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Vladivostok Ussr

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NEWS
September 4, 1988
The Soviet government will soon allow foreigners into the Pacific coast city of Vladivostok, which serves as home port of the Soviet navy and has been closed, with few exceptions, to foreigners for decades, the government newspaper Izvestia said. The newspaper said the decision "is a result of the new political initiatives of our country." Izvestia did not say when Vladivostok would become an open city.
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NEWS
March 13, 1989
The Soviet Union's first nuclear-powered cargo ship has finally docked at Vladivostok after it was stranded at sea for a week because port workers were afraid to handle it, a newspaper said. But Socialist Industry, noting that the Sevmorput was refused entry at three other ports in the Soviet Far East because of public protests, said the ship's future is uncertain.
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NEWS
March 13, 1989
The Soviet Union's first nuclear-powered cargo ship has finally docked at Vladivostok after it was stranded at sea for a week because port workers were afraid to handle it, a newspaper said. But Socialist Industry, noting that the Sevmorput was refused entry at three other ports in the Soviet Far East because of public protests, said the ship's future is uncertain.
NEWS
September 4, 1988
The Soviet government will soon allow foreigners into the Pacific coast city of Vladivostok, which serves as home port of the Soviet navy and has been closed, with few exceptions, to foreigners for decades, the government newspaper Izvestia said. The newspaper said the decision "is a result of the new political initiatives of our country." Izvestia did not say when Vladivostok would become an open city.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
For almost 35 years, the Far East Soviet port of Vladivostok has been closed to nearly all foreigners to protect the military secrets of its Pacific fleet and air force. Now, however, in the spirit of Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's glasnost policy, Vladivostok is about to open its doors. A recent visit by a Los Angeles Times reporter, the first visit by any American journalist since 1975, was one signal of the imminent change of policy.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
For almost 35 years, the Far East Soviet port of Vladivostok has been closed to nearly all foreigners to protect the military secrets of its Pacific fleet and air force. Now, however, in the spirit of Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's glasnost policy, Vladivostok is about to open its doors. A recent visit by a Los Angeles Times reporter, the first visit by any American journalist since 1975, was one signal of the imminent change of policy.
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