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WORLD
December 22, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Riot police clubbed, kicked and detained dozens of demonstrators in the Pacific port of Vladivostok in a harsh crackdown on a protest that was one of dozens nationwide by people outraged over an increase in car import tariffs. Imported used cars are highly popular among Russians, particularly throughout the Far East. Hundreds rallied in Vladivostok on Saturday for the second weekend in a row, and several hundred demonstrators refused to disperse as ordered Sunday. Police hauled them into vans Several people were beaten, and at least 10 journalists were detained.
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WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - It can take Moscow residents two hours in dense traffic to drive the first 10 miles on the highway to St. Petersburg, in the direction of their country cottages surrounded by lakes and birch groves. Then the road's real limitations become apparent. The potholed two-lane route connecting Russia's two largest cities has never been upgraded into a proper highway. Anyone who cares to drive its entire 440-mile length - mostly truckers - will need at least 12 hours. But 5,600 miles away, the government spent more than $1 billion on less than a mile of bridge connecting Vladivostok with Russky Island, previously inhabited only by a military garrison so isolated that four soldiers starved to death in 1992.
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NEWS
July 19, 1994
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the Nobel-prize winning writer, completing a nearly two-month tour across his native Russia, is scheduled to arrive in Moscow on Thursday. Russia's greatest living writer is likely to be coming home cranky. When he returned to Vladivostok on May 27 after two decades in exile, he complained of the intrusive media that greeted him. Later, as he made his way across Russia, he complained that his trip was not being given the serious press coverage it deserved.
WORLD
July 12, 2009 | Kim Murphy
For the last 12 years, Mikhail and Irina Lennikov have lived unremarkable lives, not unlike countless other immigrants who came to Canada from Eastern Europe looking for a fresh start in a prosperous and quiet land. He found a job as a software developer. She got hired in an insurance office. Their son, Dmitri, who barely remembers Russia, graduated last month from Byrne Creek Secondary School in the comfortable suburb of Burnaby.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after they last got paid, the miners of the Russian Far East are beginning to starve. By Friday, all 10,000 of them had stopped work--not, they say, out of ill will but simply because they are just too weak to handle the tough conditions underground. No coal is being extracted. The region's power plant workers, themselves unpaid for months, also are refusing to operate the stations that supply electricity to the factories, homes and port of the local capital, Vladivostok.
WORLD
July 12, 2009 | Kim Murphy
For the last 12 years, Mikhail and Irina Lennikov have lived unremarkable lives, not unlike countless other immigrants who came to Canada from Eastern Europe looking for a fresh start in a prosperous and quiet land. He found a job as a software developer. She got hired in an insurance office. Their son, Dmitri, who barely remembers Russia, graduated last month from Byrne Creek Secondary School in the comfortable suburb of Burnaby.
WORLD
April 6, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW - It can take Moscow residents two hours in dense traffic to drive the first 10 miles on the highway to St. Petersburg, in the direction of their country cottages surrounded by lakes and birch groves. Then the road's real limitations become apparent. The potholed two-lane route connecting Russia's two largest cities has never been upgraded into a proper highway. Anyone who cares to drive its entire 440-mile length - mostly truckers - will need at least 12 hours. But 5,600 miles away, the government spent more than $1 billion on less than a mile of bridge connecting Vladivostok with Russky Island, previously inhabited only by a military garrison so isolated that four soldiers starved to death in 1992.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | Associated Press
Fifteen people have been killed by diphtheria in the Far Eastern port of Vladivostok, the latest Russian city hit by the epidemic. Physicians in Vladivostok blamed the outbreak on unsanitary conditions and the migration of people to and from the region, the ITAR-Tass news agency said Friday. So far, 700 cases have been reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1988 | ROGER MOLANDER, Roger Molander is president of the Roosevelt Center for American Policy Studies in Washington.
As Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan struggle to cut the so-far elusive strategic-arms-reduction deal (START), the experts continue to bet against them. For my part, I'm not so sure. I'm down on my knees thinking of an earlier summit and begging whatever gods may be, "Please, no Vladivostok aide memoire. " Ah, Vladivostok. Late November, 1974. The train, the snow, the conviviality, the half-dozen remaining SALT I issues. And finally the nuclear deal.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
For almost 35 years, the Far East Soviet port of Vladivostok has been closed to nearly all foreigners to protect the military secrets of its Pacific fleet and air force. Now, however, in the spirit of Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's glasnost policy, Vladivostok is about to open its doors. A recent visit by a Los Angeles Times reporter, the first visit by any American journalist since 1975, was one signal of the imminent change of policy.
