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April 26, 1989
Robert (Bob) Allen, a vocalist with the old Hal Kemp band whose rich, romantic voice made him a favored performer of the lazily arranged vocals of the 1930s and '40s, died Monday at his home in Stockton. He was 75 and died of cancer. Until his health began to fail he had been living in Encino, where he had retired from music but was successful in woodworking. Allen was the second featured male vocalist in the sweet-sounding Kemp band, behind Skinnay Ennis, who also doubled on drums.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Chris Barton
When Esperanza Spalding was named best new artist at the 2011 Grammys, not even the most ardent jazz fan dared believe this would usher in a new era for a marginalized genre long left out of the major award categories. Still, there was hope. Beyond the pop cultural footprint generated by Spalding's memorable coif, numerous high-profile performances and cover-ready good looks, there were acres of talent. FOR THE RECORD: Grammy jazz categories: An article about the Grammy Awards' jazz categories in the Jan. 19 Arts & Books section gave 1930s singer-trumpeter Valaida Snow's last name as Smith.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Richard Carpenter, of the Carpenters, says he is ready to make a comeback. All he needs is a partner. Carpenter, who with his sister Karen was one the most successful pop acts of the 1970s, announced on his 62nd birthday Wednesday in Tokyo that he is planning to get back into the music business. He said he will help to produce and perform on a tribute album of Carpenter covers due out late next year, then on a Christmas album and finally a solo collection of largely original material.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, August Brown, Chris Barton and Gerrick D. Kennedy
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Kelela | Singer-songwriter With its spacey textures and shape-shifting grooves, Beyoncé's self-titled album - released this month on iTunes with no warning - felt like the superstar end point to a year rich in adventurous R&B. Among the underground acts that appear to have inspired her is...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998
Here's a look at what's happening at the Ventura County Fair today, Fiesta Day: * Carnival wristband: unlimited rides noon to 6 p.m. for $14. * Seaside Park opens 11 a.m. SUNDAY, AUGUST 9 *--* 11 a.m. Seaside Park Opens 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Koi Show 11 a.m. Red Hot Kickin' Country 11 a.m. Fiesta 1590 hosts Mariachis 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Nick Duncan: Cabochons 11:30 a.m. Breeze 105.5-FM welcomes Exotic Animal Encounter 11:30 a.m. Lazer 96.7-FM's folkloric dance 11:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Like a secular shrine, the dining-room wall of Juan Diego Borda's West L.A. bungalow is decorated with dozens of classic record-album covers. "Abbey Road. " "Sticky Fingers. " "Dirty Dancing Machine. " "Lords of Acid vs. Detroit. " For Borda and Andres "Popa" Erazo, the personable and articulate two-man electronica collective known as Palenke Soultribe, the wall is both inspirational and aspirational. It's a visual nudge, as well as a testament, to their ambitions as DJ-producer-musicians focused on importing cumbia and other Afro-Caribbean rhythms into the hissing global stew that is electronic dance music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Oozing down-home charm, Reba McEntire--the reigning queen of country music--is perky, friendly and outgoing. Candor is one of her assets too. "I'll talk about anything," said the quintessential good ol' girl, whose 16th album, appropriately titled "Sweet Sixteen," is already No. 11 on the country charts. "You name it." Even K.T. Oslin? "You bet," she replied without skipping a beat. Oslin is the sophisticated, ultra-contemporary singer-songwriter who many country music insiders think is inching ahead of McEntire in the hearts of country fans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2000
Teri Thornton, 65, a jazz vocalist who won the prestigious Thelonious Monk competition in 1998. An only child born to a musical family in Detroit, Thornton saw her star rising in the early 1960s with the release of her debut album "Devil May Care" and her recording of "Somewhere in the Night," the theme song from the television series "Naked City."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | TIM MAY
Two weeks from now, when 16-year-old Tiombe Anika Lockhart shows up at the 26th Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, she will come under the scrutiny of some of the world's top athletes. They will all be there: weightlifters, boxers, rowers, swimmers, soccer players, pole vaulters, wrestlers, archers and jocks of every other stripe from all four corners of the world. They'll stop at the coffeehouse in Olympic Village and maybe order up a decaf mocha (caffeine is a banned substance) or latte.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1993
Name: Paula Prince Employer: Westin South Coast Plaza hotel Thumbs up: "Entertaining at a hotel means you get to meet people from all over the world. Occasionally there's a writer, movie celebrity or sports star in the audience. The people are usually on vacation, so it's a happy crowd. Picking out a wardrobe for this job is incredible fun, too. The need for constant wardrobe changes is every woman's dress-up fantasy."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
The Times asked its reporters and critics to highlight figures in entertainment and the arts who will be making news in 2014. Here's who they picked: Khatia Buniatishvili | Pianist The sultry young Georgian pianist Khatia Buniatishvili sneaked into Los Angeles under the radar last February for an underpublicized recital debut at Cal State L.A.'s Luckman Theatre. But her Los Angeles Philharmonic debut in January will not be so stealthy. Buniatishvili will be playing Chopin's Second Piano Concerto with another young Eastern European - Polish conductor and Indianapolis Symphony Music Director Krzysztof Urbanski, who made an impressive Hollywood Bowl debut last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
