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Volcanic Eruption

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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | DEAN FOSDICK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
They call this wind-scoured place "hell with the fires burned out," a desert of pumice and ash piled 700 feet deep by the most powerful series of volcanic blasts this century. Geologists continue trying to sort out the plumbing beneath Novarupta Volcano, which erupted in June, 1912, with a force 10 times that of the Mt. St. Helens explosion a decade ago.
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SCIENCE
April 3, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
A brief video of bison purportedly “running for their lives" to escape a pending eruption of Yellowstone National Park's "super-volcano" had federal officials scrambling Thursday to allay fears in the region recently rattled by a spate of earthquakes. No wonder. The video spawned dozens of news reports, including one on CNN, attempting to answer this question: Can animals predict a major earthquake or eruption? The spreading anxiety was caused by baseless rumors and deliberate misrepresentations of what those bison were actually doing in the video, according to Leo Leckie, a sales associate of the nonprofit Yellowstone Assn., an educational partner of Yellowstone National Park.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1986
Another year has thundered along and still the homeless are unfed and unsheltered. Except for the dedicated efforts of some individual charity organizations, no massive drive has been initiated by the government to cope with this horrendous problem. You have only to go to the various soup kitchens to watch tired mothers bringing in little children; or feverish and miserable men and women shivering from a night spent on the ground near a railway track; or listen to a couple who had been sleeping in their car, with no money for gas or food.
SCIENCE
July 15, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It began as series of small shuddering earthquakes beneath Alaska's Mt. Redoubt that gradually coalesced into a high-frequency "scream," according to seismologists. While scientists could only guess as to what triggered the vibrations, there was no question about what happened next: The seismic scream was followed by 30 seconds of silence, and then a series of volcanic eruptions -- 20 over a two-week period -- that launched an enormous plume of ash resembling a mushroom cloud. In a study published recently in Nature Geoscience, researchers examined data from the 2009 eruption and concluded that the sustained vibrations were caused by numerous so-called stick-slip movements on faults more than a mile beneath the volcano.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | Reuters
Authorities on Sunday outlined the toll of destruction from a volcanic eruption three days earlier that forced thousands to flee their homes. The 3,220-foot Cerro Negro volcano, near the city of Leon in northwestern Nicaragua, rained fireballs and ash on nearby villages when it erupted late Thursday, knocking in the roofs of at least 40 homes. At least 10,000 peasants were evacuated from the area, and another 12,000 might have to be moved, Presidency Minister Antonio Lacayo said Sunday.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
British researchers have found "the first unambiguous evidence" that small changes in gravity can precede a volcanic eruption. In an article published today in the journal Nature the researchers report that gravity increased at the Poas volcano in Costa Rica over a two-year period before the volcano erupted in April and May of 1989. The increased gravity was thought to result from the intrusion of dense molten rock into the volcanic cone.
NEWS
November 18, 1985 | Associated Press
British rescuers listened today for signs of life under the mud of a volcanic eruption that killed more than 22,000 people, and geologists warned that increased tremors around smoking Nevado del Ruiz may signal more activity. The British pressed their search despite a government minister's belief that there is "no one left to rescue." "The last three survivors were rescued this morning in Armero, and I believe they later died," Health Minister Rafael Zubiria said Sunday.
NEWS
July 7, 1986 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Pope John Paul II on Sunday knelt on the desolate and still-dangerous mud bank where 23,000 Colombians were buried alive last November after a volcanic eruption and asked God to "dry the tears" of the survivors.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | Jack Smith
I was hoping that our recent earthquake would cause my wife to reconsider her plans for remodeling our house. I was sitting in our living room with her sister Suzie when it came. As a veteran of earthquakes, I felt that it was bigger than the 4.5 it was later reported to be. Suzie grabbed the arms of her chair. She was obviously scared. Trying to reassure her, I said, "It's only an earthquake." My wife was not home. She had gone to a retreat in Malibu. I don't know why she goes to retreats.
