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Vladimir Lukin

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NEWS
February 1, 1992 | Reuters
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday named the chairman of the Russian Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee as the country's first ambassador to Washington. Addressing a news conference after the Security Council summit, Yeltsin startled reporters by quietly introducing Vladimir Lukin, on hand for the summit, as his U.S. envoy. "For me it is a great honor to be the first ambassador to the U.S.A. from a Russian democratic state," Lukin told reporters.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1992
The Russian ambassador to the United States, Vladimir Peter Lukin, spoke to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council last Friday. From his address: A Look at History "Democratization of our country is very difficult. . . . (However) it is incorrect to say that we have no democratic tradition. Actually, we have one and it is a long tradition of opposing authoritarianism (that predates) . . . the October Revolution (1917). . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1992
The Russian ambassador to the United States, Vladimir Peter Lukin, spoke to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council last Friday. From his address: A Look at History "Democratization of our country is very difficult. . . . (However) it is incorrect to say that we have no democratic tradition. Actually, we have one and it is a long tradition of opposing authoritarianism (that predates) . . . the October Revolution (1917). . . .
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS and DOYLE MCMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Had he the courage, says Vladimir P. Lukin, Russia's new ambassador to the United States, he would have been a full-fledged dissident in the 1960s and 1970s like Sakharov and Solzhenitsyn. Had he the talent, Lukin continues, he would have liked to compose poetry and write great works of philosophy like his friends among Russia's intelligentsia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "most famous woman in Russia" was there. So was Zsa Zsa Gabor. And Mr. Blackwell. And Cesar Romero. And Lindsay Wagner. And Vince Edwards. And the actor who played Ensign Chekov in "Star Trek." They came to the Armand Hammer Museum in Westwood to announce plans for "SpaceBridge 92," in which celebrities here will speak via satellite television to their counterparts at the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg on the night of the Academy Awards ceremony March 30.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS and DOYLE MCMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Had he the courage, says Vladimir P. Lukin, Russia's new ambassador to the United States, he would have been a full-fledged dissident in the 1960s and 1970s like Sakharov and Solzhenitsyn. Had he the talent, Lukin continues, he would have liked to compose poetry and write great works of philosophy like his friends among Russia's intelligentsia.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | Reuters
The United States on Friday signed its first economic agreement with Russia, authorizing loans and insurance to American companies that do business in the former Soviet republic. Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who signed the agreement with Russian Ambassador Vladimir Lukin, hailed it as "an important step in normalizing our economic relations, commercial relations with Russia."
WORLD
June 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Russian authorities often violate citizens' right to protest in public, the country's human rights ombudsman said in a report published Thursday. Opposition groups' attempts to march and demonstrate have been restricted by authorities in several cities. Police have brutally broken up some of the protests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
UC Irvine's Global Peace and Conflict Studies program received a $55,250 grant this month that will pay for various guest lectures and research projects. The grant was awarded by the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation. About $21,000 of the grant will be used to pay for lectures and other activities that the program presents throughout the school year.
WORLD
December 24, 2011 | By Sergei Loiko, Times staff writer
More than 100,000 people took to the streets Saturday in the biggest show of protest in Russia's capital since the breakup of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s. "Russia without Putin!" the crowd chanted as it protested alleged election fraud during the recent parliamentary vote that saw Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's United Russia party garner nearly 50% of the vote. Many in the crowd said they were fed up with Putin, who served as president for eight years beginning in 2000 and is now seeking a return to the presidency in an election scheduled for March.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "most famous woman in Russia" was there. So was Zsa Zsa Gabor. And Mr. Blackwell. And Cesar Romero. And Lindsay Wagner. And Vince Edwards. And the actor who played Ensign Chekov in "Star Trek." They came to the Armand Hammer Museum in Westwood to announce plans for "SpaceBridge 92," in which celebrities here will speak via satellite television to their counterparts at the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg on the night of the Academy Awards ceremony March 30.
NEWS
February 1, 1992 | Reuters
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday named the chairman of the Russian Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee as the country's first ambassador to Washington. Addressing a news conference after the Security Council summit, Yeltsin startled reporters by quietly introducing Vladimir Lukin, on hand for the summit, as his U.S. envoy. "For me it is a great honor to be the first ambassador to the U.S.A. from a Russian democratic state," Lukin told reporters.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
U.S. Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Thursday appealed to Russian lawmakers to approve the sweeping START II arms reduction treaty, but his audience reacted with suspicion and distrust of U.S. intentions, particularly Washington's support for NATO expansion. Perry appeared before the state Duma, or lower house of parliament, just before President Boris N. Yeltsin announced the ouster of security chief Alexander I.
WORLD
November 12, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Pussy Riot leader Nadezhda Tolokonnikova is  now in a prison hospital near Krasnoyarsk in central  Siberia, a Russian official said Tuesday. “Tolokonnikova has arrived in the Krasnoyarsk territory, where she will serve the rest of her term,” Vladimir Lukin, presidential human rights envoy told the Interfax news agency. “I was told [by Russian prison system authorities] she is in [the prison] hospital at her own request.” Tolokonnikova, 24, and two bandmates were sentenced in August 2012 to two years each behind bars for hooliganism after engaging in what they called a punk prayer at a cathedral in downtown Moscow in the middle of the February 2012 presidential campaign.
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