Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVivaldi
IN THE NEWS

Vivaldi

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1998 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An entire evening devoted to the music of Vivaldi would strike some as too much of a good thing. But Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra made it a worthy pursuit Friday at Pasadena's First United Methodist Church. Lutenist and music director Michael Eagan steered mostly into unknown waters, choosing from the Italian composer's 700-plus works a number of his more neglected items.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2009 | Chris Pasles
A potted plant falls from the heights onto the UCLA Royce Hall stage, galvanizing nine meditative, heavily cloaked Ballet Preljocaj dancers into action. They throw off their weighty covers, glory momentarily in their youthful nakedness, turn upstage to don colorful briefs and muscle shirts, and begin yelping and hooting as they cavort to the music of Vivaldi. Spring has sprung, with a vengeance. So begins Angelin Preljocaj's "Les 4 Saisons . . . ," an 85-minute fantastic excursion through the Red Priest's most famous score, intercut with periods of silence and movements from other, unidentified Vivaldi concertos, including some of the weirder music that the 18th century Venetian composer wrote.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2001 | Chris Pasles
* * * * VIVALDI: Late Violin Concertos Giuliano Carmignola, violin; Venice Baroque Orchestra, Andrea Marcon, conductor Son These six, never-before recorded concertos (according to Sony) date from Vivaldi's last years, when the composer abandoned widespread publication in favor of limited distribution to patrons. It paid off handsomely in the short term but was a disaster as far as making these works well-known. A pity because Vivaldi's imagination had never been higher.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | David Ng
Call it a musical homecoming more than 275 years in the making. Antonio Vivaldi's "Motezuma," first performed in 1733 in Venice, was long considered a lost opera, its score having vanished, like so many other works of that era, into the void of history. But in 2002, a German musicologist discovered an incomplete copy in Berlin, and since then various reconstructed versions of "Motezuma" have been performed across Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2009 | Chris Pasles
A potted plant falls from the heights onto the UCLA Royce Hall stage, galvanizing nine meditative, heavily cloaked Ballet Preljocaj dancers into action. They throw off their weighty covers, glory momentarily in their youthful nakedness, turn upstage to don colorful briefs and muscle shirts, and begin yelping and hooting as they cavort to the music of Vivaldi. Spring has sprung, with a vengeance. So begins Angelin Preljocaj's "Les 4 Saisons . . . ," an 85-minute fantastic excursion through the Red Priest's most famous score, intercut with periods of silence and movements from other, unidentified Vivaldi concertos, including some of the weirder music that the 18th century Venetian composer wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1988 | RICHARD JENSEN
I l prete rosso himself--the red-haired priest, as Vivaldi was known to his contemporaries--might well have blessed the Parley of Instruments for its performance at Beckman Auditorium on Saturday. The Vivaldi program featured soloists Paul O'Dette, lute and mandolin, and Stanley Ritchie, Baroque violin, in a concert of familiar works in unfamiliar settings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2005
I wonder, does classical music deter street crime only, or is it effective against white-collar crime too ["Halt, or I'll Play Vivaldi!" Feb. 13]? What kind of music did the Enron executives listen to in their personal lives? Classical music has a similar effect on me as prayer -- it brings out my better self. Perhaps when your ears are filled with the musical virtues of harmony, balance, intelligence, gracefulness and true passions, on a deep unknowable level you cannot then sustain your commitment to carrying out a criminal act. I hear Mozart and Vivaldi playing hour after hour in the homes of the hotspots of violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
The Nicholas McGegan Express rolled across the causeway Thursday night and pulled into the Venice station, the second stop on its four-city "Grand Tour" of Europe at the Hollywood Bowl. Hitching onto this train was a neat concept for beating the August blues at the Bowl -- with the jolly, grinning elf of a conductor swaying back and forth at the controls in his animated wiggle-waggle way.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES
