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NEWS
November 7, 1986 | From Reuters
Greek-U.S. negotiations on a new agreement covering operations of the Voice of America (VOA) relay station in Greece ended Thursday without agreement, a Greek Foreign Ministry statement said. The last Greek-U.S. agreement expired in 1978, but Voice of America has continued broadcasting on a year-by-year understanding between the two sides, officials said. A VOA station has been operating in Greece for more than 25 years.
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WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The Russian government has cut off broadcasts of Voice of America after a leading state media figure denounced the U.S. government-funded radio as "spam on our frequencies. " VOA's contract with the Russian media oversight agency wasn't renewed after it expired at the end of March because the Kremlin could no longer tolerate "its subversive, sanctimonious, self-serving propaganda," the Voice of Russia said in its account of the cutoff. The internal silencing of the broadcasts that beamed news and cultural programs into the Soviet Union during the Cold War represented the latest attempt by the Kremlin to eliminate media providing an alternative to those whose content and editors are controlled by the Russian government.
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NATIONAL
August 30, 2002 | From Reuters
The director of the Voice of America, Robert Reilly, resigned Thursday after less than a year in the job, the Broadcasting Board of Governors said. VOA sources said the agency had been in turmoil under Reilly's leadership, particularly over plans to set up new language services targeted to Middle East audiences but without the "impartiality" provisions in the VOA charter.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2009 | Sebastian Rotella
Six days ago, a Pakistani journalist on the run from Taliban militants landed in the United States holding a valuable key to sanctuary: a visa granting him the right to work for the Voice of America radio service for one year. But today Rahman Bunairee is in an immigration lockup in Virginia after being detained upon his arrival at Dulles International Airport. "We are concerned and upset" about the detention, said Joan Mower, a spokeswoman for the VOA, which is funded by the U.S. government.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his three days of imprisonment at his dacha in the Crimea, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was supposed to be totally isolated. Phone lines and electricity were cut. "Everything was down," Gorbachev said at his first press conference Thursday. But Gorbachev and a group of still-loyal guards were able to keep up on the events that defeated the coup by resorting to an old tool of the Cold War--international shortwave radio, particularly the British Broadcasting Corp.'
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Amid intensifying anti-American rhetoric from China's leadership, security officials ordered the expulsion of another American journalist Saturday, bringing to seven the number of Western reporters who have been ordered to leave the country since the beginning of the crackdown on the student-led pro-democracy movement five weeks ago. Mark Hopkins, a correspondent for the U.S. government's Voice of America, was summoned to Beijing's State Security Bureau and given 72 hours to leave the country.
NEWS
January 1, 1987 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, rebuffed in his effort to address the people of the Soviet Union on television, attempted Wednesday to beam his New Year's greetings there via the Voice of America, saying that "we must continue together on the journey toward lasting peace." In a 10-minute radio speech being broadcast around the globe by the U.S. government radio agency, Reagan seemed to address the Soviet leaders as much as the citizenry, linking lasting progress in U.S.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | Reuters
The Voice of America, an arm of the U.S. Information Agency, said Wednesday that it will begin Somali-language broadcasts next Monday. A 15-minute program will be on the air seven days a week starting at 5:45 a.m. Somali time. "Each program will concentrate on providing the Somali people with news and information that is accurate and fair," VOA Director Chase Untermeyer said in a statement.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Betting that Uncle Sam's propaganda can produce handsome profit, a group of investors led by Clear Channel Communications Inc. of San Antonio is negotiating to buy the U.S. government-sponsored radio operation known as Voice of America Europe. The effort to acquire Voice of America Europe, which is delivered by satellite to 180 radio stations in about 60 countries, is being spearheaded by Sherril W. Taylor, a former CBS vice president who has also worked at VOA.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | Times Staff Writer
A new "free" Soviet radio station in Volgograd--the former Stalingrad--is broadcasting Voice of America programming with transmitters once used to jam VOA and other foreign broadcasts, the U.S. agency reported Thursday. Deputy Director Robert Coonrod of the VOA said that Anatoli Yermakov, director of Station VEDO in Volgograd, put the new commercial station on the air May 20 and by next week plans to offer regular Voice of America programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Many speakers have recited the words of the 16th president of the United States as framed by Aaron Copland in his "Lincoln Portrait." "Fellow citizens, we cannot escape history," is how it begins. Carl Sandburg gave the premiere. Years later, Marian Anderson, with Copland conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra, spoke from a place deep within. Adlai Stevenson was statesmanlike yet poignant. Copland himself delivered the text as matter-of-fact straight talk, accepting its truths as self-evident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2003 | Monte Morin and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers
American officials say Cuba is jamming international television broadcasts from several Los Angeles-based stations and the Voice of America, knocking out all programming critical of the Iranian government and supportive of pro-democracy demonstrations raging there. Although the Caribbean nation has long blocked television broadcasts from the U.S.
NATIONAL
August 30, 2002 | From Reuters
The director of the Voice of America, Robert Reilly, resigned Thursday after less than a year in the job, the Broadcasting Board of Governors said. VOA sources said the agency had been in turmoil under Reilly's leadership, particularly over plans to set up new language services targeted to Middle East audiences but without the "impartiality" provisions in the VOA charter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians can send greetings to the nation's armed forces throughout the world by recording brief messages to be broadcast by Voice of America. KABC-AM (790) and the Voice of America are setting up booths at several Southland malls in coming weeks where anyone can record a 15-second message. The messages will be broadcast from Dec. 7 to Jan. 31. The Voice of America reaches 91 million listeners worldwide, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radio syndication czar Norm Pattiz, the epitome of California casual in faded jeans, a leather jacket and a deep tan, leans against a stone wall and gazes out over his hilltop estate. He gestures to the sweeping city skyline, framed by a luminous sunset in hues of yellow, orange and purple. "Master of all he surveys," he pronounces, with an infectious self-mocking grin.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With pervasive anti-American sentiment in the Arab world threatening President Bush's Middle East policy, the Voice of America wants to completely remake its Arab-language broadcasts to appeal to a younger, more radical audience. Under a plan awaiting approval by the independent board responsible for U.S.
NEWS
June 16, 1988
Voice of America officials said that Soviet authorities have indicated they will allow the U.S. government radio service to open a bureau in Moscow. The U.S. Information Agency, which runs Voice of America, applied to Soviet authorities a year ago for permission to open a Moscow bureau. USIA Director Charles Z. Wick renewed the request in informal talks with Soviet officials at the recent summit in Moscow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2001 | CAROL CHAMBERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern Californians can send greetings to the nation's armed forces throughout the world by recording brief messages to be broadcast by Voice of America. KABC-AM (790) and the Voice of America are setting up booths at several Southland malls in coming weeks where anyone can record a 15-second message. The messages will be broadcast from Dec. 7 to Jan. 31. The Voice of America reaches 91 million listeners worldwide, officials said.
OPINION
March 19, 2000 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a frequent contributor to The Times. Her oral history "State of the Arts: California Artists Talk About Their Work" will be published in October
Nobody knows Americans the way Louis "Studs" Terkel does. Since his first book of oral history, "Division Street: America," in 1967, Terkel has traveled the country, documenting the way people feel about how they live and work. The otherwise "anonymous many" have talked to him about the Great Depression in "Hard Times" (1970), their jobs in "Working" (1974) and old age in "Coming of Age" (1996).
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