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Vocational Education

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1996
Re: "Tracking by Interests Could Be Right Answer for Some Students" (Feb 11). Adrienne Mack: You're 12 years too late in responding to tracking and industrial arts/vocational education in LAUSD. I taught printing for 14 years. I entered the teaching profession with a love of the trade and a desire to teach it. As years went by, the school site administrator used the shop programs as a dumping ground for the school's difficult children: the emotionally disturbed, educationally handicapped, those beginning English as a second language, the hard of hearing and the blind.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 3, 2013 | By Tamar Jacoby
Instead of going through Congress and making the initiative bipartisan, President Obama acted alone in mid-November, promising $100 million in grants to specialized high schools - such as New York City's Pathways in Technology Early College High School - that prepare students for technical careers. The president's on the right track, but why make it partisan? Schools like P-TECH are an idea whose time has come - one that can be adopted by both parties and by business as well as government.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1993 | MAIA DAVIS
Ventura County parents, students and teachers will have the chance at a public hearing next month to voice their opinions about what type of vocational education courses should be offered at high schools, adult education schools and community colleges. The state Department of Education is holding a series of public meetings around the state on how to spend $114.2 million in vocational education funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
A group of adult education students held a rally Wednesday to demand greater funding for adult education programs. About 30 members of the group United Adult Students gathered at the Evans Community Adult School in downtown Los Angeles to gather signatures for petitions that will be presented to lawmakers in Sacramento on Thursday. With about 10,000 signatures already in hand, they are calling on Gov. Jerry Brown to dedicate greater funding to adult education and to keep programs located in local K-12 school districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
Most American high schools phased out vocational education years ago, motivated by complaints that it was used as a tool to "track" African American and Latino students into low-paying careers. But the idea of combining traditional academics with career training is making a comeback, and a poll released Wednesday suggests that it is popular among one particularly important group: struggling high school students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1988 | BOB WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Community colleges face a brighter future as a result of recent legislation that more clearly defines the mission of the state's 106 2-year institutions--particularly in vocational education, officials say. And for the three community colleges in the South Bay, a stronger emphasis on vocational education is likely to mean a larger emphasis on high-technology training to serve the area's thousands of aerospace workers.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | CATHERINE FOSTER, The Christian Science Monitor
Things are fine now for David Healy. He recently went free-lance after having worked as a mechanical artist in a prestigious Boston advertising agency. But high school was rough. He and academics didn't mix. "I thought regular schools were set up for other people, and not me. I didn't think I was stupid. I knew what they thought and didn't care," he said. His situation turned around when he went to Minuteman Tech. David and students like him have been called "the neglected majority."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996
The California Department of Education has some troubling news for the San Fernando Valley and the Los Angeles Unified School District as a whole. The problem, however, is that we really don't know how troubling it is. As a story by Times staff writer Lucille Renwick points out, Valley high school students are spending less and less time in vocational education courses, even as fewer Valley high school graduates are going on to state colleges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2003 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
In John Puckett's wood shop class, the more important half of the building is the part where there are no machines, no projects and no wood. His students at Katella High in Anaheim depend for their future employment on the reading, math, history and science lessons he integrates into PowerPoint presentations on framing and flooring.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1994 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing the closure of 14 vocational schools because of tougher federal criteria for paying back student loans, National Education Corp. reported a 1993 loss of $9.6 million dollars, or 32 cents a share. That contrasted with a profit of $515,000, or 2 cents a share, for the previous year. The Irvine-based company, which operates 33 vocational schools across the nation, had revenue of $355.9 million for the year ended Dec. 31, compared to $375 million for the previous 12 months.
OPINION
March 26, 2013
Re "Time to revive 'career tech,'" Column, March 21 I appreciate George Skelton's advocacy of Career Technical Education (CTE), but some of the language he uses perpetuates the widespread misconception that CTE is a fancy term for "shop. " When vocational education morphed into CTE, the point was to address the high level of literacy required for 21st century careers by infusing rigorous academics into the CTE curricula. No longer do students need to opt for academic or vocational; instead, their participation in CTE leaves them prepared for work, UC Berkeley or working their way through UC Berkeley.
OPINION
February 3, 2010 | By Gloria R. Lothrop and Ralph E. Shaffer
As The Times continues to lead the parade to charterization of the Los Angeles Unified School District, one of the most overused and misunderstood phrases on the paper's editorial page is "reform." Change is not necessarily reform. Genuine reform produces lasting, beneficial improvements and isn't concocted by editors or frustrated school boards willing to try just about anything. That was never more evident than during the debate over the current plan to allow outsiders to operate dozens of LAUSD campuses.
OPINION
January 13, 2010 | By Mike Rustigan
One repeated theme in President Obama's education agenda is that he wants the United States to have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world. As he put it in an address to a joint session of Congress, "We expect all our children not only to graduate from high school but to graduate from college and get a good-paying job." Although I applaud the president's strong commitment to higher education, he is seriously neglecting the importance of vocational training in school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2007 | George Skelton
Sen. Jack Scott, a career educator, remembers when his daughter broke the news that she was going to marry a commercial fisherman. "This guy was not too happy," the Altadena Democrat says, referring to himself. His daughter's suitor "was not highly educated; he'd never gone to college," recalls Scott, who at the time was dean of instruction at Orange Coast College, and later would become president of Cypress College and then Pasadena City College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
Under continuing attack for its high dropout rate, the Los Angeles Unified School District on Tuesday announced its latest initiative aimed at keeping students in school -- a largely bureaucratic change that district officials hope will lead to a doubling in the number of students who enroll in programs for those who can't handle traditional high schools. The change, announced with fanfare by Supt.
OPINION
August 14, 2006
Re "Misfits Need Schooling That Fits," column, Aug. 7 Bob Sipchen makes an important point. As a third-grade teacher, I see the problems with the one-size-fits-all system. We are losing so many students. There used to be many options for high school students -- vocational education, auto shop, graphic design classes, home economics. Now, with the current thinking that all students must go through a college preparatory program in high school, many are choosing to drop out. If they could have other options, they too could make many successful contributions to the work world.
OPINION
April 7, 2006
Re "Struggling Students Want Vocational Education, Poll Shows," April 6 As an exceptional-needs specialist for more than 20 years, I teach children with behavior and learning disabilities. My students are bright, motivated and eager to learn, but due to the passage of No Child Left Behind, they are being left behind as never before. Expecting my students to master grade-level standards is unfair, unrealistic and cruel punishment. My experience has taught me that a four-year university experience is not appropriate for every student.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2006 | Mitchell Landsberg, Times Staff Writer
Most American high schools phased out vocational education years ago, motivated by complaints that it was used as a tool to "track" African American and Latino students into low-paying careers. But the idea of combining traditional academics with career training is making a comeback, and a poll released Wednesday suggests that it is popular among one particularly important group: struggling high school students.
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