Choreographer Mark Morris has abandoned his recent irony and returned to his unique sense of musicality to create "Maelstrom," which is receiving its premiere performances this week by the San Francisco Ballet at the War Memorial Opera House. Only this time, as seen Wednesday, his much-admired musical talents have turned out an odd and unsatisfactory work, although the company dances it well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- When a musician from the southern Czech Republic stumbled upon an anonymous score, he knew it was the long-lost opera "Argippo" by Italian baroque composer Antonio Vivaldi. Ondrej Macek, 36, a harpsichordist and conductor from Cesky Krumlov, then decided to bring the opera back to Prague, where it had opened 278 years ago. The 2008 premiere will be attended by hundreds of Vivaldi's fans at Prague Castle tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2008 | Rick Schultz, Special to The Times
Stravinsky once dismissed Vivaldi's music as "the same concerto 400 times. " But he might have had second thoughts after hearing the Akademie fur Alte Musik Berlin on Friday at Royce Hall, where this period music ensemble, founded in 1982, presented a refreshingly provocative program as part of UCLA Live's classical series. The Akademie sandwiched three little-known Baroque composers -- Alessandro Marcello, Johann Gottlieb Graun and Philipp Heinrich Erlebach -- between the major innovators of that era's concerto repertory: Vivaldi and Bach.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
The Nicholas McGegan Express rolled across the causeway Thursday night and pulled into the Venice station, the second stop on its four-city "Grand Tour" of Europe at the Hollywood Bowl. Hitching onto this train was a neat concept for beating the August blues at the Bowl -- with the jolly, grinning elf of a conductor swaying back and forth at the controls in his animated wiggle-waggle way.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2007 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The sudden illness of a key soloist almost derailed the plans of the 10th annual International Laureates Festival, conceived by Laura and Eduard Schmieder, which culminated in a program by the iPalpiti Orchestral Ensemble on Thursday at the Walt Disney Concert Hall. But the resilience of Eduard Schmieder, who conducted, and the prizewinning musicians, ages 19 to 32 and from around the world, prevailed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2007 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Vivaldi's ubiquitous "Four Seasons" has charmed many of us to sleep about this composer. But the Venice Baroque Orchestra's program Sunday at Walt Disney Concert Hall woke us up to Vivaldi's gorgeous, prodigal invention, occasional waywardness and sometimes downright weirdness. It was wonderful. Director and harpsichordist Andrea Marcon led his 12-member group in a program of seven Vivaldi string and violin concertos and one Tartini violin concerto.
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | Lynne Heffley
The Classical Kids Collection, Volume 1 Classical Kids Digital/ The Children's Group 4-CD set: $60.49 Ages: 5 to 12 www.childrensgroup.com Classical Kids began intertwining imagination-stirring composer- and history-based original tales with excerpts from classical masterpieces years ago; the critically acclaimed results, in which children and composers figure at the heart of each story, are just as enthralling today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | BY DEBRA CANO and MIMI KO CRUZ and JULIO V. CANO and JOHN CANALIS and LISA ADDISON
The choir at the Community Congregational United Church of Christ, which is celebrating its centennial, will perform Antonio Vivaldi's "Gloria" in honor of the holidays. The free performance is at 10 a.m. Sunday at the church, 4111 Katella Ave. It will feature 22 singers and an organist. Information: (562) 425-4139 or (714) 527-2343.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
A choral work recently reattributed to Italian Baroque master Antonio Vivaldi after centuries of being wrongly ascribed to one of his contemporaries received its first modern performance Tuesday in Australia. The manuscript was found in the Saxon State Library in Dresden, Germany, by Janice Stockigt, a musicologist at Melbourne University who was in her final week of a five-year research project into sacred music in the German royal court.
NEWS
August 24, 2006 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
LIKE a postmodern ketchup, or figs, Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" goes with anything these days. Play the concertos on guitars, kotos, saxophones if you like. It's already been years since Gilles Apap manically completed Vivaldi's set with Jewish tunes, Irish reels and a "schizoid whistler" and since Gidon Kremer served up an arresting "Seasons" mix of Vivaldi and tango master Astor Piazzolla. At the Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night, Vivaldi got seasoned with salsa.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A Vivaldi opera that has not been performed officially for several centuries will be featured at this summer's Festival of the Two Worlds in the Umbrian hill town of Spoleto, Italy, organizers said Monday. American conductor Alan Curtis, who said he has been working on the opera for more than 10 years, will lead the Baroque Ensemble in the first performance since 1723 of "l'Ercole su'l Termodonte."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|