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Vladimir Feltsman

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
At one time--say, 50 years ago--a pianist of high promise might build a solid international career on good musical manners, good taste and a virtuoso technique. No more. Such qualities, though never in abundant supply, have become simply the basic requirements for consideration in the worldwide keyboard sweepstakes. To them, one must bring additional virtues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Russian-born pianist Vladimir Feltsman has withdrawn from a scheduled performance in Orange County on Sunday, citing health reasons. The recital had been scheduled to take place at the Soka Performing Arts Center in Aliso Viejo on Sunday at 3 p.m. A spokesman for the Soka Performing Arts Center said that the center will work with the pianist's management to reschedule his recital later in the season, provided his health improves. Tickets will be honored for the rescheduled performance date or can be exchanged for seats at future performances.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Vladimir Feltsman, the 35-year-old pianist who became "a Soviet unperson" and was barred from playing in major concert halls because he applied for an exit visa arrived in the United States on Tuesday. Feltsman, who arrived with wife, Anna, and 4-year-old son Daniel, will teach in New York at the State University of New York, New Paltz campus. The pianist is scheduled to play at the White House on Sept. 27. Plans for a late autumn concert at Carnegie Hall are also in the works.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
The electronic marquis in front of the Probst Center for the Performing Arts in Thousand Oaks announced all that the community needed to know: the Conejo Symphony, Saturday, 8 p.m. Perhaps it was understandable that Vladimir Feltsman, who, by the way, appeared at the same time and place, didn't get his name up in lights. There's a controversy brewing over this little 34-year-old community orchestra that soon, apparently, will be no more.
NEWS
February 11, 1986 | From Reuters
Vandals damaged a grand piano at Spaso House, the residence of the U.S. ambassador in Moscow, hours before a Jewish "refusenik" sat down to give a concert, a U.S. Embassy spokesman said today. One string was cut, three were bent and two others were untuned Sunday before Vladimir Feltsman was due to give a recital of Liszt music, he said. Feltsman, 34, said tires on his car were slashed the last two times he played at the residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1987
Those who cannot do, should not teach. Nevertheless, there is many an excellent pianist who would make a lousy teacher. I know nothing of the abilities of Vladimir Feltsman or letter-writer Lona G. Van Den Heuvel as pianists (Calendar Letters, Aug. 23). I do know, at 63, that I have rejoiced in my life as a "lowly neighborhood piano teacher." Let me inform Van Den Heuvel, from my experience, that a good teacher is as rare as the aspiring concert pianist who "makes it." Quite apart from her frustrations, let me beg her most urgently never to teach.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1987
Many native-born American concert pianists would give anything for the publicity that William J. Eaton gave pianist Vladimir Feltsman of Moscow ("After 8 Years, Emigration Is Music to His Ears," Aug. 6). Feltsman had not even arrived in the United States but he was already guaranteed a university teaching position, plenty of money and concert tours. American pianists should be so lucky! Eaton's article states that Feltsman will be earning more money in a year of teaching than he did in 20 years as a performer in the U.S.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
Although a crowd of 5,875 doesn't do much to fill Hollywood Bowl, it's still quite a gathering for a piano recital--even one by so celebrated a keyboard hero as Vladimir Feltsman, the much touted emigrant of the season just a few years ago. The socio-political celebrity surrounding Feltsman's arrival in the U.S. three years ago has abated considerably, leaving an excitable but seldom exciting artist of formidable technical attainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1991 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While about 60 minutes north by freeway fellow Russian pianist Evgeny Kissin made his much-awaited Los Angeles debut at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Vladimir Feltsman was making his first appearance in the not-so-glamorous confines of Don Wash Auditorium. What was Feltsman, the internationally acclaimed, much-recorded, much-filmed former Soviet pianist doing in Garden Grove? He may have asked that himself more than once before the evening was over.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
Although a crowd of 5,875 doesn't do much to fill Hollywood Bowl, it's still quite a gathering for a piano recital--even one by so celebrated a keyboard hero as Vladimir Feltsman, the much touted emigrant of the season just a few years ago. The socio-political celebrity surrounding Feltsman's arrival in the U.S. three years ago has abated considerably, leaving an excitable but seldom exciting artist of formidable technical attainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
At one time--say, 50 years ago--a pianist of high promise might build a solid international career on good musical manners, good taste and a virtuoso technique. No more. Such qualities, though never in abundant supply, have become simply the basic requirements for consideration in the worldwide keyboard sweepstakes. To them, one must bring additional virtues.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1988
Christopher Mankiewicz would have us believe that Martin Bernheimer and the New York Times music critics know more about musical performance practice and standards than the "name musicians" appearing before the public (Saturday Letters, May 21). Mankiewicz also seems to feel that concert audiences are so ignorant (at least L.A. audiences) that they cannot discriminate between a good performance and a bad one, at least not without the guidance of the all-knowing music critic! There is no doubt that Bernheimer and his colleagues are knowledgeable musicological scholars who frequently illuminate important musical events.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1988
In reply to Ray Goldstone (Saturday Letters, May 7), I would like to express some long-overdue appreciation to Martin Bernheimer for his never-ending battle to maintain critical standards in this city. I admire his courage in refusing to succumb to the pressures of the musical audience here, which so often applauds wildly for poor or routine performances by name musicians, either out of musical ignorance, or for fear of alienating the artist in question. The Vladimir Feltsman concert is a perfect example.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1988 | MARK SWED, Swed is a free-lance writer in New York City
You have to catch Vladimir Feltsman on the run. Last Thursday night, there was a benefit concert for the 92nd St. Y, where the Russian emigre pianist performed Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto for an audience that included some of New York's highest society and that paid up to $1,000 a seat. The next day, it was off to New Paltz, where Feltsman teaches at the State University of New York, for two days of extensive, six-hour master classes.
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