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Vojislav Seselj

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WORLD
February 12, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hard-line Serbian leader Vojislav Seselj said he had learned that he was being indicted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague and would go voluntarily to the court this month. Seselj, head of the ultra-nationalist Serbian Radical Party, came in second in December's presidential election in Serbia. He said he had not committed war crimes during the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s.
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WORLD
February 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Serbian ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj declined to enter a plea at the Hague war crimes tribunal to charges of "ethnic cleansing," emulating the courtroom defiance of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Seselj accused the U.N. court of torture -- forcing him to wear a flak jacket -- as he faced 14 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity in Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Serbia between 1991 and 1993.
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WORLD
February 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Serbian ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj declined to enter a plea at the Hague war crimes tribunal to charges of "ethnic cleansing," emulating the courtroom defiance of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. Seselj accused the U.N. court of torture -- forcing him to wear a flak jacket -- as he faced 14 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity in Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Serbia between 1991 and 1993.
WORLD
February 25, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin and Zoran Cirjakovic, Special to The Times
The surrender of one of the most aggressive nationalist Serbs to the United Nations war crimes court Monday removed a controversial politician from the Serbian scene and could ease the way for more moderate figures to lead this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998
Re "War-Crimes Court Makes a Case for Itself," April 25: Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia is reported to say that conducting the tribunal's first war crimes trial "was like building an airplane, and we didn't know whether it would fly." Then she claims that "it did fly, and it landed safely." There is no doubt about the tribunal's taking off, but it is hard to see how the claim of "landing safely" can be justified while the planners and perpetrators of the most vicious crimes against humanity in Europe since World War II are still at large.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new mayor here has already ordered city offices to remain open an extra three hours so that more business can get done. He routinely receives visits from residents petitioning his help. More than 120 signed up to see him this week. But don't ask him to talk to the international media. "I have no time for foreign journalists!" he bellows from his office, where his 6-foot-plus frame fills the door.
WORLD
February 15, 2003 | From Associated Press
The U.N. war crimes tribunal Friday indicted Serbian ultra-nationalist Vojislav Seselj, a key ally of ousted Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, for alleged war crimes in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Seselj said he had known for weeks that the tribunal was preparing a warrant for his arrest. "I will go on my own. I will not let anyone arrest me," Seselj told reporters in Belgrade, the Serbian capital. "I shall go when it pleases me." He said he booked a flight to the Netherlands for Feb.
WORLD
February 25, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin and Zoran Cirjakovic, Special to The Times
The surrender of one of the most aggressive nationalist Serbs to the United Nations war crimes court Monday removed a controversial politician from the Serbian scene and could ease the way for more moderate figures to lead this country.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | From Reuters
A Belgrade court has banned the latest book by Yugoslav dissident Vojislav Seselj as containing untrue material that could disturb the public, the newspaper Vecernje Novosti said Tuesday.
WORLD
December 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
About 30,000 Serbs protested outside the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade in defense of Radical Party leader Vojislav Seselj, now 22 days into a hunger strike at The Hague's war crimes tribunal. The ultranationalist Radicals accused Washington and the United Nations of seeking to kill Seselj, who has been in detention for almost four years. He surrendered to answer charges of war crimes against non-Serbs in the 1990s and plotting crimes with the late President Slobodan Milosevic.
WORLD
February 15, 2003 | From Associated Press
The U.N. war crimes tribunal Friday indicted Serbian ultra-nationalist Vojislav Seselj, a key ally of ousted Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, for alleged war crimes in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Seselj said he had known for weeks that the tribunal was preparing a warrant for his arrest. "I will go on my own. I will not let anyone arrest me," Seselj told reporters in Belgrade, the Serbian capital. "I shall go when it pleases me." He said he booked a flight to the Netherlands for Feb.
WORLD
February 12, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hard-line Serbian leader Vojislav Seselj said he had learned that he was being indicted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague and would go voluntarily to the court this month. Seselj, head of the ultra-nationalist Serbian Radical Party, came in second in December's presidential election in Serbia. He said he had not committed war crimes during the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998
Re "War-Crimes Court Makes a Case for Itself," April 25: Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia is reported to say that conducting the tribunal's first war crimes trial "was like building an airplane, and we didn't know whether it would fly." Then she claims that "it did fly, and it landed safely." There is no doubt about the tribunal's taking off, but it is hard to see how the claim of "landing safely" can be justified while the planners and perpetrators of the most vicious crimes against humanity in Europe since World War II are still at large.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new mayor here has already ordered city offices to remain open an extra three hours so that more business can get done. He routinely receives visits from residents petitioning his help. More than 120 signed up to see him this week. But don't ask him to talk to the international media. "I have no time for foreign journalists!" he bellows from his office, where his 6-foot-plus frame fills the door.
WORLD
October 9, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The ultranationalist Serbian Radical Party unanimously reelected war crimes defendant Vojislav Seselj as its leader and pledged to protect Serbia's national interests if the party takes power. Deputy leader Tomislav Nikolic told a packed hall in Belgrade, the capital, that the party had suffered three tough years since it "bade farewell to Seselj and sent him to The Hague to defend the honor of Serb fighters."
WORLD
June 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Hard-line nationalist Tomislav Nikolic won the most votes in the election for the republic of Serbia's president but is expected to face an uphill challenge to defeat popular reformer Boris Tadic in a runoff this month. Nikolic, whose Radical Party is led by war crimes suspect Vojislav Seselj, now detained in The Hague, finished first in the field of 15 with 30.1% against 27.3% for Tadic, according to projections.
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