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Vladimir Zhirinovsky

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1993
The ADL is dismayed that so many Russians cast their vote for the outspoken extremist and anti-Semite, Vladimir Zhirinovsky. Zhirinovsky's animus toward Jews is well-documented. His xenophobic vision of a "Russia for Russians" and his embracing of German neo-Nazis must be forcefully denounced by President Boris Yeltsin and all proponents of democracy inside and outside of Russia. Zhirinovsky will most likely attempt to appear more moderate as time goes on. However, it should not be forgotten that the Jewish minority is one of his primary targets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998
Re "Zhirinovsky Blames Jews for WWII," April 9: I am a Baptist preacher who does not agree with Vladimir Zhirinovsky's theory about the Jews. Whatever country that has Jews in it has always benefited from their wisdom. The Nazis, and not the Jews, started World War II. Judaism has given the world the two greatest gifts, the Holy Bible and our savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. THE REV. HARRY A. McGIMSEY Hemet I am shocked and disgusted beyond words by the anti-Semitism expressed by Zhirinovsky as reported in the Associated Press article.
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NEWS
November 2, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration granted a visa Tuesday to Russian ultranationalist legislator Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky for a visit to the United States, rejecting arguments that doing so will indirectly help give him political respectability. Zhirinovsky is expected to visit the United States for 14 days beginning Friday. He is scheduled to speak in San Francisco on Monday and is also expected to stop in Los Angeles, New York and Washington.
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | Pavel Lounguine, Pavel Lounguine is a Russian director whose films include "A People Too Many" (1994), about the Inuit of eastern Siberia, and "Taxi Blues," a study of rising class envy and bigotry in Russia, which won him the best director prize at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival. This review was translated from the Russian by Andrea Lanoux
Mikhail Gorbachev calls Zhirinovsky "a nobody." Alexander Rutskoi finds him "unworthy of serious discussion." Yegor Gaidar thinks he's "a mental case . . . a fascist and a scoundrel." Andrei Kozyrev sees him as "a clear-cut medical problem." And Alexander Solzhenitsyn labels him "a caricature of a Russian patriot."
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has bloodied his face in a lunchroom scuffle, threatened to throw fellow lawmakers in prison when he comes to power and pounded his fist on the podium, barking at the august assembly: "Shut up!" * All in all, ultranationalist firebrand Vladimir Volfovich Zhirinovsky has had quite a first week in the new Russian Parliament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1993
Is Vladimir Zhirinovsky (Dec. 15) receiving any PAC money from the Pentagon? HOWARD B. SCHIFFER Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1994
As part of the United States' outreach to the new Russia, President Clinton should expand the mission of the Peace Corps, recruit the patriotic Ross Perot, and offer him as a political consultant to Vladimir Zhirinovsky. E. P. MACUS South Pasadena
BOOKS
July 23, 1995 | Pavel Lounguine, Pavel Lounguine is a Russian director whose films include "A People Too Many" (1994), about the Inuit of eastern Siberia, and "Taxi Blues," a study of rising class envy and bigotry in Russia, which won him the best director prize at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival. This review was translated from the Russian by Andrea Lanoux
Mikhail Gorbachev calls Zhirinovsky "a nobody." Alexander Rutskoi finds him "unworthy of serious discussion." Yegor Gaidar thinks he's "a mental case . . . a fascist and a scoundrel." Andrei Kozyrev sees him as "a clear-cut medical problem." And Alexander Solzhenitsyn labels him "a caricature of a Russian patriot."
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never has a man been so woefully misquoted. Russian ultranationalist legislator Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky, a flamboyant demagogue on his first visit to the United States, delivered a fiery speech Monday before the nonprofit World Affairs Council with one simple message: None of it is true. The vow to annex Alaska? Slander. The accusations of anti-Semitism? Lies. The threats to create a dictatorship, shoot 100,000 citizens, deploy nuclear weapons? Bald falsehoods.
NEWS
November 2, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration granted a visa Tuesday to Russian ultranationalist legislator Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky for a visit to the United States, rejecting arguments that doing so will indirectly help give him political respectability. Zhirinovsky is expected to visit the United States for 14 days beginning Friday. He is scheduled to speak in San Francisco on Monday and is also expected to stop in Los Angeles, New York and Washington.
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He destroys Parliament sessions with a single tantrum; pays friendly state visits to North Korea and Iraq; vows to sire children in every Russian province, and now, he may be coming your way. Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the ultra-nationalist demagogue who shocked the world with his strong showing in December elections, plans to visit the United States next month, he announced Friday--if, that is, he is granted entry.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after President Boris N. Yeltsin dissolved Parliament, triggering a bloody revolt that left 143 people dead, the libel suit has replaced the Kalashnikov rifle as the chief instrument of political struggle in Russia. On Thursday, ultranationalist lawmaker Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky won a libel suit against Yegor T. Gaidar, the architect of Yeltsin's free-market economic reforms, who had called Zhirinovsky "the most popular fascist" in Russia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1994
As part of the United States' outreach to the new Russia, President Clinton should expand the mission of the Peace Corps, recruit the patriotic Ross Perot, and offer him as a political consultant to Vladimir Zhirinovsky. E. P. MACUS South Pasadena
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has bloodied his face in a lunchroom scuffle, threatened to throw fellow lawmakers in prison when he comes to power and pounded his fist on the podium, barking at the august assembly: "Shut up!" * All in all, ultranationalist firebrand Vladimir Volfovich Zhirinovsky has had quite a first week in the new Russian Parliament.
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