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Vladimir Slepak

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NEWS
December 1, 1987 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Only a grandparent denied the kiss of a grandchild can begin to appreciate the emotion that washed over Vladimir Slepak that day last month when he first saw the children of his two sons at Kennedy International Airport.
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NEWS
December 1, 1987 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
Only a grandparent denied the kiss of a grandchild can begin to appreciate the emotion that washed over Vladimir Slepak that day last month when he first saw the children of his two sons at Kennedy International Airport.
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NEWS
October 26, 1987
Vladimir Slepak, who struggled longer than any other refusenik to leave the Soviet Union, arrived in the West with his wife and said that freedom after a 17-year wait was "like a dream." Slepak, who turns 60 on Thursday, embraced his son, Alexander, upon his arrival in Vienna after a flight from Moscow. He was greeted by several U.S. dignitaries, including Sen. John Heinz (R-Pa.), a member of the congressional subcommittee that monitors compliance with the Helsinki accord on human rights.
OPINION
November 8, 1987 | DMITRI N. SHALIN, Dmitri N. Shalin is an assistant professor of sociology at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He emigrated from the Soviet Union in 1975
Just a few years ago, the idea that Moscow could host an international human-rights conference would have seemed bizarre. Not any more. An exchange on human rights, broadcast live in the United States and the Soviet Union a few weeks ago, underscored this point. An estimated 150 million people in the Soviet Union watched the satellite-transmitted debates between Soviet and American legislators. The picture of themselves that the Soviets gleaned from the stern lectures by Sen.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | From Reuters
Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Saturday he hoped to personally deliver to Vladimir Slepak a photograph of the Soviet dissident's grandchildren, who are living in the United States but he has never seen. Shultz said he met in Washington with Slepak's two sons in "moving, poignant, human meetings" and agreed to carry to Moscow a picture of his grandchildren. "I certainly hope I can deliver it personally," he said.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Vladimir Slepak, describing himself as a "simple Jew" turned into a symbol by circumstances, arrived in Israel on Monday after a 17-year journey through emotional anguish and physical exile in Siberia. "I have a feeling that this happened not with me, but with somebody else," said a smiling Slepak, who until he left Moscow on Sunday had been the longest-term Jewish refusenik in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
"I just can't believe it," Vladimir Slepak said Wednesday, just minutes after he had been told that his 17-year wait for a visa to leave the Soviet Union was over. Slepak, the Jewish refusenik who has waited longer than anyone else to leave, said he felt as if he were watching someone else receive approval to emigrate. Since he and his wife, Mariya, were first denied permission to go to Israel in 1970, they have watched thousands of others leave the Soviet Union.
OPINION
November 8, 1987 | DMITRI N. SHALIN, Dmitri N. Shalin is an assistant professor of sociology at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He emigrated from the Soviet Union in 1975
Just a few years ago, the idea that Moscow could host an international human-rights conference would have seemed bizarre. Not any more. An exchange on human rights, broadcast live in the United States and the Soviet Union a few weeks ago, underscored this point. An estimated 150 million people in the Soviet Union watched the satellite-transmitted debates between Soviet and American legislators. The picture of themselves that the Soviets gleaned from the stern lectures by Sen.
NEWS
November 16, 1987 | From Reuters
A group of former Soviet Jewish dissidents said Sunday that they will demonstrate at the superpower summit in Washington next month to press for increased Jewish emigration from the Soviet Union. The group, which includes Natan Shransky and Vladimir Slepak, said the main protest will be on Dec. 6. The number of Soviet Jews allowed to emigrate has risen dramatically this year, with 6,251 leaving up to October, compared to only 943 in all of 1986.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Members of four more Soviet Jewish families were told today--a day after Josef Begun and several other refuseniks got similar news--that they will be allowed to emigrate, a Jewish activist said. Vladimir Slepak, a Jew who has been trying to secure an exit visa since 1970, said emigration officials told the families by telephone that they will be notified by mail when they can get their visas.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Vladimir Slepak, describing himself as a "simple Jew" turned into a symbol by circumstances, arrived in Israel on Monday after a 17-year journey through emotional anguish and physical exile in Siberia. "I have a feeling that this happened not with me, but with somebody else," said a smiling Slepak, who until he left Moscow on Sunday had been the longest-term Jewish refusenik in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 26, 1987
Vladimir Slepak, who struggled longer than any other refusenik to leave the Soviet Union, arrived in the West with his wife and said that freedom after a 17-year wait was "like a dream." Slepak, who turns 60 on Thursday, embraced his son, Alexander, upon his arrival in Vienna after a flight from Moscow. He was greeted by several U.S. dignitaries, including Sen. John Heinz (R-Pa.), a member of the congressional subcommittee that monitors compliance with the Helsinki accord on human rights.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
"I just can't believe it," Vladimir Slepak said Wednesday, just minutes after he had been told that his 17-year wait for a visa to leave the Soviet Union was over. Slepak, the Jewish refusenik who has waited longer than anyone else to leave, said he felt as if he were watching someone else receive approval to emigrate. Since he and his wife, Mariya, were first denied permission to go to Israel in 1970, they have watched thousands of others leave the Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | From Reuters
Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Saturday he hoped to personally deliver to Vladimir Slepak a photograph of the Soviet dissident's grandchildren, who are living in the United States but he has never seen. Shultz said he met in Washington with Slepak's two sons in "moving, poignant, human meetings" and agreed to carry to Moscow a picture of his grandchildren. "I certainly hope I can deliver it personally," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1987 | MARK PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
More than 40 members of the Orange County Jewish community, including three rabbis and four teen-agers, are leaving today for Washington for a pre-summit rally for Jewish emigration from the Soviet Union. "The idea is to demonstrate in support of freedom for Soviet Jews and to do it right on the day before the summit starts," said Merv Lemmerman, executive director of the Jewish Federation of Orange County.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Eight Soviets have been denied permission to leave the country because of security reasons, a government agency said Thursday in an unusually detailed public report on emigration procedure. The Soviet Administration on Visas and the Registration of Foreigners said applicants whose petitions were rejected include Vladimir Slepak, Alexander Lerner, Yuli Kosharovsky and Valery Soifer, all Jews who have long sought to leave the Soviet Union.
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