Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVitro Sa
IN THE NEWS

Vitro Sa

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Mendoza believes that free trade should benefit all Mexicans, not just the biggest corporations. That is why he and his brothers, David and Juan Bosco, owners of a $15-million-a-year company, have taken on giant Monterrey-based Vitro Corp., a conglomerate with $3 billion in revenues and subsidiaries in the United States. And that is why Mendoza will tell his story today in Houston to a U.S.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 10, 1989 | From Reuters
Vitro S.A., Mexico's largest glass company, announced a bid Wednesday of $20 a share, or about $280 million, for Anchor Glass Container Corp. of Tampa, Fla. Anchor's stock quickly jumped $7.50, or 61.2%, to $19.75 a share on the New York Stock Exchange, where it was the most active issue, with more than a third of its outstanding shares changing hands. Vitro said that if it succeeds in its bid, it would shut down at least three manufacturing plants and replace Anchor's top management.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking example of how U.S. and Mexican corporations are joining forces in anticipation of a North American free-trade pact, glassmakers Corning and Vitro agreed Tuesday to combine their consumer products operations into a joint venture expected to generate sales of $800 million a year. Such well-known Corning brands as Corning Ware, Pyrex, Revere Ware and Corelle will become part of the joint venture, along with Monterrey-based Vitro's stemware and glassware division, Vitrocrisa.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jose Mendoza believes that free trade should benefit all Mexicans, not just the biggest corporations. That is why he and his brothers, David and Juan Bosco, owners of a $15-million-a-year company, have taken on giant Monterrey-based Vitro Corp., a conglomerate with $3 billion in revenues and subsidiaries in the United States. And that is why Mendoza will tell his story today in Houston to a U.S.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest new commercial bank loan to a Mexican company since the Third World debt crisis began eight years ago, 16 international banks and an arm of the World Bank agreed Wednesday to lend glass-making giant Vitro $126 million for up to 10 years. In addition, the International Finance Corp., the World Bank unit that extends credit to private companies, said it will invest $10 million in the company's stock.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a striking example of how U.S. and Mexican corporations are joining forces in anticipation of a North American free-trade pact, glassmakers Corning and Vitro agreed Tuesday to combine their consumer products operations into a joint venture expected to generate sales of $800 million a year. Such well-known Corning brands as Corning Ware, Pyrex, Revere Ware and Corelle will become part of the joint venture, along with Monterrey-based Vitro's stemware and glassware division, Vitrocrisa.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Vitro S.A. of Mexico said today it is extending until next Thursday the expiration of its $280-million, $20-a-share, cash tender offer for Anchor Glass Container Corp., which has resisted the bid. Last month, the board of Tampa, Fla.-based Anchor Glass concluded Vitro's offer was inadequate and adopted a "poison-pill" anti-takeover plan. The matter is now before a Chancery Court in Delaware, where Anchor Glass is incorporated.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Mexico's Vitro S.A. made an unsolicited $280-million cash bid for Anchor Glass Container Corp. of Tampa, Fla., today, pushing the American company's stock sharply higher on the New York Stock Exchange. Analysts said the bid is unlikely to meet with opposition from other big U.S. glass companies. The $20-a-share offer launched by Vitro's indirect subsidiary, THR Corp., expires at midnight Sept. 7. Analysts said the ailing Anchor has been the subject of takeover speculation for some time.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest new commercial bank loan to a Mexican company since the Third World debt crisis began eight years ago, 16 international banks and an arm of the World Bank agreed Wednesday to lend glass-making giant Vitro $126 million for up to 10 years. In addition, the International Finance Corp., the World Bank unit that extends credit to private companies, said it will invest $10 million in the company's stock.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1989 | From Reuters
Vitro S.A., Mexico's largest glass company, announced a bid Wednesday of $20 a share, or about $280 million, for Anchor Glass Container Corp. of Tampa, Fla. Anchor's stock quickly jumped $7.50, or 61.2%, to $19.75 a share on the New York Stock Exchange, where it was the most active issue, with more than a third of its outstanding shares changing hands. Vitro said that if it succeeds in its bid, it would shut down at least three manufacturing plants and replace Anchor's top management.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Stock prices turned downward near the close of a turbulent session Wednesday, running into some resistance at or near record highs. Airline stocks extended their recent runaway rise, prompted by a bid for UAL Corp., and numerous other stocks jumped around in takeover-related trading. The Dow Jones index of 30 industrials, up more than 10 points in early trading, closed with a 13.09 loss at 2,686.08.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even among the towers of this city's tree-lined main boulevard, the new Mexican Stock Exchange Center stands out. Sharply sloping triangles form a backdrop for a glass dome. On the inside, the skylit trading floor is ringed with video monitors flashing price changes. Visitors watching the trading from a mezzanine balcony can listen to explanations in English or Spanish.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|