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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The veteran Italian directors Paolo and Vittorio Taviani ("Padre Padrone," "The Night of the Shooting Stars") encountered casting difficulties with their latest film - not from demanding divas or control-freak actors but from hardened criminals serving time in the high-security section at Rome's Rebibbia prison. Directed in a semi-documentary style in both black-and-white and color, "Caesar Must Die" revolves around the auditions, rehearsals and performance by the prison inmates of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1994 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
"Nostalgia doesn't interest us, but memory is a different matter," says Italian filmmaker Paolo Taviani, whose new movie, "Fiorile," made in collaboration with his brother Vittorio, travels into the past to tell a rural Italian folk tale that they hope sheds some light on life in Italy today. "Memory must be nurtured because coming to grips with the past makes it easier to decipher the reality we live in now."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1994 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
"Nostalgia doesn't interest us, but memory is a different matter," says Italian filmmaker Paolo Taviani, whose new movie, "Fiorile," made in collaboration with his brother Vittorio, travels into the past to tell a rural Italian folk tale that they hope sheds some light on life in Italy today. "Memory must be nurtured because coming to grips with the past makes it easier to decipher the reality we live in now."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The veteran Italian directors Paolo and Vittorio Taviani ("Padre Padrone," "The Night of the Shooting Stars") encountered casting difficulties with their latest film - not from demanding divas or control-freak actors but from hardened criminals serving time in the high-security section at Rome's Rebibbia prison. Directed in a semi-documentary style in both black-and-white and color, "Caesar Must Die" revolves around the auditions, rehearsals and performance by the prison inmates of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1991 | (Kevin Thomas), Compiled by Michael Wilmington
F ollowing are The Times' recommendations for today's schedule of the American Film Institute Los Angeles International Film Festival, with commentary by the film reviewing staff. Information: (213) 466-1767. Highly Recommended: "NIGHT SUN"(Italy/France/Germany; Paolo & Vittorio Taviani; Nuart, 6:45 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1998
Last week's Top 5 rentals: "Air Force One," "G.I. Jane," "The Game," "Conspiracy Theory" and "Nothing to Lose." Last week's Top 5 sellers: "Air Force One," "Hercules," "Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella," "Soul Food" and "Private Parts." What's New In stores this week: "The Edge" (Fox), action-adventure starring Anthony Hopkins and Alec Baldwin. (R) "The Man Who Knew Too Little" (Warner), spy satire starring Bill Murray. (PG-13).
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | From Reuters
Italian actor Gian Maria Volonte, whose roles ranged from Shakespeare to the bad guy in the spaghetti western "A Fistful of Dollars," has died at age 61. Volonte, who acted in more than 40 films in a 34-year career, was found dead Tuesday in his hotel room in the northern Greek town of Florina, where he was to appear in "The Gaze of Ulysses" by Greek director Theodoros Angelopoulos. Italian news reports said Volonte was believed to have suffered a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's "Fiorile" (AMC Fine Arts) is as passionate, lyrical and ravishingly beautiful as any film they have ever made. It has moments of pure enchantment, of exquisitely expressed emotion, and it is often fairly absorbing, although drawn-out. It is also faintly silly, as grand romantic sagas can so easily seem, and it doesn't travel as well as such Taviani masterpieces as "Padre Padrone" and "The Night of the Shooting Stars."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS
The Taviani Brothers' "Allonsanfan" (Beverly Center Cineplex) is a lyrical, tragicomic homage to a lost cause in all its grandeur and folly. Made in 1974--but inexplicably released only now--this ravishingly beautiful intimate epic not only ranks alongside the Tavianis' best, "Padre, Padrone" and "The Night of the Shooting Stars," but also affords Marcello Mastroianni one of those roles in which he excels, that of a charming, intelligent man driven to betrayal and hating himself for it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1989
By now, most of America's film critics have weighed the 1980s and sorted out the 10 films they considered the decade's best. But how about the best director and the best performances? The Times' Sheila Benson, Peter Rainer, Kevin Thomas and Michael Wilmington have submitted their five favorites in the four acting categories and their choices of the five best-directed movies of the decade.
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