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BUSINESS
December 24, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
In just under eight years, Vizio Inc. has gone from a no-name brand to the nation's top seller of LCD televisions. Now the Irvine company has set its sights on becoming the largest consumer electronics company as it quietly rolls out such home entertainment gadgets as speakers, Blu-ray players, headphones and even Internet routers. FOR THE RECORD: Vizio: An article in the Dec. 25 Business section about TV maker Vizio Inc.'s branching into other types of consumer electronics said that most of the company's 300 employees work in sales.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
LAS VEGAS - Local resident Tony Holdip stood admiring the latest technological lust object on display at the world's largest consumer electronics show as a friend joined a crowd of amateur photographers snapping pictures of the immense 110-inch Samsung TV. "This is unbelievable," Holdip said, and commented on the set's brightness and image clarity. "The only problem I can see with this is it's possibly too big. " The Samsung Electronics Co. television set represents the next generation in home entertainment, "ultra-high-definition," or "4K," TV sets that boast four times the resolution of HDTV displays found in American households.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 2012
The 2012 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas officially opens for business Tuesday but thousands of reporters were given sneak peeks at what will be the world's largest exhibition of personal electronic gear and accessories. Here are some highlights from the show. TV maker Vizio rolls out a line of PCs Vizio is hoping to find the same success it has had in the TV business in the competitive market of personal computing. Irvine-based Vizio is showing off its new lineup of PCs, which consists of two all-in-one desktops and three laptop computers, all running Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Vizio CinemaWide is a big-screen TV set with a simple mission: to remove the annoying black bars that come with watching, as its name suggests, widescreen cinema movies. The CinemaWide is a 58-inch HD 3-D TV that stands out because its ultra-wide screen was specifically designed for watching movies, theater style. It removes black bars by displaying content at a stretched 21:9 ratio, unlike most HD TV sets, which have a 16:9 ratio. The CinemaWide also has higher resolution, -- 2,560 by 1,080 -- than the typical HD TV. The screen isn't the only big thing about this TV. The set weighs 66 pounds and is more than 4 1/2 feet wide.
SPORTS
October 19, 2010 | Staff and wire reports
Serena Williams is done for the season, just like her sister. In a statement e-mailed to the Associated Press by her agent, the younger Williams said she "re-tore the tendon" in her right foot, which she originally injured by cutting it on glass at a restaurant shortly after winning Wimbledon in July. Williams had surgery in New York on Monday; she first had the foot repaired July 15. Her announcement comes less than two weeks after Venus Williams said she wouldn't play for the rest of the year because of an injury to her left knee.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | Alex Pham
Sony Corp. unveiled a top-level organizational shake-up that signals key shifts in the Japanese company's priorities in consumer electronics as incoming Chief Executive Kazuo Hirai works to turn around massive losses. Hirai, promoted a month ago to replace Howard Stringer as the company's top officer effective Sunday, has restructured the electronics business around three "pillars": mobile, games and digital imaging. As of Sunday, the new mobile group will include both Vaio laptops and the Sony Ericsson cellphone business, while the games segment will include all PlayStation products.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Most TV manufacturers may have given up on plasma technology, but the public has not. Shipments of plasma sets jumped nearly 30% worldwide last year, to 19.1 million from 14.8 million the year before, according to research firm DisplaySearch. The reason: price. Plasma sets are "the most affordable large flat-panel TVs for many consumers," said DisplaySearch in releasing its survey Thursday. Forty-two-inch HDTV plasma sets commonly can be found for less than $500 in retail outlets, and 50-inch models often sell for about $600.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
We've all been there -- lazily relaxing on the couch, when an engrossing TV or movie show wraps up and is inexplicably followed by something that you just don't want to watch. The channel needs to be changed but the remote is out of arm's reach. Wouldn't it be nice just to tell the TV to change the channel itself? Soon, you may be able to do just that. Your TV will be able to follow your command, but for now you'll still need the remote in hand. Eventually, however, the remote won't be mandatory and someday, your TV may even talk back.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
LAS VEGAS - Local resident Tony Holdip stood admiring the latest technological lust object on display at the world's largest consumer electronics show as a friend joined a crowd of amateur photographers snapping pictures of the immense 110-inch Samsung TV. "This is unbelievable," Holdip said, and commented on the set's brightness and image clarity. "The only problem I can see with this is it's possibly too big. " The Samsung Electronics Co. television set represents the next generation in home entertainment, "ultra-high-definition," or "4K," TV sets that boast four times the resolution of HDTV displays found in American households.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Vizio has begun selling its Cinemawide TV, which has an ultra-wide, 58-inch screen that gets rid of black bars when viewers watch movies. The TV, which went on sale online Wednesday, is built with movies in mind and removes the black bars above and below with its 21:9 aspect ratio to give a more theater-like feel when watching most movies. The super-wide screen has a resolution of 2,560 by 1,080 pixels and is LED. A Vizio Web page compares an image on the Cinemawide with that of a traditional widescreen.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Vizio has begun selling its Cinemawide TV, which has an ultra-wide, 58-inch screen that gets rid of black bars when viewers watch movies. The TV, which went on sale online Wednesday, is built with movies in mind and removes the black bars above and below with its 21:9 aspect ratio to give a more theater-like feel when watching most movies. The super-wide screen has a resolution of 2,560 by 1,080 pixels and is LED. A Vizio Web page compares an image on the Cinemawide with that of a traditional widescreen.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | Alex Pham
