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Vivitar Corp

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BUSINESS
February 23, 1993
Vivitar Corp.'s parent company is still looking for a buyer for the Chatsworth-based camera maker now that the proposed sale of Vivitar to Concord Camera Corp. has collapsed. Gestetner Holdings PLC of Britain, which purchased Vivitar and the Australian-based Hanimex photographic-products business in early 1990, had planned to sell them to Concord for $51 million in cash and Concord stock. But Concord, an Avenel, N.J.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 1998 | BARBARA MURPHY
Douglas E. Howe has been appointed president of Vivitar Corp. in Newbury Park. Howe joined Vivitar in 1997 as vice president and general manager of the digital imaging division. Before that, he was vice president for marketing of digital products at Olympus America Inc. Vivitar designs and develops photographic, optical, electronic and digital imaging products at offices in the United States, France, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore and the United Kingdom.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
After fleeing Hitler's Germany in 1938, Max Ponder and John Best emigrated to Los Angeles and began selling camera accessories out of their car. Ponder was the salesman, and when he convinced a camera store to buy equipment, he would fetch the products from the car trunk. Best, the businessman, would write the invoice in the back seat. Their partnership, Ponder & Best, eventually became Vivitar Corp.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1993
Vivitar Corp.'s parent company is still looking for a buyer for the Chatsworth-based camera maker now that the proposed sale of Vivitar to Concord Camera Corp. has collapsed. Gestetner Holdings PLC of Britain, which purchased Vivitar and the Australian-based Hanimex photographic-products business in early 1990, had planned to sell them to Concord for $51 million in cash and Concord stock. But Concord, an Avenel, N.J.
NEWS
February 1, 1996
Julius S. Katz, 73, former president of Vivitar Corp. who helped develop it into an international dealer in photographic products. A native of New York City and graduate of Brooklyn College, Katz earned a Distinguished Flying Cross for his military service during World War II. He spent more than 30 years with Vivitar, retiring in 1986 to devote his time to assisting immigrant children, and working in the Nature Conservancy and the Wilderness Society. On Jan. 23 in Brentwood of a brain tumor.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992
Vivitar Corp. in Chatsworth and two other camera makers have agreed to pay a total of $11.4 million to settle patent-infringement lawsuits filed against them by Honeywell Inc., Honeywell said Monday. The out-of-court settlements were negotiated separately with Vivitar, Ricoh and Chinon, but Minneapolis-based Honeywell declined to disclose the amounts paid by each company. Honeywell filed the suits early this year in federal court in Newark, N.J.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The affordable cameras made by Vivitar Corp. are well-known to consumers, but getting a clear picture of Vivitar's own prospects is a tough call these days. That's because the Chatsworth-based company, whose 35-millimeter cameras remain one of the dominant brands in the United States, is in the process of being sold for the third time in six years. Vivitar, after being owned by an Australian firm and now by a British concern, is supposed to be sold to tiny Concord Camera Corp. of Avenel, N. J.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1986 | DANIEL AKST
PerfectData said it ousted founder C. Paul Davis as president and chief executive and replaced him with Lee R. Mannheimer. "The board felt PerfectData's operations really hadn't improved the way they should have," said Richard M. Drysdale, chairman of the Chatsworth computer accessories concern. Mannheimer, 43, worked for Vivitar Corp. in Santa Monica for 10 years, most recently as vice president and general manager of Vivitar Computer Products.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The affordable cameras made by Vivitar Corp. are well-known to consumers, but getting a clear picture of Vivitar's own prospects is a tough call these days. That's because the Chatsworth-based company, whose 35-millimeter cameras remain one of the dominant brands in the United States, is in the process of being sold for the third time in six years. Vivitar, after being owned by an Australian firm and now by a British concern, is supposed to be sold to tiny Concord Camera Corp. of Avenel, N. J.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992
Vivitar Corp. in Chatsworth and two other camera makers have agreed to pay a total of $11.4 million to settle patent-infringement lawsuits filed against them by Honeywell Inc., Honeywell said Monday. The out-of-court settlements were negotiated separately with Vivitar, Ricoh and Chinon, but Minneapolis-based Honeywell declined to disclose the amounts paid by each company. Honeywell filed the suits early this year in federal court in Newark, N.J.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1988 | JAMES F. PELTZ, Times Staff Writer
After fleeing Hitler's Germany in 1938, Max Ponder and John Best emigrated to Los Angeles and began selling camera accessories out of their car. Ponder was the salesman, and when he convinced a camera store to buy equipment, he would fetch the products from the car trunk. Best, the businessman, would write the invoice in the back seat. Their partnership, Ponder & Best, eventually became Vivitar Corp.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1999
Robert S. Messina has been named president and chief operating officer of Troy Group Inc. in Santa Ana. He was previously executive vice president of the company and chief operating officer of Troy Systems International, a subsidiary. Before joining the company in 1994 as vice president of sales and marketing, Messina was general manager of Omninote and Western regional vice president for Dictaphone Corp. * Brent F.
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