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Voice Recognition

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BUSINESS
March 5, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Telephone & Telegraph's plan to replace many of its telephone operators with computerized voice recognition systems is not a dramatic technological breakthrough, but it should nonetheless help speed the deployment of machines that understand human speech, analysts said Wednesday. Voice recognition should over the next few years become an alternative to touch-tone phones in navigating corporate telephone systems.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
If organization is a vehicle that helps us achieve our goals, then time management is the oil that keeps the vehicle running. "Time management has a huge role in organization. Anything you want to do in life you have to make time for," says Julie Morgenstern, organizational guru and author of "Time Management From the Inside Out. " She approaches time management the same way she approaches cleaning out a closet. Like sorting objects into bins, she sorts tasks into the appropriate time slot.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 1988
The article by David Olmos on voice systems was very interesting, informative and accurate ("Computers: Now They Talk Back," March 24). There was, however, one glaring omission: Kurzweil Applied Intelligence has been a leader in the emerging market for large-vocabulary voice recognition. Kurzweil was the first to develop a commercial 1,000-word recognition system and the first to develop a 5,000-10,000-word recognition system. The revenue and customer base has increased dramatically each of the last three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
In a world where mobile phones, game consoles and a growing number of technologies talk back to consumers, Netflix is giving its movie and TV recommendation service a voice. Netflix has unveiled a talking, human-like interface named “Max,” who greets subscribers with a game-show host's exuberance and invites them to play irreverent games, such as “Max's Mystery Call” and “Celebrity Mood Ring.” It seeks to inject humor into the analytical process of offering viewing suggestions - and to further differentiate the service from competitors such as Amazon.com or Hulu.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1990 | BRUCE KEPPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some US Sprint customers will soon be able to phone home by simply saying "phone home." The nation's third-largest long-distance carrier said Monday that it will begin offering a service by this summer that will allow a caller to phone a destination, such as home or office, simply by talking to a computer on the line rather than dialing a series of numbers. The service will be particularly useful to frequent travelers who rely on pay phones to make long-distance calls.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Steve Wozniak used to tell all his friends about Siri. Now he can't tell why Siri's become "poo-poo. " Wozniak, one of Apple's cofounders, laid out his criticisms of Siri on Wednesday during an interview, and he did not hold back. The Woz said he first used Siri when it was a standalone third-party app on iOS and said he thought Siri was the future. "I said 'What are the five largest lakes in California?' and it came up one, two, three four five -- shocked me," Wozniak said, according to the Albany (N.Y.)
BUSINESS
May 9, 2012
When it comes to your tech tools and toys, can you name that sound? Play along. Bloo-bloop. That's TiVo. The grand and broad-sounding G flat/F sharp major chord, Baaaaah . That's the Mac startup sound. Dong-dong-dong-dong. That tells you Intel is inside. Then there's the signature cutting swoosh of an Xbox booting up. And you know that distinctive synthesized crescendo of disparate elements that resolve into a singular auditory thread you feel in your core -- Deep Note --that means you're listening to THX . Now you can add the synthesized xylophonic tink-tink -- the sound of launching Siri.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | LEE DYE
Just what you always wanted: a computer that talks back. Computer scientists have struggled for years to develop a voice-recognition system that would respond to human speech patterns so flawlessly that all you have to do is say the right word. Then, like magic, your computer will fetch the information you need, or your television set will turn down the Rolling Stones video, or your cell phone will automatically dial your boss.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
In a world where mobile phones, game consoles and a growing number of technologies talk back to consumers, Netflix is giving its movie and TV recommendation service a voice. Netflix has unveiled a talking, human-like interface named “Max,” who greets subscribers with a game-show host's exuberance and invites them to play irreverent games, such as “Max's Mystery Call” and “Celebrity Mood Ring.” It seeks to inject humor into the analytical process of offering viewing suggestions - and to further differentiate the service from competitors such as Amazon.com or Hulu.
HEALTH
March 21, 2014 | By Lily Dayton
If organization is a vehicle that helps us achieve our goals, then time management is the oil that keeps the vehicle running. "Time management has a huge role in organization. Anything you want to do in life you have to make time for," says Julie Morgenstern, organizational guru and author of "Time Management From the Inside Out. " She approaches time management the same way she approaches cleaning out a closet. Like sorting objects into bins, she sorts tasks into the appropriate time slot.
