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Vladimir Meciar

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NEWS
October 2, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters here issued a clear rebuke of Western-style capitalism Saturday, handing the party of former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar a strong election victory, according to preliminary results and exit polls after two days of voting. Meciar, who was ousted from power in March amid allegations of corruption and obstructing Slovakia's economic reforms, was expected to fall short of winning an absolute majority.
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NEWS
February 19, 2002 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the coalition that runs Slovakia won power nearly four years ago, it was united by one thing: opposition to Vladimir Meciar, then the much-hated and much-loved prime minister. The current government has vastly improved Slovakia's relations with the United States and the European Union, which were badly strained in the mid-1990s by Meciar's heavy-handed rule.
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NEWS
September 30, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can listen to his theme song on the radio, drink his personalized brand of coffee and gaze at his grinning mug on billboards across the country. Vladimir Meciar is back. Two years after whipping up a nationalist fervor that swept Czechoslovakia off the map, the heavyweight boxer-turned-politician is mounting a political comeback--leaner by about 50 pounds but still very much a cagey, determined fighter.
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | From Reuters
Masked commandos stormed the home of former Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar early Thursday and arrested him on charges of fraud and abuse of power. Police units took up positions around Meciar's villa in the town of Turcianske Teplice, about 100 miles northeast of Bratislava, the capital, and stormed in after he ignored calls to come out. He later told a news conference: "I was up there in the apartment. After an explosion, I heard that something was going on. . . .
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Reuters
The Slovak government defied a constitutional court Tuesday and provoked charges that Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar was establishing totalitarian rule by saying it will cancel a planned referendum on the presidency. The move came hours after President Michal Kovac, one of Meciar's fiercest critics, stepped down at the end of his term with no successor in place. Meciar was left to take over most of Kovac's powers.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They started it," Stefan Klemens said, "now let us finish it." Klemens, a 50-year-old delivery truck driver, had just stood in line for 20 minutes Friday in Prague's fabled Wenceslas Square to sign a petition. In effect, the petition says to the Slovak republic, lately flirting with the idea of putting an end to the 74-year-old Czechoslovak state: "Go ahead. Get lost!"
NEWS
April 21, 2000 | From Reuters
Masked commandos stormed the home of former Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar early Thursday and arrested him on charges of fraud and abuse of power. Police units took up positions around Meciar's villa in the town of Turcianske Teplice, about 100 miles northeast of Bratislava, the capital, and stormed in after he ignored calls to come out. He later told a news conference: "I was up there in the apartment. After an explosion, I heard that something was going on. . . .
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Klaus, the likely prime minister after weekend elections in Czechoslovakia, said Sunday that he will begin negotiations today with his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, on the formation of a new government. Klaus spoke with reporters after a two-hour meeting with President Vaclav Havel. Presidential aides said Havel instructed Klaus to begin the process of putting together a government.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics say Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar of Slovakia runs an authoritarian political machine based on patronage, corruption, heavy-handed pressure and disrespect for democratic rules. But such rebukes didn't seem to concern his mostly gray-haired supporters at a rally early this week ahead of crucial parliamentary elections today and Saturday. They cheered Meciar as a hero, a talented leader and a patriot who led their nation to independence.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Kanska summoned her two adult daughters to a family meeting a few weeks ago and warned them she was about to become a dissident. "I told them they might want to think about getting married and changing their names, so as not to be associated with me or punished for the noise I'm going to make," the college business professor recalled. "I cannot sit by quietly and watch my country commit suicide."
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Critics say Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar of Slovakia runs an authoritarian political machine based on patronage, corruption, heavy-handed pressure and disrespect for democratic rules. But such rebukes didn't seem to concern his mostly gray-haired supporters at a rally early this week ahead of crucial parliamentary elections today and Saturday. They cheered Meciar as a hero, a talented leader and a patriot who led their nation to independence.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Reuters
The Slovak government defied a constitutional court Tuesday and provoked charges that Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar was establishing totalitarian rule by saying it will cancel a planned referendum on the presidency. The move came hours after President Michal Kovac, one of Meciar's fiercest critics, stepped down at the end of his term with no successor in place. Meciar was left to take over most of Kovac's powers.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters here issued a clear rebuke of Western-style capitalism Saturday, handing the party of former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar a strong election victory, according to preliminary results and exit polls after two days of voting. Meciar, who was ousted from power in March amid allegations of corruption and obstructing Slovakia's economic reforms, was expected to fall short of winning an absolute majority.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can listen to his theme song on the radio, drink his personalized brand of coffee and gaze at his grinning mug on billboards across the country. Vladimir Meciar is back. Two years after whipping up a nationalist fervor that swept Czechoslovakia off the map, the heavyweight boxer-turned-politician is mounting a political comeback--leaner by about 50 pounds but still very much a cagey, determined fighter.
NEWS
December 26, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Kanska summoned her two adult daughters to a family meeting a few weeks ago and warned them she was about to become a dissident. "I told them they might want to think about getting married and changing their names, so as not to be associated with me or punished for the noise I'm going to make," the college business professor recalled. "I cannot sit by quietly and watch my country commit suicide."
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They started it," Stefan Klemens said, "now let us finish it." Klemens, a 50-year-old delivery truck driver, had just stood in line for 20 minutes Friday in Prague's fabled Wenceslas Square to sign a petition. In effect, the petition says to the Slovak republic, lately flirting with the idea of putting an end to the 74-year-old Czechoslovak state: "Go ahead. Get lost!"
NEWS
February 19, 2002 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the coalition that runs Slovakia won power nearly four years ago, it was united by one thing: opposition to Vladimir Meciar, then the much-hated and much-loved prime minister. The current government has vastly improved Slovakia's relations with the United States and the European Union, which were badly strained in the mid-1990s by Meciar's heavy-handed rule.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | Reuters
Government candidate Rudolf Schuster was declared the victor Sunday in Slovakia's presidential election, paving the way for tough economic measures planned by the coalition administration. The central electoral commission said Schuster took more than 57% of the vote Saturday; ex-Premier Vladimir Meciar won 42.8%.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vaclav Klaus, the likely prime minister after weekend elections in Czechoslovakia, said Sunday that he will begin negotiations today with his Slovak counterpart, Vladimir Meciar, on the formation of a new government. Klaus spoke with reporters after a two-hour meeting with President Vaclav Havel. Presidential aides said Havel instructed Klaus to begin the process of putting together a government.
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