After a cancer diagnosis forced Sharon Jones to postpone an album and tour earlier this yea r, the vocalist of the Dap-Kings soul ensemble is prepping her return to music. The group's sixth album, “Give the People What They Want,” will arrive Jan. 14 via Daptone Records, according to a release issued on the band's website Wednesday. Originally set for release Aug. 6, the album was postponed after Jones was diagnosed with Stage 1 bile duct cancer in June. After being forced to shutter a string of dates and festival appearances due to her illness, Jones and the Dap-Kings also announced plans for their first show in nearly a year, with a gig at New York's Beacon Theater on Feb. 6.  RELATED: Best albums of 2013 so far | Randall Roberts Because of early diagnosis, her illness hadn't spread, but it did require surgery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013
Bert Lance Budget director under President Carter Bert Lance, 82, a Georgia banker and ally of former President Carter who served as his first budget director before departing amid a high-profile investigation of his banking activities, died Thursday at his home in northwest Georgia, Gordon County deputy coroner Heath Derryberry said. Lance had struggled recently with unspecified health problems, though authorities were unsure of his cause of death. Lance, a bear of a man with thick black hair, a rubbery neck and a distinctive drawl, was a self-described "country banker" who had served as state highway commissioner from 1971 to 1973, when Carter was Georgia governor, and also headed the National Bank of Georgia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2013 | By Mary Rourke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
George Beverly Shea, a gospel singer and songwriter who was a featured part of the Billy Graham crusades for more than 50 years, died Tuesday. He was 104. Shea, who received a lifetime achievement award at the 2011 Grammy Awards, died in Asheville, N.C., after a brief illness, spokesman Brent Rinehart of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Assn. told the Associated Press. "Bev" Shea became the soloist for the Billy Graham Evangelical Team in 1947, traveling the world with the famous preacher as part of his ongoing crusade.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Like a secular shrine, the dining-room wall of Juan Diego Borda's West L.A. bungalow is decorated with dozens of classic record-album covers. "Abbey Road. " "Sticky Fingers. " "Dirty Dancing Machine. " "Lords of Acid vs. Detroit. " For Borda and Andres "Popa" Erazo, the personable and articulate two-man electronica collective known as Palenke Soultribe, the wall is both inspirational and aspirational. It's a visual nudge, as well as a testament, to their ambitions as DJ-producer-musicians focused on importing cumbia and other Afro-Caribbean rhythms into the hissing global stew that is electronic dance music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
Terry Callier, a singer-songwriter who captivated a cult following with his quietly hypnotic baritone voice and hard-to-classify music that combined elements of folk, blues and jazz, died of cancer Oct. 27 at a hospital in Chicago. He was 67. Callier never achieved tremendous commercial success during his peak in the 1960s and '70s or in a 1990s comeback flash. But the imploring, incantatory quality of his vocals distinguished him from his peers, as did his knack for mixing elements of African chant, blues melody, jazz improvisation and folk instrumentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1993
Open auditions will be held Monday for children ages 4-9 to serve as background vocalists for "Jerry Herman's Broadway at the Bowl," a star-studded tribute to the Tony and Grammy Award-winning composer and lyricist, scheduled for June 30 at the Hollywood Bowl. The auditions will also take place at the bowl, at 4 p.m. Five children will be selected to sing "We Need a Little Christmas" from "Mame." Information: (818) 887-2284.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Tom Garvin, a jazz pianist and composer-arranger who was best known as an exceptional accompanist, died July 31 at an assisted living facility in Encino. He was 67. The cause was cancer, which diagnosed three years ago, said Tom Mitchell, a close friend. A fixture on the Los Angeles jazz scene, Garvin was "one of our town's better jazz pianists," The Times said in 1990. His specialty was accompaniment, and he did it "with a flair not often engendered by other pianists," John Gilbert wrote in 2003 in the online magazine jazzreview.com . Photos: Notable deaths of 2011: Music The many artists Garvin performed with include noted jazz vocalists Carmen McRae, Peggy Lee, Lou Rawls and Diane Schuur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2011 | Elaine Woo
British singer-songwriter Amy Winehouse was a phenomenon: a Jewish girl from a London suburb with a retro beehive, a devil-may-care attitude and a voice that channeled Aretha Franklin and Ruth Brown. Music industry figures on both sides of the Atlantic hung their hopes on her, and her breakout album, "Back to Black," did not disappoint, selling millions of copies. Less than a decade after her emergence as an original talent, she was more likely to be mentioned in the company of pop music's tragedies -- artists like Kurt Cobain, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix, whose self-destructive habits led to their deaths at the age of 27. Winehouse, a five-time Grammy winner whose distinctive fusion of jazz and soul influenced other young artists, was found dead in her London home Saturday.
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