SCIENCE
June 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A human voice has no special ring to the autistic brain because areas related to reward and emotional context are not well wired to its center of voice recognition, a Stanford University study has found. The findings, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, lend support to the theory that social motivation lies at the heart of language and speech deficits that are endemic among children with autism spectrum disorder.  The social motivation theory of autism holds that deficits in communication and speech skills result from the brain's diminished ability to build a social context for human voices.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Steve Wozniak used to tell all his friends about Siri. Now he can't tell why Siri's become "poo-poo. " Wozniak, one of Apple's cofounders, laid out his criticisms of Siri on Wednesday during an interview, and he did not hold back. The Woz said he first used Siri when it was a standalone third-party app on iOS and said he thought Siri was the future. "I said 'What are the five largest lakes in California?' and it came up one, two, three four five -- shocked me," Wozniak said, according to the Albany (N.Y.)
BUSINESS
May 9, 2012
When it comes to your tech tools and toys, can you name that sound? Play along. Bloo-bloop. That's TiVo. The grand and broad-sounding G flat/F sharp major chord, Baaaaah . That's the Mac startup sound. Dong-dong-dong-dong. That tells you Intel is inside. Then there's the signature cutting swoosh of an Xbox booting up. And you know that distinctive synthesized crescendo of disparate elements that resolve into a singular auditory thread you feel in your core -- Deep Note --that means you're listening to THX . Now you can add the synthesized xylophonic tink-tink -- the sound of launching Siri.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2011 | By Rosanna Xia
It's the new iPhone's signature feature: a female virtual assistant named Siri who can take dictation for a text message, check your calendar or look up nearby restaurants, all using voice commands and with no need to lay a finger on a keyboard. But in real life, Siri isn't always as smart as she comes off in Apple's TV ads. Richard Stern of Pittsburgh recently asked Siri where the movie "Moneyball" was playing, hoping to find a showtime. Siri responded: "I do not understand moneyball.
TRAVEL
January 25, 2009 | CATHARINE HAMM
Question: I am a naturalized citizen from Germany and have lived in the U.S. for 45 years. I have a slight accent, which isn't usually an issue, except when I encounter those machine-generated voices on the phone. When I call to check a flight, I can't make myself understood. Am I the only person with a foreign accent in California? And what can I do about this? Gabriele Rau Irvine Answer: After speaking with Rau, I can say that her English, while slightly accented, is perfectly understandable.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2002 | Associated Press
Yahoo Inc. is adding voice-recognition technology to its telephone-related services, allowing consumers to call friends over the Internet by speaking their names. Yahoo Phone Card enables voice-activated dialing on Web-based telephone calls using a burgeoning technology known as Voice over Internet Protocol. The voice technology also enables users to speak commands into a service called Yahoo by Phone that reads e-mail and news information aloud. The services can be accessed on any telephone.
SCIENCE
June 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A human voice has no special ring to the autistic brain because areas related to reward and emotional context are not well wired to its center of voice recognition, a Stanford University study has found. The findings, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, lend support to the theory that social motivation lies at the heart of language and speech deficits that are endemic among children with autism spectrum disorder.  The social motivation theory of autism holds that deficits in communication and speech skills result from the brain's diminished ability to build a social context for human voices.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Charles Schwab Corp., the biggest U.S. discount broker, began offering investors the ability to buy or sell 1,300 mutual funds by speaking to a computer that recognizes vocal commands. The San Francisco-based broker, known for its innovation in technology, plans to expand the service to include the trading of stocks, bonds and other securities. VoiceBroker, available in four states, recognizes major U.S. regional accents.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2001 | MICHAEL LIEDTKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Adam Burg used to lug his laptop computer to the mountains on his frequent skiing trips so he could log on to the Internet and check the latest weather reports. Now all he needs is his cell phone. With a phone call to a toll-free number, Burg, 27, simply asks for the latest weather report wherever he is and is told in a matter of seconds. If he wants to find a nearby Chinese restaurant or find out what's playing at movie theaters, he can find that out by just speaking a few words into the phone.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
In the movies, computers are always good listeners. In real life, they hear only what they want to hear. Much as people would like to speak with their machines, to browse the Internet by voice rather than keystroke, recent strides in speech recognition technology hardly provide the ease and spontaneity of a free-flowing dialogue between humans. Instead, the machines monopolize the discussion.
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