Sony Corp. unveiled a top-level organizational shake-up that signals key shifts in the Japanese company's priorities in consumer electronics as incoming Chief Executive Kazuo Hirai works to turn around massive losses. Hirai, promoted a month ago to replace Howard Stringer as the company's top officer effective Sunday, has restructured the electronics business around three "pillars": mobile, games and digital imaging. As of Sunday, the new mobile group will include both Vaio laptops and the Sony Ericsson cellphone business, while the games segment will include all PlayStation products.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
We've all been there -- lazily relaxing on the couch, when an engrossing TV or movie show wraps up and is inexplicably followed by something that you just don't want to watch. The channel needs to be changed but the remote is out of arm's reach. Wouldn't it be nice just to tell the TV to change the channel itself? Soon, you may be able to do just that. Your TV will be able to follow your command, but for now you'll still need the remote in hand. Eventually, however, the remote won't be mandatory and someday, your TV may even talk back.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2012
The 2012 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas officially opens for business Tuesday but thousands of reporters were given sneak peeks at what will be the world's largest exhibition of personal electronic gear and accessories. Here are some highlights from the show. TV maker Vizio rolls out a line of PCs Vizio is hoping to find the same success it has had in the TV business in the competitive market of personal computing. Irvine-based Vizio is showing off its new lineup of PCs, which consists of two all-in-one desktops and three laptop computers, all running Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Most TV manufacturers may have given up on plasma technology, but the public has not. Shipments of plasma sets jumped nearly 30% worldwide last year, to 19.1 million from 14.8 million the year before, according to research firm DisplaySearch. The reason: price. Plasma sets are "the most affordable large flat-panel TVs for many consumers," said DisplaySearch in releasing its survey Thursday. Forty-two-inch HDTV plasma sets commonly can be found for less than $500 in retail outlets, and 50-inch models often sell for about $600.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
In just under eight years, Vizio Inc. has gone from a no-name brand to the nation's top seller of LCD televisions. Now the Irvine company has set its sights on becoming the largest consumer electronics company as it quietly rolls out such home entertainment gadgets as speakers, Blu-ray players, headphones and even Internet routers. FOR THE RECORD: Vizio: An article in the Dec. 25 Business section about TV maker Vizio Inc.'s branching into other types of consumer electronics said that most of the company's 300 employees work in sales.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Vizio CinemaWide is a big-screen TV set with a simple mission: to remove the annoying black bars that come with watching, as its name suggests, widescreen cinema movies. The CinemaWide is a 58-inch HD 3-D TV that stands out because its ultra-wide screen was specifically designed for watching movies, theater style. It removes black bars by displaying content at a stretched 21:9 ratio, unlike most HD TV sets, which have a 16:9 ratio. The CinemaWide also has higher resolution, -- 2,560 by 1,080 -- than the typical HD TV. The screen isn't the only big thing about this TV. The set weighs 66 pounds and is more than 4 1/2 feet wide.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2009 | Alex Pham
Oops, Vizio Inc. did it again. The scrappy Irvine television company caused heads to turn when it became the No. 1 supplier of flat-panel sets during the second quarter of 2007, much to the dismay of more established players such as Sony Corp. and Samsung Electronics Co. At the time, Vizio, led by industry veteran William Wang, was able to exploit a lull in shipments by the two electronics giants as they prepared inventory for the more important second half of the year.
SPORTS
October 19, 2010 | Staff and wire reports
Serena Williams is done for the season, just like her sister. In a statement e-mailed to the Associated Press by her agent, the younger Williams said she "re-tore the tendon" in her right foot, which she originally injured by cutting it on glass at a restaurant shortly after winning Wimbledon in July. Williams had surgery in New York on Monday; she first had the foot repaired July 15. Her announcement comes less than two weeks after Venus Williams said she wouldn't play for the rest of the year because of an injury to her left knee.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2009 | David Colker
The job : Wang, 45, is the founder and chief executive of Vizio Inc., which has its headquarters in Irvine. The consumer electronics manufacturer is known for bargain pricing and puts more LCD HDTVs on the market in the U.S. than any other company, according to iSuppli research. Background: He was born in Taiwan, and his parents moved to the U.S. when he was 12 to give him a better education. Wang fell in love with U.S. television. "I learned English from television," he said.
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