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Vladimir Lobov

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NEWS
December 8, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With discontent in the Soviet army swelling ominously, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev fired its conservative chief of staff on Saturday and replaced him with a general known for his resistance to August's right-wing coup attempt. The outgoing chief of staff, Army Gen. Vladimir Lobov, had energetically promoted military reform since he was appointed in August, overseeing plans to trim the 4-million-strong armed forces and deploy them more defensively.
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NEWS
December 8, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With discontent in the Soviet army swelling ominously, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev fired its conservative chief of staff on Saturday and replaced him with a general known for his resistance to August's right-wing coup attempt. The outgoing chief of staff, Army Gen. Vladimir Lobov, had energetically promoted military reform since he was appointed in August, overseeing plans to trim the 4-million-strong armed forces and deploy them more defensively.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The sweeping purge of hard-line officials launched by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin turns Moscow sharply toward reforms long espoused by the United States, President Bush and other U.S. officials said Friday. Bush, assessing Gorbachev's actions from his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Me.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, accused of complicity in the conservative coup d'etat this week, came under strong attack across the nation Friday, and its 73-year hold on power appeared to be slipping fast. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered the suspension of all the party's activities in the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, and halted the publication of its newspapers, including the party daily Pravda, on grounds that they had backed the putsch.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | From Reuters
Gen. Vladimir N. Lobov has been appointed chief of staff of the Warsaw Pact joint armed forces, replacing Gen. Anatoly I. Gribkov, the army newspaper Red Star reported Saturday. Lobov, born in 1935, was chosen by the member states. First deputy chief of staff since 1987, Lobov is regarded as a supporter of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's policies of cutting defense spending and the size of the army.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, which has the world's largest armed forces, is considering plans to cut them by as much as half in the next three years, a senior Soviet Defense Ministry official said Tuesday. Col. Gen. Pavel Grachev, the newly appointed first deputy defense minister, told a legislative hearing that the reduction could take the Soviet armed forces from the present 4.2 million to as few as 2 million or 2.5 million by the end of 1994, the news agency Interfax reported.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | Los Angeles Times
A selection of quotes offers the Soviet reaction and positions on the Persian Gulf crisis , which began Aug. 2 with Iraq's invasion of Kuwait: Aug. 2: "The Soviet Union believes that no contentious issues, no matter how complicated, justify the use of force.
NEWS
September 1, 1990 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, contradicting objections raised by other Soviet officials to the U.S. troop buildup in the Persian Gulf region, said Friday that the superpowers are cooperating well in the region and that he does not fear the United States is seeking a permanent military presence there. "We have to be very responsible, all of us, so as to prevent a large-scale military conflict," Gorbachev told a rare news conference. "I believe this is our common concern and we are promoting it."
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Muslim republic of Tadzhikistan declared independence Monday, wresting an 11th state from the shrinking Soviet Union and setting off another political conflict at the edge of the former Communist empire. Ethnic clashes in the Caucasus intensified, with 13 deaths and 30 injuries reported from weekend fighting between Armenians and Azerbaijanis who have waged war for almost four years over the contested Nagorno-Karabakh region.
NEWS
August 24, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Communist Party, accused of complicity in the conservative coup d'etat this week, came under strong attack across the nation Friday, and its 73-year hold on power appeared to be slipping fast. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered the suspension of all the party's activities in the Russian Federation, the country's largest republic, and halted the publication of its newspapers, including the party daily Pravda, on grounds that they had backed the putsch.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's surprise summit meeting with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev next week will be both a landmark and a critical test in the new, cooperative relationship of the world's two nuclear superpowers. The meeting in Helsinki, which Bush announced Saturday, marks the first summit in 45 years to be convened as a cooperative effort to help solve a global crisis.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union on Monday cautiously endorsed the U.S. military buildup in the Persian Gulf but warned Washington that its massive presence is becoming a new issue around which hard-line Arabs would coalesce and that is obscuring the original issue, Iraq's seizure of Kuwait. Expressing both understanding for U.S. motives but also fears for the region if Washington uses military force, Gennady I.
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