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Vladimir Gubaryev

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"If audiences see my play and want to march off and shut down all the nuclear power plants and weapons stations," said Vladimir Gubaryev, Pravda science editor and playwright of "Sarcophagus" (opening at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in its U.S. premiere Friday), "I will march off with them." Then he added, smiling, "But I doubt that will happen."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
"If audiences see my play and want to march off and shut down all the nuclear power plants and weapons stations," said Vladimir Gubaryev, Pravda science editor and playwright of "Sarcophagus" (opening at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in its U.S. premiere Friday), "I will march off with them." Then he added, smiling, "But I doubt that will happen."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
It's always interesting to get the British reaction to plays recently seen in Los Angeles. John Patrick Shanley's "Savage in Limbo," which got a beautiful production last summer at the Cast Theater, opened at London's Gate Theater last month to mixed-positive reviews. The critics showed some resistance to its typically American setup--five drifters spouting off in a bar--but most agreed that Shanley was trying to get at something real and all agreed that he knew how to throw the language around.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Vladimir Gubaryev, a science editor for Pravda, the Soviet Union's state-run newspaper, was reportedly so disturbed by the Chernobyl nuclear accident that he wrote "Sarcophagus" in a fury of emotion and ambition. His play seems to have two worthy, far-reaching objectives: to dramatize the human pain of the worst nuclear catastrophe ever and to examine the specifics of misfeasance and malfeasance that led up to it.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
The morning after Vladimir Gubaryev's "Sarcophagus" opened at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, the announcement was made that all major issues of a treaty between the governments of the United States and the U.S.S.R. to ban intermediate-range nuclear missiles had finally been settled.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | JAN HERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Nobody can accuse David Chambers of false enthusiasm. "Theater bores me," the 43-year-old director said. "I rarely go. It's more fun to make than watch." Such candor, delivered with a cool smile, would be less striking if he were not in the midst of previews for the American premiere of Louise Page's "Golden Girls," which opens tonight at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. The play has nothing to do with the TV sitcom of the same name. It is about a British women's track team.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I did not want to mimic Billie Holiday," said Andre Ernotte, whose staging of Lanie Robertson's "Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill" opens tonight at the Hollywood Playhouse. "When I was first approached about this, I told them that voyeuristic melodrama doesn't turn me on, that if I did it they'd have to deglamorize Billie: show the dark, sad side. So it's not so much a nightclub act as a theater play with music."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Few contemporary Soviet plays were done in the West during the '70s and early '80s, not because of the Cold War, but because the plays were so bland. The characters would be faced with a small, local problem and they would solve it by pulling together. The big problems in the Soviet Union had been solved years ago. Obviously, that is no longer the view.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Last spring, with the Challenger disaster still fresh in everybody's mind, Arthur Miller's "All My Sons" (1947) seemed a very pertinent play at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. The New York critics felt the same way about the play's Broadway revival this week. Indeed, Frank Rich of the New York Times found Miller's story almost too topical: a manufacturer sending out a batch of fatally defective airplane parts. "So what else is new?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Curtain time here is 7 p.m. Just before that, a flurry of people can be found outside every theater, hoping that somebody has an extra pair of tickets to sell. You would think it a sight to gladden an actor's heart, but Oleg Tabakov of the Moscow Art Theatre considers it a disgrace. "This deficit of theater tickets is artificial," Tabakov said the other afternoon at the Actors' Club on Gorky Street. "For a city with a population of 9 million, we need not less than 90 theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"Sarcophagus," the play about the Chernobyl disaster that opens tonight in London in a production of the Royal Shakespeare Company, will receive its American premiere at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in September as part of the Los Angeles Festival. Acquisition of American rights to this play is considered a bit of a coup for LATC. ("Sarcophagus" is now playing in Vienna and opens April 26 in Stockholm.
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