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Vladislav Listyev

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NEWS
March 2, 1995 | Staff and Wire Reports
A prominent Russian television journalist was shot and killed as he entered his apartment building Wednesday night, police said. Vladislav Listyev, 38, gained fame as the host of "Glance," a talk and news show that symbolized then-Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev's democratic reforms.
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NEWS
March 8, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a growing rift between President Boris N. Yeltsin and one of his longtime, powerful allies, Moscow Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov threatened Tuesday to resign unless the city's fired prosecutor and police chief are reinstated. Luzhkov, a popular autocrat who runs Moscow the way the late Richard J. Daley ran Chicago, said he is the real target of the purge demanded by Yeltsin in the wake of the March 1 slaying of a television personality.
WORLD
July 13, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Prosecutors investigating the gangland-style slaying of a Moscow-based American investigative journalist were focusing Monday on the possibility that the killing was linked to his work, a view shared by many observers in Russia's political and business circles.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russians buried the most beloved victim of their post-Soviet crime wave Saturday amid an outburst of politically charged grief and an open feud between President Boris N. Yeltsin and the mayor of Moscow over who is to blame.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the left of President Clinton's podium at Moscow State University on Wednesday loomed an engraved quotation from Vladimir I. Lenin; to the right were bon mots from Karl Marx. Standing tall against a background mosaic of red flags, the smiling, relaxed U.S. President delivered an upbeat lecture on Western civics and democracy, reassuring students at Russia's most prestigious university that "you have ushered in a new era of freedom, and you can go the rest of the way."
NEWS
March 22, 1995 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two former Russian servicemen were detained here after authorities found 13 pounds of uranium-235 stashed in emptied sour cream jars in their apartment, officials confirmed Tuesday. The size of the seizure--the second in Ukraine this year--raises fresh concerns about the potential danger of nuclear materials hemorrhaging from the former Soviet Union into the hands of outlaw regimes and international terrorists.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assassination of a popular television journalist pierced Russians' perpetual armor of indifference Thursday, plunging the country into mourning and rekindling fears among the prominent that anyone of them could be next. The apparent contract killing of Vladislav Listyev stunned even jaded residents of this crime-ridden capital and spotlighted the dangers of life in a lawless metropolis, where corruption pervades the very security forces on which citizens once depended for protection.
WORLD
January 2, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
With stylish offices featuring a portrait of the Soviet secret police founder and a prestigious location alongside Red Square, Vladimir Lutsenko is one of the top go-to guys for "security" advice in today's Russia. The former military intelligence officer shrugs and laughs when asked about allegations, made by a former Russian agent before he died of radiation poisoning in November, that his men were hired out to do dirty work for the Russian special services.
NEWS
March 16, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When two masked, pipe-wielding attackers crashed through a balcony window into his bedroom at 4 a.m., all that saved journalist Alexander V. Minkin was the drapery that entangled the hit men and a crate of apples stored in the doorway that caused them to trip.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, nine of Russia's most prominent businessmen have been slain, as though modern Moscow were imitating the plot of Agatha Christie's novel "And Then There Were None." This week, the business community buried 46-year-old banker Ivan K. Kivelidi, who was poisoned together with his secretary in what police believe was a contract killing. Kivelidi was president of Rosbiznesbank and of the Russian Business Round Table, a prestigious group that represents about 270 new private businesses.
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