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Vladimir Ashkenazy

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May 5, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
At one time, 10 and more years ago, it seemed that Vladimir Ashkenazy visited here annually, playing solo recitals or with orchestra--or both. Now, those visits appear to happen less frequently, and some of the time they bring the Russian-born musician here as conductor. No wonder, then, that what seemed to be an overflow crowd filled the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center for Ashkenazy's latest recital Wednesday night. What that throng heard was proof once more that the compact 51-year-old pianist remains one of the handful of standard-setters of his generation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Rick Schultz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Any asino can conduct," the autocratic Italian maestro Arturo Toscanini once said, comparing routine conductors to dunces. "But to make music, eh? Is difficile !" Now, try conducting a major orchestra without a rehearsal, as 23-year-old Lionel Bringuier, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's associate conductor, did in May. Or consider Leonard Slatkin's predicament last season when a reputed lack of familiarity with Verdi's "La Traviata" resulted in an ill-fated performance at the Metropolitan Opera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a Times music writer.
You can go home again. Just don't expect to do so quietly if you are one of the world's more prominent musicians, returning to the Soviet Union after more than a quarter-century in self-imposed exile. When Vladimir Ashkenazy arrived in Moscow last year for two concerts, he came with his own orchestra and a small media army.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2007 | Chris Pasles
Vladimir Ashkenazy will stop playing the piano in public for unspecified "physical problems," the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera reported. The renowned Russian pianist told the paper that he didn't want to discuss details, but he showed his hands to a journalist who noted that three fingers were misshapen by arthritis. Winner of the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels in 1956 and the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1962, Ashkenazy last played in public about a year ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1998 | Daniel Cariaga
The second Tchaikovsky International Competition--Van Cliburn won the first, in 1958--ended in a draw between Ashkenazy of the Soviet Union and Ogdon of England. In recordings made shortly after the competition, both 25-year-old winners show themselves deserving of the triumph they shared.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy left the Soviet Union 26 years ago, it was in great bitterness. He was rejecting, as strongly as he could, the Soviet system in which he had grown up as soul-destroying and turning his back on the Russian motherland. And for that he was called a traitor by many here.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1985
Pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy will be replaced at his originally scheduled February solo recital in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion by Horacio Gutierrez. The recital has been rescheduled for April 23. According to a representative from the sponsoring Los Angeles Philharmonic, Ashkenazy "has had to rethink his recital commitments," due to a heavy conducting schedule. (Ashkenazy will conduct the Philharmonic at the Music Center for two weeks beginning Feb. 20.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Soviet-born pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy, back in Moscow after an absence of 26 years, said today he wanted to endorse the reform process begun by Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev. "Had I been invited earlier, I would have not thought twice or three times, but 10 times before agreeing to come," Ashkenazy, who was born in the city of Gorky to Jewish parents, told a news conference at Moscow's Culture Fund headquarters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2007 | Chris Pasles
Vladimir Ashkenazy will stop playing the piano in public for unspecified "physical problems," the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera reported. The renowned Russian pianist told the paper that he didn't want to discuss details, but he showed his hands to a journalist who noted that three fingers were misshapen by arthritis. Winner of the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels in 1956 and the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 1962, Ashkenazy last played in public about a year ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Concerts by the Berlin Radio Symphony conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy and the Orchester der Beethovenhalle Bonn led by Dennis Russell Davies will be among 25 events presented by the Orange County Philharmonic Society in 1989-90 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Both orchestras will be making Orange County debuts, as will the Frankfurt Radio Symphony conducted by Eliahu Inbal and the Hanover Band of London led by concertmaster Roy Goodman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The NHK Symphony bills itself as Japan's first professional orchestra, tracing its origins to 1926 and chronicling among its recent music directors Charles Dutoit and Wolfgang Sawallisch. Vladimir Ashkenazy took over in 2004, and it was he who brought this disciplined band to the Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday afternoon as the first stop on a U.S. tour that includes concerts in San Francisco, Philadelphia and Boston before concluding in New York on Oct. 23.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1998 | Daniel Cariaga
The second Tchaikovsky International Competition--Van Cliburn won the first, in 1958--ended in a draw between Ashkenazy of the Soviet Union and Ogdon of England. In recordings made shortly after the competition, both 25-year-old winners show themselves deserving of the triumph they shared.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1994 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Vladimir Ashkenazy may not have deeply moved every last one of his listeners Saturday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, but that certainly wasn't his fault. Which is to say that everything seemed to go according to plans for the 56-year-old Russian/Icelandic pianist. And thoroughly considered, profound plans they were, delivered with patrician subtlety and authoritative technique. His Beethoven/Prokofiev recital unfolded with impressive logic, in a large curve of thought.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
For his only local conducting appearances this season, Vladimir Ashkenazy chose a satisfying program to lead the Los Angeles Philharmonic through. It combined William Kraft's bright, very short Fanfare, Brahms' "Tragic" Overture, Mozart's G-major Violin Concerto and Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony. And satisfying it was in all ways, Friday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
On the same weekend last year that East Berliners were beginning literally to start chipping at the Wall, Vladimir Ashkenazy returned to his native Soviet Union for the first time in a quarter-century, along with London's Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, of which he is music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a Times music writer.
You can go home again. Just don't expect to do so quietly if you are one of the world's more prominent musicians, returning to the Soviet Union after more than a quarter-century in self-imposed exile. When Vladimir Ashkenazy arrived in Moscow last year for two concerts, he came with his own orchestra and a small media army.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Returning to Ambassador Auditorium on Thursday night, the Berlin Radio Symphony, which visited here five years ago, brought its latest chief conductor, Vladimir Ashkenazy, to lead a Brahms/Berg/Scriabin program. For those podium-watchers who had written Ashkenazy off as an intense but flawed wannabe conductor, this performance offered a chance for reconsideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
For his only local conducting appearances this season, Vladimir Ashkenazy chose a satisfying program to lead the Los Angeles Philharmonic through. It combined William Kraft's bright, very short Fanfare, Brahms' "Tragic" Overture, Mozart's G-major Violin Concerto and Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony. And satisfying it was in all ways, Friday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1990 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Returning to Ambassador Auditorium on Thursday night, the Berlin Radio Symphony, which visited here five years ago, brought its latest chief conductor, Vladimir Ashkenazy, to lead a Brahms/Berg/Scriabin program. For those podium-watchers who had written Ashkenazy off as an intense but flawed wannabe conductor, this performance offered a chance for reconsideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
We seem to be in the midst of a boom in pre-atonal Schoenberg, something apparent in the Los Angeles Philharmonic programming this season. Andre Previn returns in February for the monumental "Gurrelieder," while this weekend at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Vladimir Ashkenazy matched "Pelleas und Melisande" with some Sibelius. Completed in 1903, Schoenberg's "Pelleas und Melisande" is a long tone poem, almost obsessive in its programmatic depiction of Maeterlinck's play.
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