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Vladimir Pozner

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NEWS
April 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television newsman who became one of the first faces of glasnost five years ago with candid programs discussing the failures of Soviet socialism has quit amid mounting fears that tightening state control of the broadcast media is again turning it into a political monopoly.
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WORLD
March 5, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
The state television center looms like a Soviet phantom from the winter mists of Moscow, a drab, massive relic that nobody has bothered to renovate. The facade is faded, but the corridors inside hum with young careerists making bright, government-sanctioned television for broadcast to all 11 Russian time zones. Vladimir Pozner, remodeled Soviet relic in his own right, strides the shining hallways, a television superstar with sharp-cut clothes, gleaming head and quick, fox-like darts of the eye.
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BOOKS
March 25, 1990 | Andrew Nagorski, Nagorski, a Washington-based correspondent for Newsweek, is the author of "Reluctant Farewell: An American Reporter's Candid Look Inside the Soviet Union" (Henry Holt). and
In the days when the Cold War was in full swing, Kremlin propagandists would listen stonily to the litany of accusations from Americans about Soviet repression and counter with one of two standard questions: "And what about your Negroes?" or "What about your Indians?" The level of Soviet-American dialogue has vastly improved in the glasnost era, but the new generation of mediagenic Soviet propagandists are still prone to the same instincts as their wooden predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
What a Pair: Speaking of Phil Donahue, the talk show he co-hosted with Russia's Vladimir Pozner, which has left syndication, is moving to cable's CNBC this fall. No date for the CNBC premiere was announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
What a Pair: Speaking of Phil Donahue, the talk show he co-hosted with Russia's Vladimir Pozner, which has left syndication, is moving to cable's CNBC this fall. No date for the CNBC premiere was announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992
Vladimir Pozner's article ("The Fruits of Racism Ripen in Russia as in Los Angeles," Commentary, June 17), which strikes an analogy between the Soviet Union's race situation and that of the United States, was insightful and provocative. I hope many will take heed, but I must say that Pozner's views spring from a mainstream American perception and ignores that America is not black and white. The riot would have been a much smaller event had not all disenfranchised members of our communities participated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991
The arrogant claim of Soviet leaders who believe they have a right to American tax dollars is, quite frankly, galling and offensive. I am referring to Vladimir Pozner's article, "Western Aid Can Win the People" (Commentary, June 11). Rather than blaming his country's economic woes on the suffocating ideology of Marxist-Leninism, Pozner instead lays the crisis on our doorstep, suggesting that it is us tightfisted Westerners who are to blame for the plight of his countrymen. The question Pozner does not address is what compelling interest the U.S. might have in the survival of the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Following the Orange Bowl, the Global Bowl. The scene is KING-TV in Seattle where Phil Donahue is zigzagging through an American audience, carrying a microphone as if it were an extension of his hand. In the front of the studio is a very large TV screen showing an audience of Soviets in Leningrad and their microphone man, Vladimir Pozner. The Americans are talking to the Soviets and vice versa. They are communicating. They are relating. They are discussing. The gap between them is narrowing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1987 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
For a while Wednesday, Vladimir Pozner wore a different hat than the one by which most Americans know him, and for which some intensely dislike him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992
Vladimir Pozner's article ("The Fruits of Racism Ripen in Russia as in Los Angeles," Commentary, June 17), which strikes an analogy between the Soviet Union's race situation and that of the United States, was insightful and provocative. I hope many will take heed, but I must say that Pozner's views spring from a mainstream American perception and ignores that America is not black and white. The riot would have been a much smaller event had not all disenfranchised members of our communities participated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991
The arrogant claim of Soviet leaders who believe they have a right to American tax dollars is, quite frankly, galling and offensive. I am referring to Vladimir Pozner's article, "Western Aid Can Win the People" (Commentary, June 11). Rather than blaming his country's economic woes on the suffocating ideology of Marxist-Leninism, Pozner instead lays the crisis on our doorstep, suggesting that it is us tightfisted Westerners who are to blame for the plight of his countrymen. The question Pozner does not address is what compelling interest the U.S. might have in the survival of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television newsman who became one of the first faces of glasnost five years ago with candid programs discussing the failures of Soviet socialism has quit amid mounting fears that tightening state control of the broadcast media is again turning it into a political monopoly.
BOOKS
March 25, 1990 | Andrew Nagorski, Nagorski, a Washington-based correspondent for Newsweek, is the author of "Reluctant Farewell: An American Reporter's Candid Look Inside the Soviet Union" (Henry Holt). and
In the days when the Cold War was in full swing, Kremlin propagandists would listen stonily to the litany of accusations from Americans about Soviet repression and counter with one of two standard questions: "And what about your Negroes?" or "What about your Indians?" The level of Soviet-American dialogue has vastly improved in the glasnost era, but the new generation of mediagenic Soviet propagandists are still prone to the same instincts as their wooden predecessors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1987 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
For a while Wednesday, Vladimir Pozner wore a different hat than the one by which most Americans know him, and for which some intensely dislike him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1986 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Following the Orange Bowl, the Global Bowl. The scene is KING-TV in Seattle where Phil Donahue is zigzagging through an American audience, carrying a microphone as if it were an extension of his hand. In the front of the studio is a very large TV screen showing an audience of Soviets in Leningrad and their microphone man, Vladimir Pozner. The Americans are talking to the Soviets and vice versa. They are communicating. They are relating. They are discussing. The gap between them is narrowing.
WORLD
March 5, 2009 | Megan K. Stack
The state television center looms like a Soviet phantom from the winter mists of Moscow, a drab, massive relic that nobody has bothered to renovate. The facade is faded, but the corridors inside hum with young careerists making bright, government-sanctioned television for broadcast to all 11 Russian time zones. Vladimir Pozner, remodeled Soviet relic in his own right, strides the shining hallways, a television superstar with sharp-cut clothes, gleaming head and quick, fox-like darts of the eye.
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