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Vitrification

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BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A technology akin to glassmaking is being adapted to permanently entomb several kinds of hazardous wastes. Glassification, or vitrification, as the technology is known--from the Latin word for glass--burns off organic wastes, breaking down such poisons as dioxin into harmless water and carbon dioxide. At the same time the process seals such inorganic wastes as heavy metals into a blue-black, glassy mass, isolating them indefinitely from water, air, soil and people.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A technology akin to glassmaking is being adapted to permanently entomb several kinds of hazardous wastes. Glassification, or vitrification, as the technology is known--from the Latin word for glass--burns off organic wastes, breaking down such poisons as dioxin into harmless water and carbon dioxide. At the same time the process seals such inorganic wastes as heavy metals into a blue-black, glassy mass, isolating them indefinitely from water, air, soil and people.
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NATIONAL
September 8, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The cost to build a huge waste treatment plant at the Hanford nuclear site rose to $12.2 billion as the Department of Energy announced the results of a new review by the Army Corps of Engineers. The plant is to convert millions of gallons of radioactive waste to glasslike logs for permanent disposal. The vitrification plant has long been considered the cornerstone of cleanup at the Hanford site but has been mired in cost overruns, construction problems and delays.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The cost to build a waste treatment plant at the highly contaminated Hanford nuclear reservation in south-central Washington has risen to $11.55 billion, according to a new cost estimate released by the U.S. Department of Energy. The vitrification plant is being built to convert millions of gallons of radioactive waste to glasslike logs for permanent disposal underground in a nuclear waste repository. The plant is considered the cornerstone of cleanup at the Hanford site.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1989 | From United Press International
The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a $550-million contract to UE&C Catalytic Inc. of Philadelphia to construct a facility that solidifies liquid nuclear waste. The waste vitrification plant will be built at the DOE's Hanford Reservation, a 560-square-mile nuclear facility near Richland, Wash. It is scheduled to begin operating by the year 2000.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1986
Fluor Corp., the Irvine-based engineering firm, said its Fluor Technology Inc. unit has received a $5-million contract from the Department of Energy for work on a radioactive waste preparation facility in Richland, Wash. A spokesman for the company said Fluor Technology will perform architect-engineering services based on the government's conceptual design for the plant, which will be used to fuse radioactive waste material into a special glass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988
Ogden Environmental Services' toxic waste incinerator is represented by project proponents as an "innovative" solution to the toxic waste treatment problem. Even opponents who raise serious questions about the safety of the Torrey Pines Mesa incinerator siting agree the technology is "sensible" if safely located. Both parties may be erroneous in assuming that the incineration process is an innovative and sensible technology. Alternative toxic waste treatments under review and development may explain why Ogden is acting with haste to conveniently risk a play with fire near a densely populated area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1996 | PETER D. ZIMMERMAN, Peter D. Zimmerman, a nuclear physicist, is a defense and arms control consultant
Safeguarding the nuclear genie is proving both more difficult and more contentious than anyone dreamed when the Cold War ended. For example, the Department of Energy has 50 tons of surplus plutonium, the raw stuff that makes nuclear weapons possible, to get rid of.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1996
In the beginning, on Aug. 20, 1942, the world's supply of plutonium consisted of a single speck, barely visible to the naked eye. The separation of plutonium from other materials at the University of Chicago under the direction of Glenn T. Seaborg was a turning point in the race to build a nuclear weapon, in hopes of bringing a swift end to World War II.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1994 | KATHLEEN WIEGNER
If an elderly friend tells you she hears the TV better with her glasses on, don't laugh. Visual clues are crucial to our ability to understand speech. That's why a team of researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz has created a computerized "talking head."
HEALTH
August 16, 2010 | By Judy Foreman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Freezing eggs for non-medical reasons — in which a healthy woman harvests and preserves her eggs for later conception — is new enough that there are few reliable statistics on the success of the procedure. "Success" in such cases means a take-home baby, not just an egg that is frozen without damage, or thawed safely or even fertilized to yield a genetically normal, healthy embryo. "So few women who have frozen eggs have come back to use them [that it's impossible] to quote a clear pregnancy rate on it," says Dr. Elizabeth Ginsburg, medical director of assisted reproductive technologies at Brigham and Women's Hospital.
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