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Vladislav Jovanovic

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his colleagues in Belgrade struggled over details of a plan to end the NATO bombing destroying their country, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations sped through Ventura and other cities Thursday on a Southern California speaking tour. Traveling in a white Saturn with an old college chum, Ambassador Vladislav Jovanovic gave speeches to an occasionally hostile group in Montecito and a world affairs group in Westlake Village.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his colleagues in Belgrade struggled over details of a plan to end the NATO bombing destroying their country, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations sped through Ventura and other cities Thursday on a Southern California speaking tour. Traveling in a white Saturn with an old college chum, Ambassador Vladislav Jovanovic gave speeches to an occasionally hostile group in Montecito and a world affairs group in Westlake Village.
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NEWS
April 10, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may be the loneliest man in New York City. Vladislav Jovanovic, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations, sits behind tightly drawn shades that block out the spring sunshine from his offices, located in a majestic but threadbare mansion on Fifth Avenue. Car alarms blare and sirens sound from the street below. "We must do something about these," he said, gesturing apologetically at the massive frayed wall tapestries lining the curving stairway in the main hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his colleagues in Belgrade struggled over details of a plan to end the NATO bombing destroying their country, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations sped through Ventura and other cities Thursday on a Southern California speaking tour. Traveling in a white Saturn with an old college chum, Ambassador Vladislav Jovanovic gave speeches to an occasionally hostile group in Montecito and a world affairs group in Westlake Village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his colleagues in Belgrade struggled over details of a plan to end the NATO bombing destroying their country, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations sped through Ventura and other cities Thursday on a Southern California speaking tour. Traveling in a white Saturn with an old college chum, Ambassador Vladislav Jovanovic gave speeches to an occasionally hostile group in Montecito and a world affairs group in Westlake Village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1999 | JENNIFER HAMM
The U.N. ambassador from Yugoslavia will discuss the crisis in his country Thursday night at the Westlake Inn. Vladislav Jovanovic will speak on the topic "Kosovo in Crisis: Prospects for Permanent Peace" at 6:15 p.m. A panel of experts will also be on hand to ask questions in a discussion moderated by Steve Day, program director for KVEN-AM (1450).
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali on Thursday recommended an enlarged peacekeeping force to escort relief convoys in Bosnia-Herzegovina that could grow to as many as 7,500 troops and support staff. He gave no precise numbers in a report to the Security Council, but he said the current 1,500-strong force in Sarajevo could increase as much as five times, which would mean 6,000 more personnel. He did not recommend any air cover.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apparently bowing to European pressure, Serbia said Saturday that it would seek a cease-fire to halt ethnic bloodshed in the neighboring Yugoslav republic of Croatia and would accept the presence of foreign civilian observers to enforce it. The immediate reaction among European observers and Western diplomats on a sultry and rainy Saturday night was one of caution. "The proof is in the pudding. Let's wait and see," said one diplomat.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The European Community called Thursday for the nine-nation Western European Union to explore ways to reinforce its monitoring mission to stop the fighting in Yugoslavia. The declaration by foreign ministers of the 12-member EC overruled a proposal by France and Germany to seek U.N. approval for a larger peacekeeping force to keep the warring factions apart in the shattered Balkan state.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mid-level European Community officials, feeling the sting of U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III's recent criticism, began the process Tuesday of punishing Serbia with a range of economic and other sanctions, from imposing an oil embargo to barring Serb-led Yugoslavia from international sports events.
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He may be the loneliest man in New York City. Vladislav Jovanovic, the Yugoslav ambassador to the United Nations, sits behind tightly drawn shades that block out the spring sunshine from his offices, located in a majestic but threadbare mansion on Fifth Avenue. Car alarms blare and sirens sound from the street below. "We must do something about these," he said, gesturing apologetically at the massive frayed wall tapestries lining the curving stairway in the main hall.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina begins to spiral out of control, the man whom most in the international community blame for starting it all has been silent. Instead, Slobodan Milosevic, the president of Serbia who inspired and then publicly abandoned Serbian separatists in Bosnia and Croatia, has sent out signals showing he very much wants to toe the globally approved line.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two years of getting nowhere with evenhandedness in the Balkans, the United Nations has undertaken a risky change of course at U.S. insistence by seeking to isolate and undermine nationalist Serbs. But even supporters of the new approach concede it may prove to be a catalyst for further conflict rather than a deterrent, as both Serbs and Croats are now poised for another round of war. When the U.N.
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