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Vladimir Ivashko

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NEWS
June 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Ukrainian Communist Party chief Vladimir Ivashko was elected president of the Soviet Union's second largest republic Monday after more than 100 radical deputies walked out of Parliament in protest. The independent Rukh news agency reported that Ivashko won the Ukraine's top government office by polling 278 votes to 52 against in the 450-seat Parliament.
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NEWS
November 20, 1994
Vladimir Ivashko, 62, a former top aide to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and head of Ukraine's Communist Party. Ivashko was born in 1932 in Poltava, in southern Ukraine. After graduating from the Kharkiv Mining Institute, he worked as an industrial manager and then as a Communist Party official. He became the head of Ukraine's Communist Party in 1989, and was elected speaker of the Ukrainian Parliament the next year.
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NEWS
July 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, withdrawing further from direct, day-to-day management of the nation and its economy, elected a new Politburo on Saturday that excludes, for the first time, the head of the country's government as well as its key ministers. The move, which is likely to prove one of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's most important reforms, will end, symbolically and practically, the party's determined use of the state to enhance its own power as well as to implement its policies.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, withdrawing further from direct, day-to-day management of the nation and its economy, elected a new Politburo on Saturday that excludes, for the first time, the head of the country's government as well as its key ministers. The move, which is likely to prove one of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's most important reforms, will end, symbolically and practically, the party's determined use of the state to enhance its own power as well as to implement its policies.
NEWS
November 20, 1994
Vladimir Ivashko, 62, a former top aide to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and head of Ukraine's Communist Party. Ivashko was born in 1932 in Poltava, in southern Ukraine. After graduating from the Kharkiv Mining Institute, he worked as an industrial manager and then as a Communist Party official. He became the head of Ukraine's Communist Party in 1989, and was elected speaker of the Ukrainian Parliament the next year.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
Vladimir Ivashko was elected today as deputy leader of the Soviet Communist Party, the official news agency Tass said, quoting reliable sources. Ivashko, considered a moderate conservative, defeated hard-line champion Yegor Ligachev for the post of deputy to party chief Mikhail S. Gorbachev in a vote at the party's 28th congress, Tass said. it did not give a vote count. Gorbachev endorsed Ivashko shortly before the start of the balloting.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
Chinese Communist Party General Secretary Jiang Zemin's plan to go to Moscow in May for a summit with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev tops the agenda of a five-day visit, starting today, of Vladimir A. Ivashko, deputy general secretary of the Soviet Communist Party. Jiang's trip would be a return visit for Gorbachev's historic 1989 trip to Beijing, which formally ended three decades of enmity between the two nations. Also to be discussed: The Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Defiant Communist officials said today they oppose widespread private property and indicated the party will resist calls to give up its own vast holdings and share power in a coalition government. The officials, briefing reporters on a two-day Central Committee plenum that ended Tuesday, also rejected the elimination of party cells in the work place and said the Soviet Union will continue to celebrate Revolution Day as a national holiday. Vladimir A. Ivashko, the party's No.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | Times Wire Services
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev oversaw the firing of the last major Brezhnev-era holdover today as Ukrainian Communist leaders removed hard-line party boss Vladimir Shcherbitsky and ended his 17 years of iron rule in the southern republic. The Ukrainian Communist Party's Central Committee chose Vladimir Ivashko to replace Shcherbitsky as first secretary of the republic's party apparatus, Tass press agency said. Shcherbitsky, 71, was retired from the ruling Communist Party Politburo on Sept.
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's leadership on Friday unveiled its strategy to finish off the formerly all-powerful Communist Party once and for all at an impending trial deemed so critical that President Boris N. Yeltsin has warned that it could lead to civil war. The key, top officials said, will be to use the Communist Party's own words and rules against it, showing that Yeltsin was right to ban it last November because it acted as a supreme government rather than a mere political party.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Ukrainian Communist Party chief Vladimir Ivashko was elected president of the Soviet Union's second largest republic Monday after more than 100 radical deputies walked out of Parliament in protest. The independent Rukh news agency reported that Ivashko won the Ukraine's top government office by polling 278 votes to 52 against in the 450-seat Parliament.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev warned Saturday that his reform program will falter across the country if it stumbles in the Ukraine, the Soviet Union's second-largest republic, which recently has been racked by nationalist, labor and religious unrest. Vladimir A. Ivashko, the new Communist Party leader of the republic and a strong Gorbachev supporter who was elected three days ago after the ousting of conservative Vladimir V.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, angered by Communist Party conservatives' harsh attacks on his leadership, threatened Thursday to resign unless he received a vote of confidence from the party's Central Committee. Then, in a dramatic Kremlin showdown, Gorbachev got the endorsement he wanted as Central Committee members voted, 322 to 13 with 14 abstentions, to reject his resignation and not even debate his continued leadership of the party as its general secretary.
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