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Vitelic Corp

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BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to ensure a future supply of a scarce computer memory chip, Irvine-based Western Digital Corp. has invested $2 million in a Silicon Valley chip manufacturer. Western Digital's investment was part of $39 million in financing raised by Vitelic Corp. of San Jose to build a chip manufacturing plant in Taiwan. The Taiwan plant, scheduled for completion in 1990, will produce 1-megabyte DRAM chips, which can store 1 million bytes of information on a single chip. Vitelic is one of the few U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Where does the U.S. electronics industry go from here, following the collapse of U.S. Memories, a proposed $350-million joint venture of the nation's biggest computer and semiconductor companies to produce basic memory chips? The idea behind U.S.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Where does the U.S. electronics industry go from here, following the collapse of U.S. Memories, a proposed $350-million joint venture of the nation's biggest computer and semiconductor companies to produce basic memory chips? The idea behind U.S.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to ensure a future supply of a scarce computer memory chip, Irvine-based Western Digital Corp. has invested $2 million in a Silicon Valley chip manufacturer. Western Digital's investment was part of $39 million in financing raised by Vitelic Corp. of San Jose to build a chip manufacturing plant in Taiwan. The Taiwan plant, scheduled for completion in 1990, will produce 1-megabyte DRAM chips, which can store 1 million bytes of information on a single chip. Vitelic is one of the few U.S.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Six makers of computer memory chips have agreed to pay $173 million to settle accusations made by the attorneys general of California and 32 other states that they conspired to fix prices globally, officials said Thursday. The attorneys general alleged that the companies had schemed to keep prices of dynamic random access memory chips from falling. The companies included in the settlement, which must be approved by federal and state courts in California, included U.S.-based NEC Electronics America Inc. and Micron Technology Inc. Others were Infineon Technologies of Germany, Hynix Semiconductor Inc. in South Korea, Elpida Memory Inc. of Japan and Mosel-Vitelic Corp.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Intel, vowing to protect its "intellectual property," on Wednesday launched a barrage of patent infringement litigation against Korea's Hyundai conglomerate and a group of U.S. distributors and designers of Hyundai semiconductor products. Intel filed suit in U.S. District Court in San Jose and asked the U.S. International Trade Commission for an exclusion order banning the importation of Hyundai semiconductor products.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
New York's attorney general sued leading makers of memory chips Thursday, claiming that they made secret price-fixing arrangements that inflated the cost of personal computers and other electronic devices. More than 30 other states were expected to file a separate lawsuit today in U.S. District Court in San Francisco, California Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer said.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Brimming with cash and eager for a hunt, the tiny country of Taiwan is embarking on an investment binge. Destination: U.S. companies looking for cash. The timetable may be gradual and the early forays small, but this nation the size of West Virginia is swimming in money and is starting to spend it overseas--not just on automobiles and refrigerators, but increasingly on savings and loans, retail outlets and financially strapped U.S. electronics firms. Overseas investing is a new and somewhat uncomfortable activity for Taiwan, a shadow nation not officially recognized by the United States.
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