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NEWS
January 27, 2010 | By Jason Gelt
In 1932, Winston Churchill, appalled by the leftover bones and gristle crowding his dinner plate, predicted that in 50 years "we shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing by growing these parts separately under a suitable medium." It's taken longer than that, but at the dawn of the 21st century we're finally closing in on tasty and eerily healthy meat grown by scientists instead of Old MacDonald. "It's been a thought problem for scientists for decades," says Jason Matheny, director of New Harvest, a nonprofit organization devoted to global efforts to produce cultured meat.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
About 10% of married couples suffer from infertility - the inability to conceive a child naturally. Through the better part of the 20th century, physicians considered this a minor and perhaps irrelevant problem, one that contributed overall to society by keeping the birthrate down. British biologist Robert Edwards thought differently. He was among the first to fully appreciate the frustration and depression the condition engendered in its victims and the benefits that could arise from reversing it. Along the way, he met resistance from religious conservatives who insisted that life must begin only through intercourse, not artificially, and from fellow scientists who resented the fact that he spoke frequently with the media about both his research and the ethical implications.
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NATIONAL
October 29, 2009 | Karen Kaplan
When couples with fertility problems turn to in vitro fertilization, they often assume that they can double their chances for a healthy baby by transferring two embryos to the womb instead of just one. But data published in today's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine show that what they're really doing is increasing their odds of having twins -- which is riskier for the mother and babies alike. In the early days of in vitro fertilization, doctors routinely transferred half a dozen embryos, or more, to boost the odds that at least one would grow into a healthy fetus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2012 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
Army Staff Sgt. Matt Kiel was shot while on patrol in Iraq just six weeks after his wedding. Doctors said he would be on a ventilator for the rest of his life and would never again move his arms or legs - dashing his hopes of raising a family. But within months of his injuries five years ago, Kiel was breathing on his own and had regained enough function in his left arm to operate a motorized wheelchair. Doctors said he and his wife, Tracy, could start a family through in vitro fertilization.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | From Times wire service s
The mother of "test tube" quadruplets wants three of the five-month-old babies adopted because she cannot cope with the stress of looking after them, health officials said today. They said Marie Charlesworth, who already had one child conceived by the in-vitro fertilization method, wanted to keep the baby girl and give up the three boys. The case has caused a storm in medical circles, with many doctors believing it underlines the need for regulation of the in-vitro fertilization profession.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | JACK SEARLES
The Oxnard unit of Vitro Corp. has received a $24.6-million contract to continue weapons systems work for the Port Hueneme Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, formerly known as NEMESIS. The five-year, follow-on order calls for Vitro to provide engineering services for such Navy weapons systems as the Tomahawk, Terrier, Tartar and Harpoon missiles. A Vitro spokeswoman said she did not expect the award to lead to new hiring. Vitro, a subsidiary of Penn Central Corp.
NEWS
October 15, 2009
Vetoed legislation: An article in Tuesday's Section A on bills acted on by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger included the wrong number for a measure he vetoed that would have created new oversight for clinics providing in vitro fertilization. The bill was SB 674, not SB 647.
