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February 9, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
According to Vladimir Spivakov, conductor of the Moscow Virtuosi, one of the downsides of perestroika was that the Russian people sought scapegoats for everything wrong around them. As often has proved the case, the blame fell first on the Jews, then to other minorities of the former Soviet Union.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky was Russia's symphonist of exquisite, fastidious agony. Both the fourth and fifth of his six symphonies follow the composer as he squirms under the boot of a crushing-fate motif, suffers intense doubt, finds his soul by drawing out deeply felt melodies and ultimately reaches an ambiguously blazing finish of self-assertion. What fun these symphonies were over the weekend.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER
The Philadelphia Orchestra and a duo recital by cellist Yo-Yo Ma and pianist Emanuel Ax will highlight the La Jolla Chamber Music Society's two downtown music series, the society announced Monday. Eight concerts and recitals will be presented between October and June 1990. All performances, with the exception of the appearance of the Philadelphia Orchestra's will be at the Civic Theatre. The orchestra will play at Symphony Hall. The society's "International Orchestra Series" opens with an Oct. 6, performance by the Moscow Virtuosi.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES
The pitfall of virtuosity is slickness, which conductor Vladimir Spivakov and his Moscow Virtuosi did not wholly avoid in concerts during the weekend in Los Angeles and Costa Mesa. What is the point of such brilliant precision and polished elegance if Mozart's Symphony No. 29, played for some reason without pause between movements Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, emerges so streamlined and bland?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN JOHN HENKEN
Hollywood Bowl is more than a place, it is a pattern of behavior. Although on the Los Angeles Philharmonic's curious calendar the Bowl isn't even open yet, a crowd of 8,390 slipped easily into a summer mode on Wednesday evening during the season-before-the-season, a.k.a. preview week. The patriotic pops flourishes of the Fourth of July concerts aside, this week is devoted to Mozart, as practiced by a chamber orchestra edition of the Philharmonic and guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
The Moscow Virtuosi gave its first Southern California performance two years ago on the night of the stock market crash. No such excitement colored the first concert of the Soviet troupe's return visit Tuesday night, back in Segerstrom Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center--and again sponsored by the Orange County Philharmonic Society. (The ensemble was scheduled to move on to Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena on Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES
The pitfall of virtuosity is slickness, which conductor Vladimir Spivakov and his Moscow Virtuosi did not wholly avoid in concerts during the weekend in Los Angeles and Costa Mesa. What is the point of such brilliant precision and polished elegance if Mozart's Symphony No. 29, played for some reason without pause between movements Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, emerges so streamlined and bland?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1989
The Ambassador International Cultural Foundation will present more than 125 performances in 1989-90, the organization's 15th subscription season. Of the 30 subscription series, all but one will be given at Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena. Soprano Jessye Norman will open the classical portion of the season, Sept. 27. Other "Stars of Opera" events are appearances by Soviet basso Paata Burchuladze, Nov. 4; soprano Kathleen Battle, Jan. 11; mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade, March 6, and baritone Thomas Hampson, April 26. The "Great Performers" series features the Moscow Virtuosi and Vladimir Spivakov, Oct. 4; Sir Neville Marriner with the 54-member Academy of St.-Martin-in-the-Fields, Nov. 20, and the English String Orchestra under Yehudi Menuhin, Feb. 15. British stage, film and television star Claire Bloom is seen in her one-woman show, "Shakespeare's Women," Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1988 | LIBBY SLATE
For Vladimir Spivakov, the Soviet violinist and conductor who will appear tonight and Friday at Hollywood Bowl, playing a solo in a concert he is also conducting has its points. "In one way, it is more difficult, because I have two roles to fulfill," Spivakov said by phone--through a translator--from his New York management company's office. "But in another way it's easier, because there is no conductor getting in the way."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky was Russia's symphonist of exquisite, fastidious agony. Both the fourth and fifth of his six symphonies follow the composer as he squirms under the boot of a crushing-fate motif, suffers intense doubt, finds his soul by drawing out deeply felt melodies and ultimately reaches an ambiguously blazing finish of self-assertion. What fun these symphonies were over the weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
