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Vladimir Posner

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Direct from Moscow, it's American TV's latest smash hit: "The Posby Show." It stars Vladimir Posner. The face is open, earnest. The speech is perfect idiomatic American English, with a hint of Brooklyn. The message is Soviet. Posner, 52, the Kremlin's main man when it comes to explaining and defending his government for the American media, has returned to the United States on a PR mission, temporarily back in the country he and his parents left when he was 15.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994
Your recent hit piece (" 'Shut Up' Not In Dornan's Vocabulary," July 15) on Rep. Bob Dornan (R-Garden Grove) ignored relevant facts and important contexts in which many of the Dornanisms cited were first uttered. One particularly offensive one was your omission with regard to Dornan's criticisms of longtime Soviet mouthpiece Vladimir Posner. Where do you get off referring to Posner as a "TV commentator"? Posner may be nothing more than a second-rate TV commentator now, but he had a life before his partnership with Phil Donahue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1986
In an effort to protect his constituents from Soviet propaganda, Rep. Dornan has burned all of us with his searing prejudice. It is relevant to know that commentator Vladimir Posner is an American-born Soviet citizen. But for Dornan to call him "a disloyal betraying little Jew" boggles the mind. For eons, we Jews have suffered the unfair accusations that link Jews, generically, to betrayal. I, for one, am sick and tired of it! It is Robert Dornan who could be labeled "traitor," for by his unseemly anti-Semitism, he has betrayed the American spirit!
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out on Boylston Street, in front of a snow-covered Boston Common, a film student from Emerson College eagerly approached a familiar-looking figure. "Excuse me," Lauren Renihan, 21, said to the silver-haired man in the trench coat. "Aren't you Mr. Vladimir?" That is how identifiable Vladimir Posner has become to American followers of events in the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994
Your recent hit piece (" 'Shut Up' Not In Dornan's Vocabulary," July 15) on Rep. Bob Dornan (R-Garden Grove) ignored relevant facts and important contexts in which many of the Dornanisms cited were first uttered. One particularly offensive one was your omission with regard to Dornan's criticisms of longtime Soviet mouthpiece Vladimir Posner. Where do you get off referring to Posner as a "TV commentator"? Posner may be nothing more than a second-rate TV commentator now, but he had a life before his partnership with Phil Donahue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
We get letters . . . Heading today's topics are columns on a "60 Minutes" episode and Soviet spokesman Vladimir Posner. The "60 Minutes" column (May 21) blasted Harry Reasoner's interview of a 7-year-old boy, Marc, and his mother about the boy's claims of being sexually abused by his father. I argued that "60 Minutes" violated the child's privacy and should not have put him on national TV, regardless of the mother's approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Political Writer
Following an outcry by Jewish leaders, Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) apologized Friday for making an anti-Semitic remark on the floor of the House of Representatives. On Thursday, Dornan had claimed that there was no need to apologize for his description of a Soviet commentator as "a disloyal, betraying little Jew." But on Friday, after Jewish leaders in Orange County and Washington demanded an explanation, Dornan called a press conference in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Had President Reagan suffered a relapse of Rambo Fever? Was Sylvester Stallone writing the President's ad-libs? Well, maybe. But even an ABC News executive has agreed with the President that the network gave a Soviet spokesman too much latitude in responding Wednesday to Reagan's televised address urging congressional acceptance of his $311.6-billion defense budget.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out on Boylston Street, in front of a snow-covered Boston Common, a film student from Emerson College eagerly approached a familiar-looking figure. "Excuse me," Lauren Renihan, 21, said to the silver-haired man in the trench coat. "Aren't you Mr. Vladimir?" That is how identifiable Vladimir Posner has become to American followers of events in the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Take that , Wendy's. The July 1 coming of "Comrades"--a BBC-created, 12-part documentary view of the Soviet Union through the eyes of citizens ranging from an Army recruit to a rebellious musician--is refreshing, exhilarating sanity. Aired under the PBS "Frontline" banner, "Comrades" (10 p.m. Tuesdays on KCET Channel 28) joins an existing eclectic mix of media-shaped Soviet images, many of which confuse the Red Menace with Dennis the Menace.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
We get letters . . . Heading today's topics are columns on a "60 Minutes" episode and Soviet spokesman Vladimir Posner. The "60 Minutes" column (May 21) blasted Harry Reasoner's interview of a 7-year-old boy, Marc, and his mother about the boy's claims of being sexually abused by his father. I argued that "60 Minutes" violated the child's privacy and should not have put him on national TV, regardless of the mother's approval.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Direct from Moscow, it's American TV's latest smash hit: "The Posby Show." It stars Vladimir Posner. The face is open, earnest. The speech is perfect idiomatic American English, with a hint of Brooklyn. The message is Soviet. Posner, 52, the Kremlin's main man when it comes to explaining and defending his government for the American media, has returned to the United States on a PR mission, temporarily back in the country he and his parents left when he was 15.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1986
Let me ask Dornan these questions: 1--Did he ever refer to a person who became pro-Soviet as "that little Catholic," or "that little Presbyterian," or "that little Lutheran," or "that little Unitarian"? etc. etc. (I am sure he didn't.) But a "renegade Jew" is fair game for him. 2--Did he ever apply the descriptive term "big spender" to Ronald Reagan--who is the biggest spender of all time in the office of the presidency? 3--Why did he call Vladimir Posner a "little Jew" when he knew that Posner is no longer Jewish, that Posner turned against Soviet Jews (his own statement)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Had President Reagan suffered a relapse of Rambo Fever? Was Sylvester Stallone writing the President's ad-libs? Well, maybe. But even an ABC News executive has agreed with the President that the network gave a Soviet spokesman too much latitude in responding Wednesday to Reagan's televised address urging congressional acceptance of his $311.6-billion defense budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Political Writer
Following an outcry by Jewish leaders, Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) apologized Friday for making an anti-Semitic remark on the floor of the House of Representatives. On Thursday, Dornan had claimed that there was no need to apologize for his description of a Soviet commentator as "a disloyal, betraying little Jew." But on Friday, after Jewish leaders in Orange County and Washington demanded an explanation, Dornan called a press conference in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
ABC News' "Nightline" will air a special one-hour broadcast tonight that looks at Soviet TV as it exists today. The program, a spokeswoman says, doesn't mention ABC's "Amerika," but does include an interview of Sam Donaldson by Soviet commentator Vladimir Posner. The program, airing at 11:30 p.m. PST on KABC-TV Channel 7, also will show taped reports of Soviet newscasts that cite certain U.S. TV programs as examples of American obsessions with wealth, sex and violence.
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