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Vladimir Horowitz

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1994 | HERBERT GLASS
The words of Wanda Toscanini Horowitz, "His philosophy was to transmit the music to the public and not to bore the public," launch "Vladimir Horowitz: A Reminiscence" and invite us to share with her an easygoing hour with the pianist, who died in 1989. He would have been 90 this year. Mrs. Horowitz offers no startling revelations regarding her 56 years as the lionized pianist's wife.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
"Vladimir Horowitz: Live at Carnegie Hall" Vladimir Horowitz's technical ease, power, wide color palette, singing tone and musicianship sent other now-legendary pianists, including Rudolf Serkin, Arthur Rubinstein and Claudio Arrau, back to the practice room. Serkin said Horowitz "opened a new world for me," and Rubinstein admitted in his autobiography to feeling jealous after hearing Horowitz's near note-perfect playing. Arrau's own mother turned to him after a Horowitz recital and said, "He plays better than you. " Most baby boomers never got to hear that Horowitz, when his technique was unsurpassed.
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NEWS
November 6, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vladimir Horowitz, whose brilliant technique and emotional profundity led many to consider him the 20th Century's greatest pianist, died Sunday at his townhouse on New York City's Upper East Side. Horowitz, 85, suffered a heart attack about 12:30 p.m., said his manager, Peter Gelb. "I believe he died of some sort of massive, major heart attack," Gelb said, noting that details would have to come from medical officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2007 | Rick Schultz, Special to The Times
Pianist Mordecai Shehori, who left a cult following in New York in 2005 to take up residence in Las Vegas, is not well known in Los Angeles. Sunday afternoon, he made an entertaining, if not entirely satisfying, West Coast debut at the Atelier in Mar Vista, performing works by Mozart, Beethoven, Liszt and Pabst.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There is a story, possibly not even apocryphal, about Groucho Marx attending a celebrity screening of a documentary about Artur Rubinstein, who was in attendance. Rubinstein asked Groucho how he liked the film. "I was a little disappointed," Groucho said. Rubinstein, who was very pleased with the film, asked why. "I always thought you played the fiddle," Groucho explained. Groucho knew well enough that Rubinstein was a pianist. Everybody did; that was the point.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Vladimir Horowitz, who died on Sunday one month after his 85th birthday, was--well--Vladimir Horowitz. There was no other pianist like him. Chances are, there never will be. He played by his own rules, even at his worst. At his best, he played magnificently. That puts it, as they say, mildly. Once established and universally adulated, he played only when he pleased (in later years at the odd hour of 4 on Sunday afternoons). He played only where he pleased. He played only what he pleased.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2003 | Peter Gelb, Special to The Times
In the fall of 1981, I returned to New York from my job as assistant manager of the Boston Symphony to join Columbia Artists Management, the renowned talent and booking agency for classical musicians. Soon after, the formidable wife of Vladimir Horowitz, arguably the greatest concert pianist of all time -- whose centennial was celebrated Wednesday -- invited me to become his manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Pianist Vladimir Horowitz is set to record with an orchestra for the first time in eight years, the Deutsche Grammophon company said Wednesday. The 84-year-old pianist will begin recording Mozart works next month in Milan accompanied by the La Scala Opera Orchestra, and DG expects to release the recording later this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1989 | from United Press International
Vladimir Horowitz will be buried at a private family funeral in Italy, a spokesman for a Manhattan funeral home said Monday. A spokesman for the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Home said the funeral will be in Milan, Italy, where Horowitz will be buried at the family mausoleum of his wife, Wanda, daughter of renowned conductor Arturo Toscanini. She survives him.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1986 | From Reuters
Pianist Vladimir Horowitz was awarded West Germany's highest civilian honor Monday after a sentimental journey to the city where his career began six decades ago. The Russian-born Jew, who left Germany the year before the Nazis took power in 1933 and vowed never to return, received the Federal Service Cross from Hamburg Mayor Klaus von Dohnyani.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2003 | Mark Swed
The recording of Horowitz's 1965 comeback concert has long been a staple of the brilliant and erratic pianist's discography, but always in edited form. Time's come for it now, in these documentary-obsessed, warts-'n'-all days, for it just as he played it, with clinkers galore. All those wrong notes were an essential part of Horowitz's performances. He was a calculating daredevil, always going for the big effect as he slammed down some of the most powerful fingers in keyboard history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2003 | Peter Gelb, Special to The Times
In the fall of 1981, I returned to New York from my job as assistant manager of the Boston Symphony to join Columbia Artists Management, the renowned talent and booking agency for classical musicians. Soon after, the formidable wife of Vladimir Horowitz, arguably the greatest concert pianist of all time -- whose centennial was celebrated Wednesday -- invited me to become his manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2003 | Mark Swed; Richard S. Ginell; Chris Pasles; Josef Woodard
"Vladimir Horowitz Rediscovered: Carnegie Hall Recital, Nov. 16, 1975" Vladimir Horowitz, piano (RCA Victor Red Seal) ** "The Incomparable Rudolf Serkin" Rudolf Serkin, piano (Deutsche Grammophon) ** Rudolf Serkin and Vladimir Horowitz were close contemporaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
Wanda Toscanini Horowitz, the daughter of conductor Arturo Toscanini who helped guide her husband, Vladimir Horowitz, through his turbulent career as a piano virtuoso, has died. She was 90. She died at her Manhattan home Friday. The cause of death was not immediately known. She was born in Milan, the youngest of four children. As a young woman, she served as assistant to her mother, who saw to the maestro's needs for his concert tours. When she met Horowitz at age 25, she was smitten.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1994 | HERBERT GLASS
The words of Wanda Toscanini Horowitz, "His philosophy was to transmit the music to the public and not to bore the public," launch "Vladimir Horowitz: A Reminiscence" and invite us to share with her an easygoing hour with the pianist, who died in 1989. He would have been 90 this year. Mrs. Horowitz offers no startling revelations regarding her 56 years as the lionized pianist's wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1987 | From Reuters and
Russian-born concert pianist Vladimir Horowitz has canceled an autumn tour of Europe, Milan's La Scala opera house said today. La Scala, where the 83-year-old Horowitz was to have played Oct. 18, said it had been told of the cancellation by his agent, Peter Gelb, in a telex from New York. Gelb gave no reason, a spokesman for La Scala said.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Russian-born Vladimir Horowitz, considered the century's greatest pianist, was buried today in Milan's Toscanini mausoleum next to his daughter and father-in-law, conductor Arturo Toscanini. Horowitz's recordings of Chopin and other works were played as his coffin arrived at Milan's La Scala opera house where dozens of musicians and music lovers paid their last respects. Horowitz's widow, Wanda, was among about 200 mourners at the Roman Catholic funeral ceremony.
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