Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVito Acconci
IN THE NEWS

Vito Acconci

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
New York conceptual and performance artist Vito Acconci offers shelter from the storm. He appears here in two sets of massive tough 'n' tender sculpture, one shaped like shellfish, the other like brassieres. The artist makes fun of his own heroic scale in engaging fashion. Giant clams are plastic, encrusted with real shells, inset with lights, hinged with hardware as big around as a child's wrist and lashed to the floor as if they might run off.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the current issue of Granta, Bernard Cooper publishes an excerpt from his memoir “My Avant-Garde Education,” which is due out next year. Cooper , of course, is a memoirist and fiction writer ( “Guess Again,” “The Bill From My Father” ) of uncommon subtlety and nuance, who uncovers in the quietness of personal experience the tumult of being alive. Born and raised in Los Angeles, he's a quintessential local voice, working from out of what D.J. Waldie calls our “sacred ordinariness,” portraying the city not as mythic landscape but as a place where people live.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Two Moon July." Pacific Arts. $39.95. Using the format of a technical rehearsal at the Kitchen performance space in New York, this hourlong potpourri of East Coast avant-garde activity offers a little music by Philip Glass and Laurie Anderson, brief dances by Molissa Fenley and Bill T.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2003 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Pasadena's newest shopping mall seems an unlikely home for the first permanent installation in Southern California of noted conceptual artist Vito Acconci. But as a piece of public art that doubles as a public bench, it's a logical extension of the work in public spaces he's been pursuing for the last 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1987
The Vito Acconci artwork proposed for San Diego is an important sculpture deserving approval by the port commissioners. This . . . "user-friendly" piece . . . by an important American artist who has been recognized internationally will add considerably to the local scene. The entire process of invitation, presentation and selection for this work was a model of order and democracy. The Arts Advisory Committee represents a perfect balance of informed citizenry: the chairman, a noted industrial designer; the director of an internationally known museum of contemporary art; the curator of an innovative sculpture collection at UC San Diego; the contemporary sculptor trained in architecture; the arts writer who has worked for the arts for over two decades, and a layman.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the current issue of Granta, Bernard Cooper publishes an excerpt from his memoir “My Avant-Garde Education,” which is due out next year. Cooper , of course, is a memoirist and fiction writer ( “Guess Again,” “The Bill From My Father” ) of uncommon subtlety and nuance, who uncovers in the quietness of personal experience the tumult of being alive. Born and raised in Los Angeles, he's a quintessential local voice, working from out of what D.J. Waldie calls our “sacred ordinariness,” portraying the city not as mythic landscape but as a place where people live.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
No one would expect to be charmed by an artist who made his reputation doing self-obsessed performances. But when Vito Acconci's off-putting early work is compared with his more recent efforts--in a 20-year survey at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, through Aug. 2--he seems to have become quite gregarious. He builds houses, rooms, chairs and lounges--friendly objects that we associate with warmth and comfort.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2003 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
Pasadena's newest shopping mall seems an unlikely home for the first permanent installation in Southern California of noted conceptual artist Vito Acconci. But as a piece of public art that doubles as a public bench, it's a logical extension of the work in public spaces he's been pursuing for the last 20 years.
NEWS
August 18, 1988
Five samples of artwork proposed for the Third Street Promenade shopping mall are on display for public review and comment until Sept. 6. The samples, displayed at 1345 3rd St., represent the work of five artists who were chosen as finalists in a competition called "Art on the Promenade." The winner will be awarded $450,000 to design, construct and install artwork on the promenade's center island and two gateways at Broadway and Wilshire Boulevard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
AS the Museum of Modern Art's refurbished and expanded building continues to pack in crowds in New York, the museum is reaching out to a young audience on the Internet. MoMA's teen website, Red Studio -- launched last year with an interview with artist Vito Acconci -- has a batch of new features designed to encourage 13- to 19-year-olds to spend some time with modern and contemporary art. What do you find if you visit www.moma.org/redstudio?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
New York conceptual and performance artist Vito Acconci offers shelter from the storm. He appears here in two sets of massive tough 'n' tender sculpture, one shaped like shellfish, the other like brassieres. The artist makes fun of his own heroic scale in engaging fashion. Giant clams are plastic, encrusted with real shells, inset with lights, hinged with hardware as big around as a child's wrist and lashed to the floor as if they might run off.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
"Two Moon July." Pacific Arts. $39.95. Using the format of a technical rehearsal at the Kitchen performance space in New York, this hourlong potpourri of East Coast avant-garde activity offers a little music by Philip Glass and Laurie Anderson, brief dances by Molissa Fenley and Bill T.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
No one would expect to be charmed by an artist who made his reputation doing self-obsessed performances. But when Vito Acconci's off-putting early work is compared with his more recent efforts--in a 20-year survey at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, through Aug. 2--he seems to have become quite gregarious. He builds houses, rooms, chairs and lounges--friendly objects that we associate with warmth and comfort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1987
The Vito Acconci artwork proposed for San Diego is an important sculpture deserving approval by the port commissioners. This . . . "user-friendly" piece . . . by an important American artist who has been recognized internationally will add considerably to the local scene. The entire process of invitation, presentation and selection for this work was a model of order and democracy. The Arts Advisory Committee represents a perfect balance of informed citizenry: the chairman, a noted industrial designer; the director of an internationally known museum of contemporary art; the curator of an innovative sculpture collection at UC San Diego; the contemporary sculptor trained in architecture; the arts writer who has worked for the arts for over two decades, and a layman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2001
NEWPORT BEACH 11am-5pm Art From the personal to political, "American Stories" is an exhibit that features art prints from Orange County Museum of Art's permanent collection. Contemporary artists such as Vito Acconci, Hans Burkhardt, Leon Golub, Dolores Guerrero-Cruz, Lari Pittman, Robert Rauschenberg, Joe Bastida Rodriguez and Nancy Spero are among those on view. Between the 1960s and 1990s, prints became the medium of choice for artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Body of Work: Sharon Ryan's new works on paper at Remba have only the slightest physical presence, but the ramifications of their process run deep. Half of the small, lyrical images in the show were painted using the artist's blood and urine, the rest were "drawn" with strands of hair, both Ryan's and her friends'. As the title of the show implies, these are "Drawings--Of the Body," not just drawings of the body.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|