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Vlad Dracula

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Starz continues to expand its genre cred with two new series the cable network announced for development. The first is a science fiction action thriller from "Spartacus" creator Steven S. DeKnight and the other is a gothic horror thriller from "Babylon 5" creator J. Michael Stracynski. "Incursion," the series from DeKnight, is set in the middle of an intergalactic battle between humans and an alien race. Each season follows a squad of soldiers on a different planet as they continue the war. According to Starz, the series is expected to feature "grittily realistic combat" and "darkly complex characters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012
Eager to keep its edgy late-night block intact, Comedy Central has negotiated two-year contract extensions with its star comedians, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. Stewart's new deal will keep him on the network and at the helm of the "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" at least through the middle of 2015. His previous agreement would have expired next summer. Colbert's new arrangement goes through the end of 2014. Colbert serves as executive producer, writer and host for "The Colbert Report.
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NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Jonathan Rhys Meyers may have recently completed roles in "The Tudors" and "Albert Nobbs," but he's not ready to return to the 21st century yet. His latest role will return him to the 19th century to play the coolest vampire of them all, Dracula. On Tuesday, NBC announced the 10-episode series "Dracula," starring Rhys Meyers as the count, who travels to London in the 1890s. He poses as an American entrepreneur seeking to introduce modern technology to Victorian society, but in reality he's seeking revenge on the people who ruined his life centuries before.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
Before the current film "Bram Stoker's Dracula," there was Stoker's fin de siecle novel "Dracula." Both fiction. But there was a real Dracula, and he was not the slippery monster of Stoker's imagination, even though his inspiration came from the original. He was called Vlad Dracula (pronounced Dra-coo-lya ), or more familiarly by his 15th-Century contemporaries, Vlad Tepes (Vlad the Impaler).
TRAVEL
February 12, 1989 | CLAUDIA R. CAPOS, Capos is a free-lance writer who lives in Ann Arbor, Mich
Dracula has been rediscovered in Transylvania. Visitors who travel to this ancient province in central Romania in search of Dracula's roots are never really sure, however, whether the elusive figure they are pursuing is fact or fiction. There were actually two Draculas--one a man, the other a myth. The Romanians, in an effort to accommodate the demands of foreign tourists, have given them a little bit of both.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Jonathan Rhys Meyers may have recently completed roles in "The Tudors" and "Albert Nobbs," but he's not ready to return to the 21st century yet. His latest role will return him to the 19th century to play the coolest vampire of them all, Dracula. On Tuesday, NBC announced the 10-episode series "Dracula," starring Rhys Meyers as the count, who travels to London in the 1890s. He poses as an American entrepreneur seeking to introduce modern technology to Victorian society, but in reality he's seeking revenge on the people who ruined his life centuries before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
A scream echoes through the old house on the hill in Transylvania. A man in a black cape flies down the stairs. Outside a storm threatens. But even in Dracula's hometown, evil is not what it used to be. The man in black is Hans Bruno Frolich, a Lutheran priest. The shriek comes from his young daughter, playing upstairs in the parish house. And a few cobblestone streets away at the Club Dracula Internet Cafe, the only thing diabolical is the price of a drink.
NEWS
November 28, 1987 | JOE CAPOZZI, United Press International
Dracula's castle is up for sale. The creepy ruin in northeast Scotland that inspired author Bram Stoker's horror classic about the cape-waving vampire has been put on the selling block by a Scottish real estate firm for $262,500. But anyone with plans for a tourist attraction--beware. The castle is being offered by a Scottish building firm that abandoned plans for a resort because of the area's high property taxes and the objections of local villagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012
Eager to keep its edgy late-night block intact, Comedy Central has negotiated two-year contract extensions with its star comedians, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. Stewart's new deal will keep him on the network and at the helm of the "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" at least through the middle of 2015. His previous agreement would have expired next summer. Colbert's new arrangement goes through the end of 2014. Colbert serves as executive producer, writer and host for "The Colbert Report.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Starz continues to expand its genre cred with two new series the cable network announced for development. The first is a science fiction action thriller from "Spartacus" creator Steven S. DeKnight and the other is a gothic horror thriller from "Babylon 5" creator J. Michael Stracynski. "Incursion," the series from DeKnight, is set in the middle of an intergalactic battle between humans and an alien race. Each season follows a squad of soldiers on a different planet as they continue the war. According to Starz, the series is expected to feature "grittily realistic combat" and "darkly complex characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
A scream echoes through the old house on the hill in Transylvania. A man in a black cape flies down the stairs. Outside a storm threatens. But even in Dracula's hometown, evil is not what it used to be. The man in black is Hans Bruno Frolich, a Lutheran priest. The shriek comes from his young daughter, playing upstairs in the parish house. And a few cobblestone streets away at the Club Dracula Internet Cafe, the only thing diabolical is the price of a drink.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
Before the current film "Bram Stoker's Dracula," there was Stoker's fin de siecle novel "Dracula." Both fiction. But there was a real Dracula, and he was not the slippery monster of Stoker's imagination, even though his inspiration came from the original. He was called Vlad Dracula (pronounced Dra-coo-lya ), or more familiarly by his 15th-Century contemporaries, Vlad Tepes (Vlad the Impaler).
TRAVEL
February 12, 1989 | CLAUDIA R. CAPOS, Capos is a free-lance writer who lives in Ann Arbor, Mich
Dracula has been rediscovered in Transylvania. Visitors who travel to this ancient province in central Romania in search of Dracula's roots are never really sure, however, whether the elusive figure they are pursuing is fact or fiction. There were actually two Draculas--one a man, the other a myth. The Romanians, in an effort to accommodate the demands of foreign tourists, have given them a little bit of both.
NEWS
November 28, 1987 | JOE CAPOZZI, United Press International
Dracula's castle is up for sale. The creepy ruin in northeast Scotland that inspired author Bram Stoker's horror classic about the cape-waving vampire has been put on the selling block by a Scottish real estate firm for $262,500. But anyone with plans for a tourist attraction--beware. The castle is being offered by a Scottish building firm that abandoned plans for a resort because of the area's high property taxes and the objections of local villagers.
MAGAZINE
October 16, 1994 | Mark Ehrman
Bram Stoker's famous vampire, Dracula, was based on a real person, the metaphorically bloodthirsty Transylvanian ruler named Vlad Dracula, or Vlad Tepes ("the Impaler"). Dracula hailed from Sighisoara, a picturesque medieval hamlet about 140 miles northwest of Bucharest in what is now Romania, and the quaint two-story house in which he lived has been turned into an eatery called Restaurantul Berarie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2000 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prologue to USA's "Dark Prince: The True Story of Dracula" reminds us that"The world knows the legend . . . but few know the truth." No argument here. Unfortunately, tonight's earnest treatment of the tale is, for the most part, too ponderous for us to truly care, in spite of decent performances and an authentic look enhanced by Transylvanian locations.
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