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Voicemail

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours before he was killed, Nick Markowitz thought he was finally going home. It had been a strange, often scary two-day odyssey since a group of young men had snatched him off the street in his West Hills neighborhood and carted him up the coast to Santa Barbara, according to testimony before a Santa Barbara County grand jury released last week.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 2000 | Associated Press
EVoice, which is being rolled out nationwide today, joins a crowded field of "unified messaging services" that can direct phone calls, e-mail and faxes to a single in box. Users pick up messages by dialing in with a phone or logging on to a Web site, where voicemail is delivered as an e-mail with an audio attachment. EVoice's service distinguishes itself on the voicemail side as the first that doesn't require users to give out a separate phone number for would-be callers to leave a message.
OPINION
April 14, 2002
Once upon a time there was a society where real people answered their own office telephones. They lifted the receiver, curious to know who was calling. "Hello?" they said. They talked to the caller, back and forth, just like a conversation. When done, they hung up and thought that was normal. If the call recipient was absent, a co-worker jotted a message on a small piece of pink paper. "While You Were Out" slips accumulated until the person came back and politely returned the calls.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1999 | Reuters
Irvine-based Blue Diamond Software is launching a service that gives users free voicemail in exchange for listening to ads when they access the service. The company said its EchoBuzz service will be available in Los Angeles and Orange counties in April. The service targets people 12 to 24 years old who do not have their own phones. Users may pre-register for a voicemail box by logging onto the service's Web site.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1990 | TOM PETRUNO
The recent plunge in the stock of Santa Barbara-based Digital Sound Corp. appears to suggest that the firm is an endangered player in the booming voicemail business. But industry analysts and Digital's own customers doubt that the company's problems are anything more than temporary. Digital remains a highly respected competitor in voicemail technology; it just has to relearn how to market its leading-edge equipment, industry experts say.
NEWS
June 17, 2001
Q: Is it illegal or unethical for a customer to transfer a voicemail from you to another person in his office and that person plays it to your boss? --J.G., Los Angeles A: No. By its very nature, voicemail is a recording that can be played back at a later date. When you send a voicemail, you need to recognize that your words may come back to haunt you.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2002 | Associated Press
A top Hewlett-Packard Co. executive said he feels violated by the release of a voicemail to him from Chief Executive Carly Fiorina but pledged that "our honor will be restored" in the upcoming trial over the Compaq Computer Corp. acquisition.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Board of Education on Tuesday approved a recommendation to allow Pasadena Unified schools to begin using computerized voice-mail systems like those used by businesses. A voice-mail system now at John Muir High School will be permanently extended free to its four feeder elementary schools--Longfellow, Cleveland, Willard and Jackson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998 | DANA PARSONS
As a guy who would have done just fine living on the prairie in 1870 with only the hoot owls to talk to, I've had to adjust to voicemail. A bit of an intrusion, isn't it? And presumptuous? Sheesh. Nowadays, no matter how isolated you want to be, they can get to you. At home, I wouldn't even have a standard message machine if it weren't for my far-flung relatives. My closest friends know I don't have time for their stupid little problems. If one of them calls and I'm not home, they can call back.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN
Technology has become so commonplace at work that we often take it for granted. But the legal ramifications of using it should be given some serious thought. From voicemail to electronic mail to the Internet global computer network, employers have broad legal authority to monitor how their workers use technology on the job. Communications and transactions that are presumed to be private rarely are.
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