Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVivian Malone Jones
IN THE NEWS

Vivian Malone Jones

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Vivian Malone Jones, one of two black students whose effort to enroll at the University of Alabama led to Gov. George Wallace's 1963 "stand in the schoolhouse door," died Thursday. She was 63. Jones, who went on to become the first African American to graduate from the school, died at Atlanta Medical Center, where she had been admitted Tuesday after suffering a stroke, said her sister, Sharon Malone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Vivian Malone Jones, one of two black students whose effort to enroll at the University of Alabama led to Gov. George Wallace's 1963 "stand in the schoolhouse door," died Thursday. She was 63. Jones, who went on to become the first African American to graduate from the school, died at Atlanta Medical Center, where she had been admitted Tuesday after suffering a stroke, said her sister, Sharon Malone.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Forty years ago this week Gov. George C. Wallace tried to block the admission of two black students to the all-white University of Alabama. Wallace's defiant "stand in the schoolhouse door" failed to keep out minorities: With about 19,600 students, Alabama's student body is now 13% black. This week, the university will hold a three-day observance for the anniversary of Wallace's infamous stand. Honorees include the two black students who faced him that day -- Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Forty years ago this week Gov. George C. Wallace tried to block the admission of two black students to the all-white University of Alabama. Wallace's defiant "stand in the schoolhouse door" failed to keep out minorities: With about 19,600 students, Alabama's student body is now 13% black. This week, the university will hold a three-day observance for the anniversary of Wallace's infamous stand. Honorees include the two black students who faced him that day -- Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
The last time George C. Wallace and Vivian Malone Jones laid eyes on each other, he was governor and she was a young black woman he was trying to keep out of the University of Alabama with his "stand in the schoolhouse door." Thirty-three years later, she and Wallace, a sickly shadow of the 1960s segregationist, met again Thursday night before Jones received an award, named in memory of Wallace's wife, that recognizes women who made major improvements in the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
James A. Hood, one of two black students whose effort to enroll at the University of Alabama in June 1963 led to Gov. George Wallace's segregationist "stand in the schoolhouse door" and who later forged an unlikely friendship with the former governor, has died. He was 70. Hood, who left the university after eight weeks but returned years later to earn a doctorate there, died Thursday at his home in Gadsden, Ala., northeast of Birmingham, according to a funeral home official. The June 11, 1963, enrollment of Hood and Vivian Malone, who went on to become the first black graduate of the university, came during one of the most violent summers of the civil rights movement.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
The last time George C. Wallace and Vivian Malone Jones laid eyes on each other, he was governor and she was a young black woman he was trying to keep out of the University of Alabama with his "stand in the schoolhouse door." Thirty-three years later, she and Wallace, a sickly shadow of the 1960s segregationist, met again Thursday night before Jones received an award, named in memory of Wallace's wife, that recognizes women who made major improvements in the state.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|