Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVladimir A Kryuchkov
IN THE NEWS

Vladimir A Kryuchkov

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 23, 1991
Five of the eight leaders of the failed Kremlin coup have been arrested and another committed suicide, officials said. ARRESTED Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov KGB chief Vladimir A. Kryuchkov Alexander I. Tizyakov, president of the Assn. of State Enterprises Soviet Defense Council Deputy Oleg D. Baklanov, after parliamentary immunity lifted SOUGHT FOR ARREST Head of Soviet Peasants Union Vasily A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plotters in the KGB began drawing up plans for August's failed coup a full nine months beforehand, and former chairman Vladimir A. Kryuchkov played "a leading role," a top official of the security agency disclosed Friday at the conclusion of an internal investigation. Deputy KGB Chairman Anatoly Aleinikov told reporters that Kryuchkov, who is now awaiting trial on treason charges, "prepared this event, this transition to methods of force, beforehand, from the end of last year."
Advertisement
NEWS
August 21, 1991
Two days after hard-liners ousted Mikhail S. Gorbachev, his whereabouts remains shrouded in mystery. Even President Bush has not been able to reach him by telephone despite repeated attempts. But reports of possible sightings of Gorbachev circulated furiously in Moscow. Three members of the eight-man committee of coup leaders reportedly had resigned or were "ill"--Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov, Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov and KGB chief Vladimir A. Kryuchkov.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Leningrad military commander refused to send his troops into the city, the air force balked at the odious orders from above and one appalled officer in the Pacific fleet even talked his skeleton crew into slipping their crippled submarine out to sea rather than serving the upstart junta. As reports filter out on the extent of military opposition to last week's attempted coup, reformers say they are ever more convinced that the Soviet armed forces will never be the same.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
The chief of the KGB acknowledged Saturday that the secret police played a role in the cruelty and repression of the Stalin regime and vowed that such brutality would never happen again. "We bow our heads in memory of the innocent victims," Vladimir A. Kryuchkov said on national television. "This is a moral purification for us all and a guarantee that it will never happen again. Never."
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The KGB chief said Monday that eight Soviet intelligence agents have defected to the West since 1979 and that a spy from an unidentified foreign power was arrested in the past three weeks. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, answering questions from delegates to the 28th Congress of the Communist Party, denied accusations by a former KGB general that the agency is ineffective in its counterintelligence and intelligence operations and had spied on Soviet citizens.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may be just the latest symptom of crisis in Soviet society, but it was the chairman of the KGB who drew the biggest laugh of the day from Communist Party leaders on Tuesday as he gave a dire survey of the forces menacing the country from within and without. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, chairman of the Soviet state security agency, noted that with crime, ethnic strife and political extremism on the rise, people are asking, "Where's the KGB looking?"
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh said Thursday that he and Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, head of the KGB, will try to establish effective contact in several fields of law enforcement, including narcotics and terrorism. Thornburgh, winding up a five-day visit to the Soviet Union, told reporters that his discussions with Kryuchkov were "more philosophical than operational" but that the two officials will try to cooperate in "areas where our jurisdictions coincide."
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The long-feared KGB, struggling to adapt to greater openness in Soviet society, has rewritten its rules for the first time in 30 years so secret agents will spend less time spying on ordinary citizens, the agency's chief said in a remarkably candid interview published Tuesday. Vladimir A. Kryuchkov also reiterated that the KGB and its American counterpart in many respects, the CIA, should begin exchanging intelligence information to combat terrorism and drug trafficking.
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plotters in the KGB began drawing up plans for August's failed coup a full nine months beforehand, and former chairman Vladimir A. Kryuchkov played "a leading role," a top official of the security agency disclosed Friday at the conclusion of an internal investigation. Deputy KGB Chairman Anatoly Aleinikov told reporters that Kryuchkov, who is now awaiting trial on treason charges, "prepared this event, this transition to methods of force, beforehand, from the end of last year."
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, accused of complicity in the conservative coup d'etat this week, came under strong attack across the nation Friday, and its 73-year hold on power appeared to be slipping fast. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered the suspension of all the party's activities in the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, and halted the publication of its newspapers, including the party daily Pravda, on grounds that they had backed the putsch.
NEWS
August 23, 1991
Five of the eight leaders of the failed Kremlin coup have been arrested and another committed suicide, officials said. ARRESTED Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov KGB chief Vladimir A. Kryuchkov Alexander I. Tizyakov, president of the Assn. of State Enterprises Soviet Defense Council Deputy Oleg D. Baklanov, after parliamentary immunity lifted SOUGHT FOR ARREST Head of Soviet Peasants Union Vasily A.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, in naming his first replacements for the engineers of the failed coup, has chosen senior government officers who appear to be representatives of the Communist Old Guard rather than apostles of reform, according to U.S. analysts. U.S. officials voiced disappointment at the choices, interpreting them as either place-holders in a period of transition or a sign of Gorbachev's continued unwillingness to fully embrace the reform agenda.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | JACK NELSON and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A week before the Soviet coup, U.S. intelligence officials warned the White House of "a real possibility" that hard-liners in the KGB or the Soviet military might act to block the scheduled signing of the new Union Treaty, senior government officials said Wednesday. But they conceded that they knew too little about potential coup plans to enable President Bush to act.
NEWS
August 21, 1991
Two days after hard-liners ousted Mikhail S. Gorbachev, his whereabouts remains shrouded in mystery. Even President Bush has not been able to reach him by telephone despite repeated attempts. But reports of possible sightings of Gorbachev circulated furiously in Moscow. Three members of the eight-man committee of coup leaders reportedly had resigned or were "ill"--Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov, Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov and KGB chief Vladimir A. Kryuchkov.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the KGB, the Soviet security and intelligence service, sought on Tuesday to soften the impact of his recent tough speeches with a renewed commitment to political reforms at home and improved relations with the West. Vladimir A.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Soviet KGB security police, adding his weight to the mounting right-wing pressure on President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, demanded Saturday that the country return to its old, centralized economic system, effectively reversing the reforms of the last five years. Vladimir A.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight men, some previously little known to all but the most assiduous of Kremlinologists, or specialists on Soviet politics, have now placed themselves at the helm of the world's other superpower, claiming to exercise all power. Although the precise involvement of the increasingly conservative Soviet Communist Party with the Emergency Committee created by the eight is still shadowy, many of the committee's members occupy positions in the top party hierarchy.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, whose bold reform policies brought democracy to the Soviet Union and ended the Cold War, was replaced early today as president of his country, ostensibly for health reasons. Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev, named the chairman of the "State Committee on the Emergency Situation in the U.S.S.R.," took over as president.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|