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Viva Leroy Nash

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June 26, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano is a Times staff writer. He last wrote for the magazine about a troubled Muslim U.S. Army sergeant.
Deep in the iron bowels of Arizona's death row waits el tigre grandote. The big tiger turns 90 this year. He is the oldest condemned man in America, maybe the whole world. And like the wild beast he claims to embody, Viva LeRoy Nash wants to roam free. He awaits his release by the hand of God or the vengeance of man, whichever comes first, inside Cell 39. Nash has spent 65 years of his life in prison. Twice he has escaped, making his most recent dash for freedom at age 67.
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MAGAZINE
June 26, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano is a Times staff writer. He last wrote for the magazine about a troubled Muslim U.S. Army sergeant.
Deep in the iron bowels of Arizona's death row waits el tigre grandote. The big tiger turns 90 this year. He is the oldest condemned man in America, maybe the whole world. And like the wild beast he claims to embody, Viva LeRoy Nash wants to roam free. He awaits his release by the hand of God or the vengeance of man, whichever comes first, inside Cell 39. Nash has spent 65 years of his life in prison. Twice he has escaped, making his most recent dash for freedom at age 67.
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MAGAZINE
July 17, 2005
I wish to thank Sandra Kobrin for her story about the elderly inmates in our prison system ("Dying on Our Dime," June 26). She brought to light the necessity of relieving our system of the elderly, the dying, the infirm--the most costly of all prison inmates. With compassionate release, they could get much better care with their families or at residential care homes. This could save millions of taxpayer dollars. The dollars saved could much better serve the needs of other inmates, and help provide better healthcare, rehabilitation programs, drug and mental health treatment, education and practical training.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
On the day Jared Lee Loughner was indicted for the shootings in Tucson, the top federal prosecutor in Arizona signaled that the government most likely would request the ultimate punishment. But the federal death penalty process is filled with obstacles, and Loughner's execution would be far from assured if he is convicted. Most defendants initially targeted for death are more likely to spend their lives in prison. Of 182 federal death penalty prosecutions approved by Washington since 1988, 60 defendants are on death row, and only three ?
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