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Vladimir Draitser

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BUSINESS
April 21, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the American Trade Center in Moscow opens for business in September, top U.S. and Soviet officials will be on hand to cut the ribbon to the first Western-managed hotel and business complex in the Soviet Union. The complex is the first Soviet project of Americom International Corp., an Irvine development company. And Americom seems to have scored a hit. The deal may look simple on paper, but it took years of behind-the-scenes political and economic maneuvering to pull it off.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the American Trade Center in Moscow opens for business in September, top U.S. and Soviet officials will be on hand to cut the ribbon to the first Western-managed hotel and business complex in the Soviet Union. The complex is the first Soviet project of Americom International Corp., an Irvine development company. And Americom seems to have scored a hit. The deal may look simple on paper, but it took years of behind-the-scenes political and economic maneuvering to pull it off.
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NEWS
February 23, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ludmilla V. Gubareva once belonged to the ranks of Russia's invisible women: the army of long-suffering middle-aged babushkas who scrub, sweep, mop and even shovel snow but get neither good wages nor respect. Now the pleasant, plump, 54-year-old charwoman and her 59-year-old sister are suing the American-managed Radisson Slavayanskaya Hotel for wrongful dismissal. They have astounded their downtrodden countrywomen by demanding $10 million each in damages.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1995 | BETH KNOBEL and JOHN O'DELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
All seemed well in the glow of perestroika as Irvine-based Americom Business Centers and Radisson Hotels International teamed up in 1989 to operate a posh hotel and business office complex in Moscow. Now the relationship resembles a battle scene from "War and Peace." And Americom's fiery president, Paul E. Tatum, is battling not only the Minneapolis hotel operator, but the Russian partner in the joint venture as well.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The red brick walls and fir-shaded alleys of Novodevichy Cemetery embrace Russia's pantheon of writers, poets, cosmonauts and Communist leaders. Those who knew Paul Tatum, a brash young businessman from Middle America, believe that he too deserves a place among the departed elite. Like Communist revolutionary John Reed, another American who died trying to build a better Russia, Tatum had traded the security of his homeland to march in this country's tumultuous vanguard.
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