NEWS
December 7, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and European scientists warned here Monday that mammoth volcanic eruptions have been occurring somewhere in the world on an average of once every 100 years, and when the next one strikes it is likely to cause enormous disruptions to modern life.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Mary Forgione
The Tungurahua volcano in central Ecuador spewed gas and ash Monday, prompting the government to issue an alert and the evacuation of villages near the volcano. The U.S. Embassy in Quito issued an emergency message to caution Americans about traveling near Tungurahua, which means "Throat of Fire" and is located 80 miles southeast of capital Quito. The message singled out the tourist town of Banos and areas where voluntary evacuations are under way in Cusúa, Juive Grander and Chico.
TRAVEL
November 14, 2010
1. Indonesia Thousands of Indonesians last week were reeling from the effects of the tsunami last month and of volcanic eruptions that have killed hundreds of people. But government officials continue to insist that the disasters had affected tourism only in specific areas and that Indonesia was still a safe vacation destination. Mt. Merapi, on the island of Java, continued to erupt, for a time closing airports as far away as the capital, Jakarta, last week and forcing President Obama to cut short a trip to Indonesia.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2010 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Rock tours can fall apart for any number of reasons, but it's rare that a volcanic eruption prevents an artist from hitting the road. Yet that's what happened to English electronic music pioneer Gary Numan this year. Set to play a Sunday night set at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, Calif., in April, Numan was forced to cancel not only that appearance but also a string of small club dates after ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano erupted, forcing airlines to ground thousands of flights out of Europe.
WORLD
November 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesian volcanoes spewed hot ash, molten rock and clouds of dark smoke, and scientists warned that a violent eruption could happen at any moment. The most threatening was Mt. Kelud on densely populated Java island, where a dome of magma was forming under a crater lake and soaring temperatures overheated monitoring equipment. A few hundred miles away, Anak Krakatoa, or "Child of Krakatoa," fired pumice and lava onto its slopes off the northern tip of Java.
WORLD
November 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of tremors rocked a deadly Indonesian volcano today in signs that a powerful eruption could be imminent, scientists said. The intensity and frequency of the tremors at Mt. Kelud already exceed those in the days preceding the last time it blew its top in 1990, killing more than 30 people.
WORLD
July 16, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities stockpiled food and readied evacuation centers southeast of Manila, the Philippine capital, after lava began trickling down the slopes of Mayon volcano in a "quiet eruption." Low clouds obscured the near-perfect cone of the 8,118-foot mountain, but officials said they wouldn't order an immediate evacuation because a possible violent eruption could be weeks away.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2010 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Rock tours can fall apart for any number of reasons, but it's rare that a volcanic eruption prevents an artist from hitting the road. Yet that's what happened to English electronic music pioneer Gary Numan this year. Set to play a Sunday night set at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, Calif., in April, Numan was forced to cancel not only that appearance but also a string of small club dates after ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano erupted, forcing airlines to ground thousands of flights out of Europe.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | ERIC TALMADGE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was the first time Tomiharu Sogabe had been back to his butcher shop and grocery store in more than a year. What he found when he unlocked the door was worse than he had feared. Potato chips and cookies were strewn across the floor, along with stationery, batteries and cooking oil. Weasels and rats had looted the place and left behind piles of scat. Spiders the size of a man's hand crawled on the walls. The electricity was out, leaving the tiny store dark and dank. Worst of all was the smell.
WORLD
June 15, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Rescuers dug through debris today as they tried to reach two people trapped the previous day in an underground shelter when Indonesia's most volatile volcano erupted. The eruption nearly enveloped a village with a searing gas cloud and forced thousands of residents to flee, just a day after officials lowered the alert level and people returned to their homes around Merapi volcano. Scientists had thought the 9,700-foot volcano was calming down after weeks of activity.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A volcano on an uninhabited island was erupting again after 10 days of relative calm. The eruption shot a cloud of ash almost 6 miles high. Augustine Volcano had been quiet for 20 years until early January, when an eruption dusted the Kenai Peninsula with ash. The National Weather Service issued an ash advisory for Kodiak Island to the southeast. The 4,134-foot volcano is about 180 miles from Anchorage.
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