According to Vladimir Spivakov, conductor of the Moscow Virtuosi, one of the downsides of perestroika was that the Russian people sought scapegoats for everything wrong around them. As often has proved the case, the blame fell first on the Jews, then to other minorities of the former Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
The Moscow Virtuosi gave its first Southern California performance two years ago on the night of the stock market crash. No such excitement colored the first concert of the Soviet troupe's return visit Tuesday night, back in Segerstrom Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center--and again sponsored by the Orange County Philharmonic Society. (The ensemble was scheduled to move on to Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena on Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1989
The Ambassador International Cultural Foundation will present more than 125 performances in 1989-90, the organization's 15th subscription season. Of the 30 subscription series, all but one will be given at Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena. Soprano Jessye Norman will open the classical portion of the season, Sept. 27. Other "Stars of Opera" events are appearances by Soviet basso Paata Burchuladze, Nov. 4; soprano Kathleen Battle, Jan. 11; mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade, March 6, and baritone Thomas Hampson, April 26. The "Great Performers" series features the Moscow Virtuosi and Vladimir Spivakov, Oct. 4; Sir Neville Marriner with the 54-member Academy of St.-Martin-in-the-Fields, Nov. 20, and the English String Orchestra under Yehudi Menuhin, Feb. 15. British stage, film and television star Claire Bloom is seen in her one-woman show, "Shakespeare's Women," Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1989 | HILLIARD HARPER
The Philadelphia Orchestra and a duo recital by cellist Yo-Yo Ma and pianist Emanuel Ax will highlight the La Jolla Chamber Music Society's two downtown music series, the society announced Monday. Eight concerts and recitals will be presented between October and June 1990. All performances, with the exception of the appearance of the Philadelphia Orchestra's will be at the Civic Theatre. The orchestra will play at Symphony Hall. The society's "International Orchestra Series" opens with an Oct. 6, performance by the Moscow Virtuosi.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN JOHN HENKEN
Hollywood Bowl is more than a place, it is a pattern of behavior. Although on the Los Angeles Philharmonic's curious calendar the Bowl isn't even open yet, a crowd of 8,390 slipped easily into a summer mode on Wednesday evening during the season-before-the-season, a.k.a. preview week. The patriotic pops flourishes of the Fourth of July concerts aside, this week is devoted to Mozart, as practiced by a chamber orchestra edition of the Philharmonic and guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1988 | LIBBY SLATE
For Vladimir Spivakov, the Soviet violinist and conductor who will appear tonight and Friday at Hollywood Bowl, playing a solo in a concert he is also conducting has its points. "In one way, it is more difficult, because I have two roles to fulfill," Spivakov said by phone--through a translator--from his New York management company's office. "But in another way it's easier, because there is no conductor getting in the way."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1987 | HARLOW ROBINSON
Soviet violinist and conductor Vladimir Spivakov is bullish on glasnost . "In the Soviet Union now, people can feel like they are people," he said in Russian by phone from Clearwater, Fla., where he was preparing for an evening concert with his Moscow Virtuosi. "Each of us can feel like an individual, and we can believe again that history is made by individuals--not individuals by history. It all makes me very happy."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Cultural glasnost sweeps forward. Now RCA Red Seal Records has announced it has signed five Soviet musicians, including conductor Yuri Temirkanov, violinist Vladimir Spivakov and 17-year-old pianist Evgeny Kissin, to five-year contracts. "All of them are making their first long-term agreement in the West," Michael Emmerson, president of West German-based BMG Classics, said Tuesday. "I think we have a lot to be thankful to glasnost for."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1987 | HARLOW ROBINSON
Soviet violinist and conductor Vladimir Spivakov is bullish on glasnost . "In the Soviet Union now, people can feel like they are people," he said in Russian by phone from Clearwater, Fla., where he was preparing for an evening concert with his Moscow Virtuosi. "Each of us can feel like an individual, and we can believe again that history is made by individuals--not individuals by history. It all makes me very happy."
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