NEWS
June 30, 1991
In the article entitled "TV Parenting" (TV Times, May 26), pediatrician Loraine Stern is quoted as saying, "Dr. Brazelton had a short segment about vision in babies, in which he showed an in vitro view of a fetus. That's an emotional thing to do. It was a good segment, but showing photos of a fetus can be taken as a subtle anti-abortion message." She goes on to say that parents need to be vigilant about subtle messages they are being given. For that statement, Loraine Stern deserves to be president of the Let's Not Confuse Us With the Facts Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1989
When David and Luz Barragan turned to in vitro fertilization five years into a childless marriage, they had no idea it would come to this. On Wednesday, the Guadalajara, Mexico, couple became the proud parents of a set of healthy quadruplets. Luz Adriana, Citali, Diego and David were born at 9:30 p.m. at UC San Diego Medical Center, according to a hospital spokeswoman. The newborns' weights ranged from 3 pounds to 3 pounds, 10.5 ounces. "I am very happy and relieved because there was a lot of risk," David Barragan said Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2000
The Irvine maker of testing products reported net income of $8,949 for the second fiscal quarter, down from $25,191 a year ago. Revenue for the quarter ended March 31 advanced slightly to $168,126 from $166,575.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When Lesley Brown's first child was born, there was no need to send out announcements. The news was blared on front pages around the world: "OUR MIRACLE," "BABY OF THE CENTURY," "IT'S A GIRL. " On July 25, 1978, Brown, a young woman from a working-class English town, gave birth to the first baby conceived outside the womb. Baby Louise Joy became a focus of international fascination as the first so-called test-tube baby, produced through in-vitro fertilization, a technique that raised moral and medical alarms 34 years ago but is commonplace today because of the more than 4 million women who have followed in Brown's steps.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A widow who conceived a baby from the sperm of her late husband is not automatically entitled to Social Security survivors benefits to help raise the child, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 decision rejected the claim that a biological child of a married couple, even one born years after the father died, always qualifies as his survivor under the Social Security Act. Instead, the justices upheld the government's multi-part definition of who deserves survivors benefits.
NATIONAL
May 21, 2012 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- A child who was conceived from the sperm of a father who had died is not automatically entitled to Social Security benefits as his survivor, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 decision upholds the government's multi-part definition of who qualifies as a survivor under the Social Security law. One requirement is that a “natural child” is one who is entitled to inherit the father's property under state law. “Tragic circumstances gave rise to this case,” said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, noting that Robert Capato died of cancer in Florida in 2002 before he and his wife, Karen, could have the family they envisioned.
NATIONAL
March 19, 2012 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court justices voiced doubt over whether children who are born of in vitro fertilization more than a year after the death of their father are entitled to his survivor's benefits under the Social Security Act. The dispute involves a clash over how to interpret the 1930s pension law in an era of sperm donors and modern fertility. In 1939, Congress added a provision to the Social Security Act to give benefits to the survivors of deceased wage earners, including children who were dependents.  But judges have been split in the past decade over who qualifies as a survivor under this law. At issue is whether mothers can claim benefits for children who were conceived after their father died.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court agreed to decide whether a child conceived through in vitro fertilization after a father's death was entitled to a Social Security survivor's benefit. At least 100 such claims are pending at the Social Security Administration while officials try to resolve how the Depression-era law should be interpreted in an era of modern reproductive technology. Since 1939, the Social Security system has provided a benefit to the family of a deceased wage earner, including his children.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Maternal mortality is rare. But the rates are increasing in the United States and elsewhere for a number of reasons. In an editorial published Thursday, British researchers point out that in-vitro-fertilization-related pregnancies are an additional risk factor for maternal death. The major causes of death to new mothers are rare catastrophes, such as hemorrhage and blood clots. The incidence of these problems is increasing, possibly because more pregnant women today have health problems, such as diabetes, obesity or some other chronic condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
The Beverly Hills fertility doctor who assisted Nadya Suleman in conceiving octuplets and six previous children said during testimony Wednesday that his goal with each pregnancy was to produce a single baby and that Suleman agreed to reduce the number of fetuses if the treatment were to result in multiple births. "We don't really intentionally want to make it a multiple pregnancy ? our goal is a single term pregnancy," said Dr. Michael Kamrava. "However, this is not an exact science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
The Beverly Hills fertility doctor who assisted Nadya Suleman in conceiving octuplets and six previous children repeatedly failed to screen her for mental health issues and to limit the number of embryos she had implanted, an expert witness testified Monday at a medical board hearing in Los Angeles. Dr. Michael Kamrava implanted Suleman with a dozen embryos before she conceived octuplets, an expert said at the hearing ? twice the number of embryos Suleman has said in the past. Kamrava could have his medical license revoked if it is determined that he was grossly negligent in his treatment of Suleman and two other female patients: a 48-year-old who suffered complications after she became pregnant with quadruplets and a 42 year-old diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer after receiving fertility treatments.
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