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WORLD
August 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
An Indonesian volcano that had been dormant for more than four centuries erupted for the second day in a row Monday, spewing white clouds of smoke and ash more than 2,000 yards into the air, officials and witnesses said. Thousands of people living along the slopes of Mt. Sinabung in North Sumatra province have been evacuated to emergency shelters, mosques and churches, said Priyadi Kardono, a spokesman for the National Disaster Management Agency. Their abandoned villages and crops are blanketed in heavy, gray soot.
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TRAVEL
March 14, 2014 | By Dean Kuipers
MONTALCINO, Italy - " Scusi ," I said to a well-dressed man in this medieval Tuscan village, where even the gas station was somehow part of the farming landscape. "Can you tell me how to get to Castiglion del Bosco?" "Hmm, yes," he said in English, taking my map, then, " Un momento . " He dialed his cellphone, and I realized he was asking someone for the best route. Not the first or last time we found the Italians to be incredibly helpful. "I can tell you how to get there, but my wine is much better," he said, laughing.
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SCIENCE
February 17, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
For 100,000 years, a pod of cool magma has been sitting mostly immobile beneath the Mt. Hood volcano. Consider it cold storage.  As long as the magma stays cool, the volcano will not erupt. Cool magma is like peanut butter straight from the fridge - difficult to move. But if the conditions are right, that magma can liquefy in just a few months, potentially leading to an eruption, according to new research. Hot magma from deep in the Earth's crust bubbles up, mixes with the cool magma and causes it to liquefy.
TRAVEL
March 7, 2014 | By Rosemary McClure
GRANADA, Nicaragua - I came to Nicaragua to climb a volcano, to listen to howler monkeys scream in the trees of a rain forest and to walk along a deserted beach, watching the sun flame out at the end of day, turning the sea and sky ablaze. I did all those things and more in this star-crossed Central American nation, a place where culture, history and nature combine to offer visitors some of the hemisphere's most diverse experiences. Nicaragua, which calls itself "the next Costa Rica," has much to commend it: large tracts of nature reserves; sleepy surf towns; dozens of volcanic peaks; rain forests rich with biodiversity; seemingly endless, undeveloped beaches; and charming colonial cities alive with culture.
WORLD
May 13, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- Mexican officials are preparing evacuation routes and shelters for tens of thousands of people who live in the shadow of Popocatepetl, a giant volcano 40 miles southeast of Mexico City. "Popo," as the volcano is known, has displayed a "notable increase in activity levels" in the last few days, including tremors and explosive eruptions, according to a statement from the federal government. Webcams have shown large chunks of molten rock spewing from the crater, and ash has rained down on the nearby city of Puebla.  On Sunday, Mexico's National Center for Disaster Prevention elevated its warning level to "Yellow Phase 3," the fifth stage of a seven-stage warning scale.
SCIENCE
November 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A volcano may be stirring more than a half-mile beneath a major ice sheet in Antarctica, raising the possibility of faster base melting that could ultimately affect climate. Seismologists working in a mountainous area of Marie Byrd Land in western Antarctica detected a swarm of low-magnitude earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 similar to those that can precede volcanic eruptions, according to a study published online Sunday in Nature Geoscience. The area of activity lies close to the youngest in a chain of volcanoes that formed over several million years, and the characteristics and depth of the seismic events are consistent with those found in volcanic areas of Alaska's Aleutian Islands, the Pacific Northest, Hawaii and Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, the study concludes.
WORLD
April 16, 2010
Slovakia is closing its air space due to the volcanic ash cloud drifting from Iceland. Air Navigation Services spokeswoman Aniko Fodorova says the country's air space will be closed from 3 p.m. Friday. Fodorova says the closure is expected to remain in place until Sunday evening. Slovak President Ivan Gasparovic plans to travel by car to Krakow, Poland, for Sunday's state funeral of late President Lech Kaczynski.
WORLD
March 13, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
The Japanese weather agency has reported that a volcano in southern Japan began spewing ash and rock even as the country struggled to recover Sunday from the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami. Japan's Meteorological Agency issued a warning Sunday that the Shinmoedake volcano resumed activity after lying dormant for a couple of weeks. The volcano is on Kyushu island, about 950 miles from the epicenter of Friday's magnitude 9.0 earthquake, which devastated much of the country's northeastern coast.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
This is a good time to keep in touch with your airline if you plan to fly in the next few days to Europe because there is a chance that ash from the huge volcanic eruption in Iceland over the weekend could delay or even cancel your flight. Even as Iceland’s main airport prepared to possibly reopen Monday, Europe was on watch for potential flight disruptions as the ash cloud drifted toward the Continent.   "There is a strong possibility that parts of the ash cloud may impact parts of Scotland and Ireland in the coming 24 hours," Eurocontrol , the European air traffic management agency, said on its website Monday, citing reports from the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre in London.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Qantas and Virgin Australia canceled flights that were scheduled Thursday (Australia time) to New Zealand and the western Australian city of Perth as an ash cloud from a Chilean volcano continued to spread into the area and strand thousands more travelers. The cloud has also wreaked havoc in South America . Disruptions of air travel in various parts of the world could last for months, experts say. The Sydney Morning Herald dubbed the cloud over Perth the "plume of gloom" and explained that levels of ash as low as 15,000 feet posed a safety risk for airlines.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
An unusual swarm of volcanic eruptions over the last 14 years may be partially responsible for the slowing of global warming, a new report suggests. The 17 eruptions from 1998-2012 pumped sulfur dioxide into Earth's upper atmosphere, where it formed liquid particles that reflected more sunlight back to space, moderating the larger-scale warming of the planet surface, according to the study published online Monday in Nature Geoscience. PHOTOS: Erupting volcanoes Adding the volcanic activity into calculations effectively reduced the discrepancy between observed temperature trends and the models that underpin the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's reports on climate change attributable to human activity.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
For 100,000 years, a pod of cool magma has been sitting mostly immobile beneath the Mt. Hood volcano. Consider it cold storage.  As long as the magma stays cool, the volcano will not erupt. Cool magma is like peanut butter straight from the fridge - difficult to move. But if the conditions are right, that magma can liquefy in just a few months, potentially leading to an eruption, according to new research. Hot magma from deep in the Earth's crust bubbles up, mixes with the cool magma and causes it to liquefy.
