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Vladimir Viardo

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1990 | SUSAN BLISS
It was 1975, and Russian pianist Vladimir Viardo was beginning to command international acclaim. Preliminary requirements had all been met: a gold medal in the 1973 Van Cliburn Competition at age 23, successful tours in Western Europe, the United States and Mexico. Then--without warning or explanation--Soviet authorities barred the way. "I think it was just general policy," Viardo said by phone Saturday from New York, where he has lived with his wife and two children for the past year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Thousands of notes--entire forests of hemidemisemiquavers abuzz in activity, thickets of chords and octaves, cascades of arpeggios--tumble out of the piano when Vladimir Viardo plays a recital. And that's only in the first quarter-hour. Besides technique, the Russian pianist has stamina; he can keep up his own, hyperkinetic keyboard pace for long periods.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Vladimir Viardo is a pianist who revels in the trappings of virtuosity: the strength, speed, accuracy, extreme dynamics and stamina to conquer every challenge at the keyboard. At his Ambassador Auditorium debut Sunday afternoon, Viardo--who played a Rachmaninoff concerto at Hollywood Bowl in 1988, and a recital in Costa Mesa in January, 1990--showed again his exceptional achievement, his ability to meet any complex score on its basic terms. At 42, he is a finished and polished artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Vladimir Viardo is a pianist who revels in the trappings of virtuosity: the strength, speed, accuracy, extreme dynamics and stamina to conquer every challenge at the keyboard. At his Ambassador Auditorium debut Sunday afternoon, Viardo--who played a Rachmaninoff concerto at Hollywood Bowl in 1988, and a recital in Costa Mesa in January, 1990--showed again his exceptional achievement, his ability to meet any complex score on its basic terms. At 42, he is a finished and polished artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Thousands of notes--entire forests of hemidemisemiquavers abuzz in activity, thickets of chords and octaves, cascades of arpeggios--tumble out of the piano when Vladimir Viardo plays a recital. And that's only in the first quarter-hour. Besides technique, the Russian pianist has stamina; he can keep up his own, hyperkinetic keyboard pace for long periods.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | PAMELA MARIN
About 40 members of the Orange County Philharmonic Society dined at the Center Club following Tuesday's concert by Russian pianist Vladimir Viardo. From the Steinway, Viardo took stern command of the Performing Arts Center stage--raising an authoritative arm to shush intrusive applause just 10 minutes into his concert (between Schubert pieces) and slamming the keyboard closed after his final encore. At the small dinner party, Viardo was personable but no less commanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1988
Making his Los Angeles debut, Soviet pianist Vladimir Viardo will replace Alexander Toradze as soloist in Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 at Hollywood Bowl on Wednesday. Toradze canceled his engagement at his own request due to "an overextended summer schedule," according to a representative of the Philharmonic.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
The Glendale Symphony Orchestra will kick off its 66th continuous season Oct. 7 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion with a classical concert featuring Soviet pianist Vladimir Viardo. Lalo Schifrin will make his debut as the orchestra's permanent conductor and musical director for the six-concert season. On Oct. 22, the orchestra will perform a selection of opera love duets from "La Boheme," "La Traviata" and "Madame Butterfly." The Nov. 19 concert will feature music from De Falla and Paganini.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Called "A Season of Celebration," the 1992-93 season at the UCLA Center for the Arts promises a lineup of instrumental and vocal soloists, dance and music ensembles and theatrical attractions--including the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain, sopranos Kathleen Battle and Dawn Upshaw, violinist Midori, pianist Vladimir Viardo, the Kronos Quartet, the dance companies of Paul Taylor, Alvin Ailey and Susan Marshall, the Guarneri and Lindsay String Quartets and the Australian Chamber
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1989 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Concerts by the Berlin Radio Symphony conducted by Vladimir Ashkenazy and the Orchester der Beethovenhalle Bonn led by Dennis Russell Davies will be among 25 events presented by the Orange County Philharmonic Society in 1989-90 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Both orchestras will be making Orange County debuts, as will the Frankfurt Radio Symphony conducted by Eliahu Inbal and the Hanover Band of London led by concertmaster Roy Goodman.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | PAMELA MARIN
About 40 members of the Orange County Philharmonic Society dined at the Center Club following Tuesday's concert by Russian pianist Vladimir Viardo. From the Steinway, Viardo took stern command of the Performing Arts Center stage--raising an authoritative arm to shush intrusive applause just 10 minutes into his concert (between Schubert pieces) and slamming the keyboard closed after his final encore. At the small dinner party, Viardo was personable but no less commanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1990 | SUSAN BLISS
It was 1975, and Russian pianist Vladimir Viardo was beginning to command international acclaim. Preliminary requirements had all been met: a gold medal in the 1973 Van Cliburn Competition at age 23, successful tours in Western Europe, the United States and Mexico. Then--without warning or explanation--Soviet authorities barred the way. "I think it was just general policy," Viardo said by phone Saturday from New York, where he has lived with his wife and two children for the past year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Vladimir Viardo, the Soviet pianist who played the Third Rachmaninoff Concerto in his debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Tuesday, is a musician who takes chances. Even within the dim acoustical ambiance favored these nights by the Hollywood Bowl amplification wizards, he dared explore vast dynamic extremes. He approached the heroic climaxes with feverish bravado. In a day when romantic emotion intimidates the young--and the youthful--he seemed to find solace in sentiment.
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