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Vivian Wu

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NEWS
October 17, 1993 | MONIQUE MONTIBON, Monique Montibon is a Southern California-based writer
This year has been a productive one for actress Vivian Wu, who this week is featured in "Danielle Steele's Message From Nam" on NBC. The actress, recently named one of the 50 "most beautiful people in the world" by People magazine, also has prominent roles in the current "The Joy Luck Club" and in Oliver Stone's upcoming "Heaven and Earth." The flurry of activity couldn't make her happier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Since opportunities in movies for actors of Asian descent remain relatively scarce, it's all the more disappointing that Anna Chi's "Blindness" is such a bummer, especially since it stars the distinguished and versatile Lisa Lu and the lovely and capable Vivian Wu. It's a glum, stale soap opera, tediously paced but mercifully running only 75 minutes, its sole virtue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Since opportunities in movies for actors of Asian descent remain relatively scarce, it's all the more disappointing that Anna Chi's "Blindness" is such a bummer, especially since it stars the distinguished and versatile Lisa Lu and the lovely and capable Vivian Wu. It's a glum, stale soap opera, tediously paced but mercifully running only 75 minutes, its sole virtue.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | MONIQUE MONTIBON, Monique Montibon is a Southern California-based writer
This year has been a productive one for actress Vivian Wu, who this week is featured in "Danielle Steele's Message From Nam" on NBC. The actress, recently named one of the 50 "most beautiful people in the world" by People magazine, also has prominent roles in the current "The Joy Luck Club" and in Oliver Stone's upcoming "Heaven and Earth." The flurry of activity couldn't make her happier.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1998
Last week's Top 5 rentals: "Conspiracy Theory," "Nothing to Lose," "Soul Food," "The Game" and "Con Air." Last week's Top 5 sellers: "Soul Food," "Sleeping Beauty," "Jungle Book," "Belle's Magical World" and "Leave It to Beaver." What's New In stores this week: "Hercules" (Disney, $27), Disney's latest animated musical comedy featuring the voices of Tate Donovan, James Woods and Danny DeVito. Rated G.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the elegant, seductive "Shadow of China" (at Cineplex Odeon Showcase) director Mitsuo Yanagimachi, in his English-language debut, plays old Hollywood-style romance against brutal recent events most effectively in a modern-day "Casablanca" of complexity and ambiguity. No film comes to mind in which Hong Kong, that most intoxicating of cities in its density, exotic glitter and spectacular vistas, has been used to such dramatic effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the unsophisticated, bittersweet "Iron & Silk" (AMC Century 14), Mark Salzman plays himself (more or less) as an all-American innocent arriving alone in immense and impenetrable China. Enchanted by kung-fu movies from the age of 11, Salzman grew up to major in Chinese language and literature at Yale. In 1982, he landed his first job after graduation from college teaching English to adults in Hunan (Hangzhou in the film).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Gary Goldstein
More successful when mining its DePalma-esque tale of a red-dressed avenging angel than during its flatter romantic or domestic moments, first-time feature writer-director Oscar Luis Costo's "Shanghai Red" largely emerges as a tantalizing, involving thriller. A coolly enigmatic Vivian Wu ("The Joy Luck Club," "The Pillow Book") stars as Meili Zhu, a widow whose husband was killed as a result of a business venture gone bad, the specifics of which are intriguingly saved for last. Motivated by honor and guilt, Meili dons an assumed identity - a high-end call girl dubbed Shanghai Red - and sets out to murder her late mate's alleged assassins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1989 | LEONARD KLADY
Patrick Swayze plays the title role in Paramount's "Ghost," to film locally and in NYC in July for director Jerry Zucker. Writer Bruce Joel Rubin's fantasy-comedy casts Swayze as a bank exec whose accidental death was the work of a supposed friend now eyeing his job and gal. But the late exec hopes to foil those plans through a charlatan medium. Producers Lisa Weinstein and Steve Jaffe are negotiating with Whoopi Goldberg for the latter role. . . . John Lone goes "Stalking Tigers" in Hong Kong with his "Last Emperor" wife Vivian Wu and Brit actress Sammi Davis later this month.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | KEVIN ALLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
T ear - jerker has been the word on the street about Hollywood Pictures' new release, "The Joy Luck Club," based on Amy Tan's 1989 best-selling novel. Apparently the studio agrees, because Disney employees were handing out complimentary packages of Kleenex at Saturday night's invitational screening in Westwood. The evening's major glitch occurred when Richard Gere and Cindy Crawford made their entrance at the after-party at the Armand Hammer Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Despite its arresting visual style, its wave after wave of creative and hypnotic images, "The Pillow Book," as its name hints, slowly but inexorably leads to sleep. Written and directed by Peter Greenaway, "The Pillow Book" is more coherent and plotted than his last film, the understandably little seen "The Baby of Macon."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Greenaway's "8 1/2 Women" is a nod to Fellini--and that "half" turns out to be a typically dark Greenaway twist. No artistic temperaments could be more different than those of Greenaway and Fellini. Greenaway is the detached, pitiless intellectual whose magistral experimental flourishes can be recondite in the extreme, whereas Fellini is the lyrical, compassionate sensualist who celebrates the beauty of the women in his all-encompassing embrace.
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