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NEWS
August 12, 1996
I enjoyed Robin Abcarian's "When Two Visions of One City Collide" (July 28), in which she quotes Pomona Councilwoman Nell Soto stating that "Latinos are far better off in Pomona than they once were." I grew up in that city during the '40s and vividly remember people of color being allowed use of the public pool only on Thursday because Friday the water was changed. And not too many Mexicans ventured north of Holt, especially after dark. We all need more Sotos to keep history in perspective for us--especially those who constantly cry about being "victimized."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2011 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Peter Gent, who turned his vivid memories of a five-year career as a wide receiver with the Dallas Cowboys into the blisteringly candid bestselling novel "North Dallas Forty," has died. He was 69. Gent, a standout basketball player at Michigan State University in the early 1960s, died Friday at his home in Bangor, Mich., of complications from pulmonary disease, according to the D.L. Miller Funeral Home in Bangor. Despite being drafted by the old Baltimore Bullets of the NBA, Gent chose football over basketball after college.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1985
The article in The Times (Oct. 9), "Soviet Cotton Harvest: Job for Children," illustrates their shameful practice of removing Soviet children from school to hand-harvest cotton. This article brought back vivid memories of my childhood years in Texas during the 1950s. It was common practice for the local school authorities to close black schools from late August to late October to allow black children to help in the cotton harvest. In the Soviet case there was a makeup period; in our case there was no makeup for time lost from school.
WORLD
February 6, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The witness has grown old and sick. He sits propped on pillows while the snow piles up outside. Recovering from a stroke, he languishes in a cramped apartment because his legs are too frail to negotiate five flights of stairs. His name is Alexei Vaitsen. He is one of the few Jews to survive the torments of the Nazis' Sobibor death camp and the only member of his family who lived to see the end of World War II. His thoughts these days are hundreds of miles away, in a distant courtroom where the fate of another sick old man is being weighed.
NEWS
December 3, 1987
In the early 1940s, when I was a student at Franklin High School in nearby Highland Park, I heard that any Negro found on the streets of Glendale after dark would be arrested. When I worked for a title insurance company in this county, deed restrictions limiting ownership of Glendale properties to "white" people often came to my attention. In the period following World War II, whole blocks of Glendale property owners, fearful of "racial disintegration," recorded covenants to bar black ownership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1985 | DAVID FREED and MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writers
Alberto Leos was frying hamburgers at McDonald's when James Oliver Huberty began killing people. Leos hid in the back and said he watched 30 agonizing minutes tick off the employee time clock before Huberty finally found him, shot him four times and left him for dead. A year later, the wiry, athletic Leos, 18, has virtually recovered from his wounds, but his bitterness over the time it took San Diego police to kill Huberty has hardly ebbed.
NEWS
February 20, 2003
Your beautiful piece on your writing class at the Central Juvenile Hall ("What you learn when love is taken away," Feb. 13)was extremely touching. I have been a teacher of high school-age youth for over 30 years in Los Angeles. Your column brought back vivid memories. I hope, and suspect, that most of the young boys appreciate your sensitivity, compassion, caring and determination. Robert Wood Manhattan Beach As I prepare for my day as a high school English teacher at a highly regarded L.A. magnet school with children of privilege, I contemplate your article.
OPINION
August 11, 2007
Re "Letters from Mindanao," Opinion, Aug. 6 David Smollar brought back some vivid memories of Aug. 6, 1945, the day the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. My family spent the war years in the Philippines under Japanese rule. We were liberated in February 1945, and by the end of July we were on a troop ship back to the United States. I was 13 years old and playing with my two younger sisters when an announcement came that an atom bomb had been dropped in Japan.
OPINION
May 25, 2002
"Versed in Traffic Control" (May 18), on haiku and horn-sounding in Brooklyn, reminded me of many annoying honkings I've experienced. In the late 1950s I lived in New York City, and one of my vivid memories is of honking. At a traffic signal, as soon as the light turned green, cars behind the first one started to honk. I was amazed when I returned to California and found that a driver was given several seconds before a polite beep was heard. In travels to India I was always annoyed by horn-honking.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | DOUG ADRIANSON
American folklore hums with the romance of hopping a midnight boxcar on a freight train bound for glory. But back in the 1930s, riding the rails was a grim way of life for many who had lost jobs, homes, even families to the Great Depression. Now, the American History Project wants to hear from those who spent childhood or teen-age years wandering. A documentary film on the era is in the works, and all stories are welcome.
