Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVojislav Kostunica
IN THE NEWS

Vojislav Kostunica

NEWS
October 3, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the opposition tightened the screws with strikes and roadblocks, President Slobodan Milosevic fought back Monday in a rare address to the nation in which he attacked his opponents as puppets of the West who would lead Serbs to extermination. In a 20-minute speech on state-run television, the defiant leader said his main rival, Vojislav Kostunica, who, like Milosevic, has won popularity by attacking the West, isn't the opposition's "real boss."
Advertisement
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Denying the opposition's claim to victory over Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, the state-controlled Federal Electoral Commission on Tuesday said a runoff election must be held because no presidential candidate won an outright majority.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition members were expelled early Monday from the federal commission certifying the results of Yugoslavia's weekend elections, adding to widespread suspicion that President Slobodan Milosevic is trying to fake a victory. But Vojislav Kostunica, the opposition candidate backed by a coalition of 18 parties, told reporters that he considered himself president-elect, based on unofficial results showing him with 55.3% of the vote to Milosevic's 34.3%.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As unofficial results from national elections trickled in through the night, supporters of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and his chief rival, Vojislav Kostunica, both claimed victory in the early hours today. But after a day of voting that the opposition said was rife with tampering and intimidation, many here were still doubting that Milosevic would accept the results if he lost.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with the strongest challenge in his 13 years of rule, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is fighting for reelection Sunday amid Western and opposition fears that he will win the only way the polls say he can: through massive vote fraud. Milosevic is losing his almost hypnotic hold over most Serbs, who once revered him as a national hero. If he steals the election Sunday, or in a second round, Milosevic will have sacrificed his last vestige of legitimacy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|