WORLD
February 14, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
At least three people were killed and tens of thousands forced to flee their homes when a volcano erupted on Indonesia's most populous island, shutting down airports and showering the region with ash and grit. The eruption of Mt. Kelud in Java began late Thursday night and could be heard as far as 125 miles away, according to local news reports . “The eruption sounded like thousands of bombs exploding,” Ratno Pramono, a 35-year-old farmer from the nearby village of Sugihwaras, told the Associated Press.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
In the northeast of China, at the Yixian and Jiufotang formations, scientists have discovered thousands of exquisitely preserved fossils of plants and birds, dinosaurs and mammals. Together they make up the Jehol Biota -- an ecosystem, preserved in ash, that dates back nearly 130 million years. Some of these fossils are so complete that researchers can determine what a dinosaur had for breakfast on the day it died. Others include impressions of an animal's muscles and skin, as well as hair, feathers and scales.  The fossils tell us that back in the lower Cretaceous period this land was humid, and dotted with conifer forests and lakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
It's an idea that's easy to grasp: Justin Vernon onstage in Los Angeles the week before the Grammy Awards. Two years ago, after all, the singer-songwriter and his Wisconsin band Bon Iver were named best new artist at the Grammys, and “Bon Iver, Bon Iver” -- a modest masterpiece of deep-feel introspection -- won the prize for alternative music album. So it seems natural that Vernon would return to town for the annual crush of concerts and parties that takes place during the run-up to “music's biggest night,” set this year for Jan. 26. PHOTOS: Concerts by the Times Only Vernon didn't draw a sold-out crowd to the Fonda Theatre on Saturday with Bon Iver.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
We all know that reading a novel can transport you, delight you and intrigue you while you're reading it. Now, thanks research by scientists at Emory University, we know that immersing yourself in a novel causes measurable physical changes in the brain that can be detected up to five days after the reader closes the book. The Emory researchers, in a paper for the journal Brain Connectivity, compared the effect to “muscle memory.” "The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," neuroscientist Gregory Berns said, according to a report in the journal Science Codex . "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense.
WORLD
May 29, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Guatemala's capital was under a state of emergency and its airport closed Friday after the Pacaya volcano spewed black ash for miles in the southern part of the country. Television reporter Anibal Archila who had been covering the eruption was found dead by colleagues after being caught in a blizzard of rocks and debris. More than 65 people were injured and hundreds of homes damaged, according to news reports. Officials said three children between the ages of 7 and 12 were missing.
WORLD
May 14, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Mexico's giant Popocatepetl volcano may generate lava flows, explosions of "growing intensity" and ash that could reach miles away, the National Center for Disaster Prevention said Monday. Officials were preparing evacuation routes and shelters for thousands of people who live in the shadow of Popocatepetl, located 40 miles southeast of Mexico City. Officials have created a 7.5-mile restricted zone around the cone of the volcano. Popo, as the volcano is known, has displayed a "notable increase in activity levels" in the last few days, including tremors and explosive eruptions, according to a statement from the federal government.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
An exploding underwater volcano is causing a new island to form in the Pacific Ocean about 620 miles south of Tokyo, and you can watch a bit of its dramatic rise in the video above. The video, showing thick plumes of steam and ash shooting out of the new volcanic island, was captured this week by the Japan Coast Guard. The new island -- really more of an islet -- is just 600 feet in diameter, according to an Associated Press report . And it is unclear whether it is here to stay.
SCIENCE
November 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A volcano may be stirring more than a half-mile beneath a major ice sheet in Antarctica, raising the possibility of faster base melting that could ultimately affect climate. Seismologists working in a mountainous area of Marie Byrd Land in western Antarctica detected a swarm of low-magnitude earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 similar to those that can precede volcanic eruptions, according to a study published online Sunday in Nature Geoscience. The area of activity lies close to the youngest in a chain of volcanoes that formed over several million years, and the characteristics and depth of the seismic events are consistent with those found in volcanic areas of Alaska's Aleutian Islands, the Pacific Northest, Hawaii and Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, the study concludes.
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