SPORTS
November 28, 2007 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
A young Jeff Fisher slumped in front of his locker, head down. The USC defensive back had just let an interception slip away, into the hands of UCLA running back Freeman McNeil, for a long touchdown that gave the Bruins a 20-17 victory in the 1980 game. Fisher was disconsolate, so the school's sports information director, Tim Tessalone, approached him carefully. "Jeff, you don't have to do this," Tessalone said. "But all the media want to talk to you."
OPINION
August 11, 2007
Re "Letters from Mindanao," Opinion, Aug. 6 David Smollar brought back some vivid memories of Aug. 6, 1945, the day the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. My family spent the war years in the Philippines under Japanese rule. We were liberated in February 1945, and by the end of July we were on a troop ship back to the United States. I was 13 years old and playing with my two younger sisters when an announcement came that an atom bomb had been dropped in Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
Dora Lubensky can't forget the man soaked with blood who collapsed on her doorstep, pleading, "Let me in! Let me in!" She called 911. The operator's orders frightened her more: "Don't let him in. Get away from the window, lay down and stay out of sight." A decade has passed since that morning of Feb. 28, 1997, but the memories are fresh for the North Hollywood residents and business owners and the police who lived through the bank robbery that left 11 officers and seven civilians wounded.
SPORTS
March 30, 2006 | Debbie Goffa, Times Staff Writer
The headline is a stopper: "Angels Clout Nine Homers, Win 22-5." It was June 22, 1957, and Roger Osenbaugh still remembers every pitch. He should. He was the opposing pitcher. "It's the best memory I have," he said of the game between the Sacramento Solons and the Los Angeles Angels at Wrigley Field, which stood at 42nd Street and Avalon Boulevard and was the West Coast copy of the Chicago Cubs' home. "Twenty-two runs, 18 earned runs, nine home runs, five home runs in one inning," he recalled.
SPORTS
April 3, 2005 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
When it was happening, Marques Johnson didn't know how lucky he was. When his UCLA basketball coach, John Wooden, would stop practice to make sure his socks were straightened, Johnson rolled his eyes the way any 18-year-old boy would. "But he did that," Johnson says, "to make sure the socks didn't cause blisters."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2003 | Li Fellers, Times Staff Writer
To her clients, Juli Armitage was a wedding photographer with style. The Santa Monica photographer, with a background in fashion shoots and glossy magazines, catered to upscale nuptials and commanded fees as high as $3,600 per wedding. Armitage's promotional material said she was all about "capturing the moment." But authorities allege that she actually defrauded some newlyweds and deprived them of those captured moments on film.
SPORTS
July 8, 2000
Harry Usher was at his best during the times leading up to the 1984 Olympics. For those of us who worked at the LAOOC, Harry was a firm but fair leader. His untimely death has left us all shaken. One of my most vivid memories of the LAOOC occurred about a month before the Games, when Harry asked me and several others to join him at the Coliseum for a demonstration by ABC. They were hoping to use a new "sky-camera" during the Games. The ABC executives introduced the engineer who had designed the gadget, and he explained how it was a computer-controlled and programmed to go anywhere in the space over the Coliseum's playing field.
SPORTS
November 9, 1987 | Associated Press
The Seattle Seahawks have vivid memories of what the New York Jets did to them last year. A 38-7 rout by the Jets in the Kingdome served as an incentive for the Seahawks as they prepared for tonight's game against slumping New York. "It was an embarrassment," Seahawk Coach Chuck Knox said. "I don't believe you have to mention it, but I think it behooves an intelligent person to profit from history." History had been kind to the Seahawks against the Jets.
NEWS
February 20, 2003
Your beautiful piece on your writing class at the Central Juvenile Hall ("What you learn when love is taken away," Feb. 13)was extremely touching. I have been a teacher of high school-age youth for over 30 years in Los Angeles. Your column brought back vivid memories. I hope, and suspect, that most of the young boys appreciate your sensitivity, compassion, caring and determination. Robert Wood Manhattan Beach As I prepare for my day as a high school English teacher at a highly regarded L.A. magnet school with children of privilege, I contemplate your article.
SPORTS
November 22, 2002 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
You may have seen the videotape over the years and, if not, you'll no doubt get another chance this week to savor "The Play," the California Bears' wild-eyed run into college football history. The 20th anniversary of Cal's helter-skelter dash for the Stanford end zone arrives this week and, as one who was there, I am here to say: Check out the videotape that will make the sports highlight shows this week. Listen to the sports blooper-style descriptions that spill off the commentators' tongues.
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