WORLD
December 22, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Riot police clubbed, kicked and detained dozens of demonstrators in the Pacific port of Vladivostok in a harsh crackdown on a protest that was one of dozens nationwide by people outraged over an increase in car import tariffs. Imported used cars are highly popular among Russians, particularly throughout the Far East. Hundreds rallied in Vladivostok on Saturday for the second weekend in a row, and several hundred demonstrators refused to disperse as ordered Sunday. Police hauled them into vans Several people were beaten, and at least 10 journalists were detained.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1997 | KAREN OGDEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At 6 p.m., the lights go out. Refrigerators clank to a stop and residents of this port city begin to grumble about yet another evening of cooking dinner on portable camp stoves. Periodic power outages, mounds of garbage on the streets and salaries that are months overdue are just a few signs of the decay and poverty that have gripped Vladivostok, the largest city in Russia's Far East.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | KAREN OGDEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At 6 p.m. the lights go out. Refrigerators clank to a stop, and residents of this port city begin to grumble about yet another evening of cooking dinner on portable camp stoves. Periodic power outages, mounds of garbage on the streets and salaries that are months overdue are just a few signs of the decay and poverty that have gripped Vladivostok, the largest city in Russia's Far East.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after they last got paid, the miners of the Russian Far East are beginning to starve. By Friday, all 10,000 of them had stopped work--not, they say, out of ill will but simply because they are just too weak to handle the tough conditions underground. No coal is being extracted. The region's power plant workers, themselves unpaid for months, also are refusing to operate the stations that supply electricity to the factories, homes and port of the local capital, Vladivostok.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | Associated Press
Fifteen people have been killed by diphtheria in the Far Eastern port of Vladivostok, the latest Russian city hit by the epidemic. Physicians in Vladivostok blamed the outbreak on unsanitary conditions and the migration of people to and from the region, the ITAR-Tass news agency said Friday. So far, 700 cases have been reported.
NEWS
July 19, 1994
Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn, the Nobel-prize winning writer, completing a nearly two-month tour across his native Russia, is scheduled to arrive in Moscow on Thursday. Russia's greatest living writer is likely to be coming home cranky. When he returned to Vladivostok on May 27 after two decades in exile, he complained of the intrusive media that greeted him. Later, as he made his way across Russia, he complained that his trip was not being given the serious press coverage it deserved.
NEWS
January 4, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A sampling of opinion taken on a Moscow-Vladivostok train indicated strong skepticism about Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's programs to revitalize the economy. The results of the poll, published this weekend in the weekly Moscow News, showed 71% of the travelers saying that they have a "watchful" attitude toward perestroika, or restructuring. Only 16% described themselves as "enthusiastic," while almost as many, 13%, acknowledged a "negative" attitude, the newspaper said.
MAGAZINE
April 12, 1987 | DAVID DEVOSS, David DeVoss is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer.
ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN, a never-ending war of maneuver is under way. It is a three-dimensional struggle--under sea, on the water and in the air--that pits the U.S. Navy against a Soviet fleet three times its size. The prize is control over half the world's surface. The weapons are multimillion-dollar ships and planes, as well as a vast array of sophisticated electronics that could provide the winning advantage if a conflict between the superpowers ever erupts.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When a retired New York grocer first ventured here with utopian plans for an American-style supermarket, it cost him a night in a Soviet police station. This Pacific port city, home of the world's largest naval base, was still officially off limits to foreigners. Three years later, the Soviet Union is long gone, capitalists are remaking Russia, Vladivostok is a wide-open city--and Dick Schindler, a cheerful, persistent man of 65, is about to launch his pioneer project.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blast Thursday at a large arsenal in a densely populated district of Russia's Pacific port city of Vladivostok triggered thousands of other explosions, which thundered for hours and forced tens of thousands of people to flee their homes in fear for their lives, officials and local reporters said. "It sounds and looks like the city has become the front in a war," Igor A. Kots, a correspondent for the national Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper, said by telephone from the scene.
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