I now have unbearable indigestion. Is there anything natural I can take? Osteopenia is a controversial condition. The concept of pre-osteoporosis was created somewhat arbitrarily in 1992 for research purposes rather than to guide treatment.
SPORTS
December 8, 2009 | By Mark Medina
Clippers center Chris Kaman had too much energy to sleep. But he didn't have enough energy to stay active and avoid lying around at home watching his DVD collection. Kaman had enough energy to remain on the team's active roster. But he didn't have enough energy to replicate the string of seven consecutive games earlier this season in which he scored at least 20 points. Kaman missed practice Nov. 12, but it wasn't until two weeks ago during a doctor's visit when he discovered why he felt listless: doctors diagnosed he was deficient in Vitamin D, which increases the flow of calcium into the bloodstream and helps prevent bones from becoming brittle.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By John Keilman and Tara Malone
The dairy industry recently rolled out an expensive media campaign in praise of chocolate milk, a classic school lunch drink that's under assault for its sugar content. As trade groups spend upward of $1 million to defend the drink, three fifth-graders have come to its rescue. A year after the school district in Barrington, Ill., banned flavored milk from its elementary- and middle-school lunch menus, students persuaded administrators to give it another chance. "Kids weren't drinking the white milk," said Haley Morris, 10. "It's better to have the chocolate milk than nothing."
NATIONAL
November 16, 2009 | By John Keilman and Tara Malone
The dairy industry recently rolled out an expensive media campaign in praise of chocolate milk, a classic school lunch drink that's under assault for its sugar content. But as trade groups spend upward of $1 million to defend the drink, three fifth-graders have come to its rescue. A year after the school district in Barrington, Ill., banned flavored milk from its elementary- and middle-school lunch menus, the students persuaded administrators to give it another chance. "Kids weren't drinking the white milk," said Haley Morris, 10. "It's better to have the chocolate milk than nothing."
IMAGE
November 15, 2009 | Alene Dawson
Pumpkins and cranberries in the supermarket signal the beginning of the holiday season. As it happens, these two festive foods also provide a feast for your skin. Savvy spas and beauty product manufacturers are capitalizing on the autumnal bounty to help customers develop a fetching glow. For instance, the Four Seasons Hotel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills offers a fruit and pumpkin enzyme peel, and Verabella Skin Therapy (also in Beverly Hills) is showcasing what it calls the "Fall on Your Face" facial with pumpkin.
HEALTH
November 9, 2009 | Emily Sohn
It's not hard to get all of your daily needs from nonmeat sources, nutritionists say, but it takes thought and planning -- plus a few tricks. No matter how old your vegetarian kids are, the first step is to educate yourself on healthful alternatives to animal products, such as hummus, tofu, quinoa and legumes. When vegetarian teens live in a meat-eating family, they should also take some of the responsibility for preparing vegetarian meals, says nutritionist and epidemiologist Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, of the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, so that the entire burden doesn't fall on parents.
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